WorldCat Identities

Walters, Kate

Overview
Works: 29 works in 30 publications in 1 language and 1,111 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Biography  Poetry 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: HB615, 338.040941
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Kate Walters
Karl Abraham : the birth of object relations theory by Isabel Sanfeliú( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1,009 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Together with Ferenczi, Karl Abraham was perhaps Freud's most creative and devoted disciple. In this book, after outlining the socio-cultural context of the day, Isabel Sanfeliu examines Abraham's life as a student, his family environment and his first steps as a physician and psychoanalyst. As a clinical doctor Abraham was calm and detached, and a good example of a stable and objective analyst. Despite his strong personality, his loyalty towards Freud never wavered. At the pioneering Psychoanalytic Institute which he founded and directed in Berlin, he established a series of professional stan
Young guns : the inspirational stories of the most successful young entrepreneuers of the last 10 years by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Young guns by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

'Young Guns profiles over 300 of the most successful young entrepreneurs in the UK and looks at what it's like to start a business when you're young. It has tips and advice for young entrepreneurs on the problems and challenges they will face, along with key lessons from those who have succeeded
Caravan Europe : Central and South East Europe, Benelux and Scandinavia( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Caravan Europe : France and Andorra( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TOURING SPAIN AND PORTUGAL 2017 by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TOURING EUROPE 2017 by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Caravan Europe : Spain and Portugal( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

TOURING FRANCE : a guide to touring and over 3000 sites in france 2017 by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trade marks as keywords in search engine advertising and the problem of "invisible use" by Kate Walters( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Vision impairment and risk of frailty: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Age-related vision impairment has been associated with comorbidities, current disability, and poor quality of life. However, it is unclear whether vision impairment is associated with increasing future frailty, further affecting ability to live independently. We investigated the association of poor vision with incident pre-frailty and frailty. Methods: 2836 men and women aged 60 years or more with data on vision (self-reported vision problems) and frailty status (Fried phenotype) from the nationally representative English Longitudinal Study of Ageing were followed up for 4 years for pre-frailty and frailty between 2004 and 2008. Frailty was defined according to number of Fried phenotype components present (slow walking, weak grip, self-reported exhaustion, weight loss, low physical activity) as non-frail (0 components), pre-frail (1–2), and frail (≥3). Participants non-frail at baseline were followed up for incident pre-frailty and frailty. Participants pre-frail at baseline were followed up for incident frailty. Findings: At baseline, 1396 participants (49%) were non-frail, 1178 (42%) pre-frail, and 262 (9%) frail. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of pre-frailty and frailty among those non-frail at baseline, and 133 new cases of frailty among those pre-frail at baseline. Cross-sectional analysis showed an association between vision impairment and frailty (age-adjusted and sex-adjusted odds ratio 2·53, 95% CI 1·95–3·30; p<0·0001) which remained after further adjustment for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, falls, cognition, and depression. In longitudinal analysis, compared with non-frail participants with no vision impairment, non-frail participants with vision impairment had double the risk of becoming pre-frail or frail at follow-up (2·07, 1·32–3·24; p=0·002) and the association remained after further adjustment for covariates (1·86, 1·17–2·95; p=0·009). Pre-frail participants with vision impairment did not have greater risks of becoming frail at follow-up (1·34, 0·82–2·19). Interpretation: Older adults who experience poor vision and are not frail have double the risk of becoming pre-frail or frail over 4 years. Public health interventions aiming to identify and actively manage vision impairment might prevent frailty. Funding: AEML is funded by theNational Institute for Health Research School for Public Health Research (509546 ). LAC is funded by theBritish Heart Foundation (RG/10/001/28296 ) and the Medical Research Council (RG71546). SER is funded by aUK Medical Research Council fellowship (G1002391 )
TOURING EUROPE by The Caravan Club( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Barriers, facilitators, and effective interventions for lowering cardiovascular disease risk in people with severe mental illnesses: evidence from a systematic review and focus group study( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: People with severe mental illnesses die early from cardiovascular disease (CVD). They have increased CVD risk factors, yet are less likely to receive appropriate treatments. Little is known about effective interventions to reduce CVD risk in severe mental illness. This study aimed to consolidate the best available evidence on lowering CVD risk in severe mental illness in primary care. Methods: 75 participants took part in 14 focus groups. Participants included people with severe mental illness, general practitioners, practice nurses, community mental health staff, and carers. Staff were asked to identify the training, resources, and systems required to lower CVD risk in severe mental illness, while access to services, motivation, and capability to lower CVD risk were explored with people with severe mental illness. Effective interventions were identified through a systematic review. We searched the Cochrane Library for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the Cochrane Schizophrenia and Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Trial Registers between 1966 and 2014 for additional RCTs. Search terms were (schizophrenia, severe mental illness, bipolar, mania, manic, hypomani*, psychos*, psychotic, rapid cycling, schizoaffective) AND (physical, cardio*, metabolic, weight, tobacco, smok, medical, alcohol, nutrition, diet, health, diabet*, blood pressure, hypertension, cholesterol, statin). Non-English language papers were excluded. Data from included studies were extracted with a template to record methodological and substantive characteristics. Findings: Focus groups identified five barriers: negative perceptions of severe mental illnesses, difficulties accessing services, difficulties managing a healthy lifestyle, not attending appointments, and lack of awareness of CVD risk. Five facilitators included social support, improving patient engagement, continuity of care, positive feedback, and goal setting. 15 systematic reviews and 28 additional RCTs were included. Effective pharmacological and behavioural interventions to manage weight and promote smoking cessation or reduction were identified. There was minimal evidence of effective interventions to reduce alcohol use and blood glucose and no evidence for interventions targeting cholesterol, hypertension, or diabetes. Interpretation: CVD risk attributable to weight and smoking can be reduced in severe mental illness; other risk factors must currently be managed as for other populations. However we identified factors that can be incorporated in the design, delivery, and evaluation of services to reduce CVD risk for people with severe mental illness in primary care. New interventions should address these barriers and harness facilitating factors to reduce CVD risk in this population. Funding: This work was funded as part of a National Institute for Health Research Programme grant for applied research (ref RP-PG-0609-10156)
Songs from a bamboo flute by Kate Walters( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Island of a thousand blossoms : a book of haiku by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Facilitators and barriers for recruiting and engaging hard-to-reach older people to health promotion interventions and related research: a systematic review( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Older people from particular groups engage less in health promotion interventions and related research, potentially generating inequities. This review aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to participation in health promotion interventions or health promotion-related research in groups of older people known to participate less. Methods: We focused on older people from black and minority ethnic groups, older people in deprived areas, and those aged 85 years and older (oldest-old). We searched Medline, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, Embase, PsychINFO, SSCI, CINAHL, and SCIE databases (Jan 1, 1990, to Dec 31, 2014) to identify eligible studies reporting facilitators and barriers of recruiting or engaging any of the three groups in health interventions or health promotion-related research (see appendix for search terms). Eligible study designs included surveys, qualitative interviews and focus groups, and mixed methods. Recruitment and engagement strategies reported were identified and analysed thematically for each group. Themes were identified by two researchers independently and agreed with the team. Findings: 34 studies (three with oldest-old, 24 with black and minority ethnic groups, five within deprived areas, one with both oldest-old and black and minority ethnic groups, one with both oldest-old and deprived areas) were included. Half of studies reported mainly on recruitment; half on engagement. 16 studies focused on participation in interventions; 18 studies were on participation in related research. Facilitators for recruiting in deprived areas included targeting social aspects of participation and providing a personalised approach. Similarly, building trust was important for recruitment from black and minority ethnic groups and oldest-old. Facilitators for engaging black and minority ethnic groups included involving community leaders and recruitment during existing activities; for the oldest-old gaining family support was important. Facilitators across all groups included use of incentives and well-targeted advertising. Barriers among black and minority ethnic groups included fear of falling, poor knowledge of benefits, lack of self-confidence, family responsibilities, and cultural barriers (language, mixed-sex sessions, religious practices). Barriers among the oldest-old included tiredness and feeling too old for preventive health care. Negative social interaction with research staff was a barrier identified in deprived areas only. Barriers across all groups were lack of motivation, deteriorating health, costs, and lack of transportation. Interpretation: This review has identified numerous facilitators and barriers for recruiting and engaging hard-to-reach older people in health promotion interventions and related research; these include specific facilitators and barriers for particular groups, which should be considered in practice. Funding: This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). AL is funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research
Energy or war : Iran's nuclear prospects : senior honors thesis by Kate Walters( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sensory impairments and incident disability in older men living in a British community: a 2 year follow-up study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Sensory impairments are common in older adults, who are a rapidly growing proportion of the UK population, making age-related sensory impairments an increasingly important public health concern. We explored the association between impairments in hearing and vision and the risk of incident mobility disability, activities of daily living (ADL), and instrumental ADL (IADL). Methods: 3981 men aged 63–85 years from the population-based British Regional Heart Study were followed from Jan 1, 2003, to April 30, 2005. Self-reported data on hearing aid use and ability to follow television at a volume acceptable to others allowed for four categories of hearing: could hear (reference group), could hear with hearing aid, could not hear and no aid, and could not hear despite aid. Vision impairment was defined as not being able to recognise a friend across a road. Measures of disability included mobility disability (defined as unable to take stairs up or down, or unable to walk 400 yards, or a combination of these movements), ADL difficulties, and IADL difficulties. Logistic regression was used to assess associations. All participants provided written, informed consent. Ethics approval was obtained from local research ethics committees. Findings: At baseline, 3108 men were free from mobility disability, 3346 were free from ADL difficulties, and 3410 were free from IADL difficulties. New cases of disability at follow-up included mobility disability (n=238), ADL (n=260), and IADL (n=207). Men who could not hear and did not use a hearing aid had greater risks of mobility disability (age-adjusted relative risk 2·24, 95% CI 1·29–3·89). Being unable to hear, irrespective of hearing aid, was associated with increased risks of ADL (without aid 1·74, 1·19–2·55; with aid 2·01, 1·16–3·46). Men who could hear and used a hearing aid and men who could not hear despite an aid had increased risks of IADL (1·86, 1·29–2·70 and 2·74, 1·53–4·93, respectively). Vision impairment was not associated with incident mobility disability. Interpretation: Older men with hearing impairment have an increased risk of subsequent disability. Prevention and correction of hearing impairment could enhance independent living in later life. Further research is warranted on the possible pathways underlying the associations, to prevent adverse health outcomes associated with age-related hearing impairment. Funding: The British Regional Heart Study is funded by the British Heart Foundation. AEML is funded by the National Institute for Health Research School for Public Health Research (509546). SER is funded by a UK Medical Research Council Fellowship (G1002391)
An investigation of the cognitive processes that contribute to faculty development among selected nursing educators in Michigan by Kate Walters( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

TOURING SPAIN AND PORTUGAL by The Caravan Club( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Kate Walters onderzoeker

Kate Walters researcher

Languages
English (23)