WorldCat Identities

Fahrbach, Susan E.

Overview
Works: 9 works in 20 publications in 1 language and 124 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Encyclopedias 
Roles: Author, Other, Editor, Thesis advisor
Classifications: QP356.45, 571.71
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Susan E Fahrbach
Developmental neuroscience : a concise introduction by Susan E Fahrbach( Book )

6 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This textbook offers a concise introduction to the exciting field of developmental neuroscience, a discipline concerned with the mechanisms by which complex nervous systems emerge during embryonic growth. Bridging the divide between basic and clinical research, it captures the extraordinary progress that has been achieved in the field. This accessible textbook is unique in that it takes an in-depth look at a small number of key model systems and signaling pathways. The book's chapters logically follow the sequence of human brain development and explain how information obtained from models such as Drosophila and zebrafish addresses topics relevant to this area. Beginning with a brief presentation of methods for studying neural development, the book provides an overview of human development, followed by an introduction to animal models. Subsequent chapters consider the molecular mechanisms of selected earlier and later events, neurogenesis, and formation of synapses. Glial cells and postembryonic maturation of the nervous system round out later chapters. The book concludes by discussing the brain basis of human intellectual disabilities viewed from a developmental perspective
Hormones, Brain and Behavior, Five-Volume Set by R. Arthur Arnold( )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hormones, Brain, and Behavior is a comprehensive work discussing the effect of hormones on the brain and, subsequently, behavior. This five-volume major reference work has 106 chapters covering a broad range of topics with an extensive discussion of the effects of hormones on insects, fish, amphibians, birds, rodents, and humans. To truly understand all aspects of our behavior, we must take every influence (including the hormonal influences) into consideration. Donald Pfaff and a number of well-qualified editors examine and discuss how we are influenced by hormonal factors, offering insight, an
Hormones, brain, and behavior by Donald W Pfaff( Book )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Hormones, Brain, and Behavior, Second Edition" is a comprehensive work discussing the effect of hormones on the brain and, subsequently, behavior. This major reference work has 106 chapters covering a broad range of topics with an extensive discussion of the effects of hormones on insects, fish, amphibians, birds, rodents, and humans. To truly understand all aspects of our behavior, we must take every influence (including the hormonal influences) into consideration. Donald Pfaff and a number of well-qualified editors examine and discuss how we are influenced by hormonal factors, offering insight, and information on the lives of a variety of species. "Hormones, Brain, and Behavior" offers the reader comprehensive coverage of growing field of research, with a state-of-the-art overview of hormonally-mediated behaviors. This reference provides unique treatment of all major vertebrate and invertebrate model systems with excellent opportunities for relating behavior to molecular genetics. The topics cover an unusual breadth (from molecules to ecophysiology), ranging from basic science to clinical research, making this reference of interest to a broad range of scientists in a variety of fields. Available online via ScienceDirect, with limited edition print version. Features include: comprehensive coverage of a growing field of research; unique treatment of all major vertebrate and invertebrate model systems with excellent opportunities for relating behavior to molecular genetics; and, covers an unusual breadth ranging from molecules to ecophysiology, and from basic science to clinical research
Queen mandibular pheromone modulates hemolymph ecdysteroid titers in adult Apis mellifera workers by Ashton M Trawinski( )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The regulation of motoneuron survival in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta by Mikyung Kim Choi( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The death of half of the neurons in the abdominal nervous system accompanies the emergence of the adult Manduca sexta moth. The cell loss is regulated both by hemolymph concentrations of a steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, and in the case of the MN-12 motoneurons, by actions exerted by neighboring ganglia. To study the interactions between the pterothoracic ganglion and the first unfused abdominal ganglion, A3, I have chosen motoneuron-12 (MN-12) as a model system. I have developed culture conditions in which the pattern of cell death parallels that seen in intact moths. Using this in vitro system, I have replicated the sparing effect on MN-12 of cutting the ventral nerve cord anterior to the first unfused abdominal ganglion. This effect was most readily seen when the cultures were initiated between 21 and 24 h after adult ecdysis, suggesting that this period may be the "window of sensitivity" to a neuron-killing factor. Results also suggest the existence of a soluble neuron-killing factor in the M. sexta nervous system. In order to test the hypothesis that this programmed cell death is an active process regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone, I tested the effects of RNA and protein synthesis inhibitors and the effect of the steroid on the survival of the D-IV and MN-12 motoneurons. The death of neurons was markedly reduced by treatment with actinomycin D and cycloheximide. The ability of actinomycin D to prevent neuronal death waned at the same time at which replacement of the steroid hormone could no longer block neuronal death. This suggests that the steroid commitment point represents the time at which the genes that mediate cell death are transcribed. Cycloheximide remained effective in delaying or blocking neuronal death until shortly before the onset of degeneration, suggesting a need for altered pattern of protein expression within the cell before death can occur. In order to identify the antineurotrophic factor originating in the pterothoracic ganglion, aqueous pterothoracic ganglia extracts (PTE) were prepared. SDS-PAGE gels revealed that the size of possible killer-protein may be around 18-20 kilodalton. This antineurotrophic protein is referred to as Manduca "neurocidin". (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Characterizing ecdysteroid titer profiles and the functional role of ecdysteroids in adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) by Ashton M Trawinski( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The reproductive ground plan hypothesis (RGPH) suggests the coordination of social behaviors in honey bees emerged from pathways that regulate reproduction in solitary species. I examined possible mechanisms of the RGPH in honey bees through analysis of the ecdysteroid profiles of adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Ecdysteroids have been thought to play little role in the physiology of adult worker honey bees outside of reproduction because little was known about ecdysteroid production across the lifespan of individual workers. The data reported here reveal that significant and dynamic production of ecdysteroids occurs in adult worker honey bees, typically in the absence of morphological signs of ovarian development, and that queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) regulation of ecdysteroid production is dependent upon social context. Additionally I explored novel roles of ecdysteroids in behavior and physiology. Comparison of observations in the first days of foraging revealed that 20- hydroxyecdysone (20E) treated bees displayed higher levels of foraging activity than vehicle-treated controls, suggesting a novel role for the ecdysteroids present in adult worker bees. I further demonstrated preliminary evidence of a modulatory effect of QMP on hemocytes in worker bees and a potential enhanced recovery from a decrease in hemocytes by treatment of 20E. I also provide evidence that bees held in queenless conditions may have unique immunocompetence profiles, specifically reducing the production of glucose oxidase (GOX). The results presented here provide an updated view of ecdysteroid profiles of adult bees and present an initial survey of the role of ecdysteroids and pheromone exposure in the physiology and behavior of adult worker honey bees
Impact of pesticides on the neural structures of the honey bee, Apis mellifera by James Joseph Privitt( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Fipronil, a commonly used pesticide, is a GABA receptor antagonist that induces hyperexcitability in the central nervous system of insects. Its use is controversial because it is a suspected contributor to the global decline of non-target pollinator populations. Sublethal doses of fipronil reduce colony fitness and impair learning and memory in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. The mushroom bodies, insect brain regions required for learning and memory, receive GABAergic inputs that may be sensitive to fipronil. The synaptic organization of the mushroom bodies was investigated in adult worker honey bees exposed to fipronil using immunolabeling of the pre-synaptic marker anti-synapsin I and laser scanning confocal microscopy. This permits visualization of synaptic complexes called microglomeruli. Exposure of worker honey bees to fipronil at field-realistic (1 ppb), as well as lower (0.1 ppb) and higher (4 ppb) concentrations decreased the density of microglomeruli in the mushroom body lip (olfactory) and collar (visual) neuropil regions in adult-treated honey bees. These data indicate that sublethal doses of fipronil can alter the structure of the adult honey bee nervous system, possibly through induced synaptic pruning. These results potentially link impaired learning with abnormal synaptic organization, suggesting a neural mechanism by which fipronil reduces the fitness of honey bee foragers and, ultimately, colonies. These results will be compared with structural changes in the mushroom body neuropil observed after exposure of worker honey bees to two other commonly used pesticides, imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid) and coumaphos (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor)
Hormones, Brain and Behavior Online( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Timekeeping in the honey bee colony: integration of circadian rhythms and division of labor by Darrell Moore( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Hormones, Brain and Behavior, Five-Volume Set Hormones, brain, and behavior
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Hormones, brain, and behavior
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English (20)