WorldCat Identities

Cass, Karen

Overview
Works: 288 works in 763 publications in 1 language and 4,359 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Historical fiction  Detective and mystery fiction  History  Psychological fiction  Biographical fiction  Biography  Romance fiction  Autobiographical fiction  War fiction 
Roles: Narrator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Karen Cass
Mrs. Sinclair's suitcase : a novel by Louise Walters( Recording )

15 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 366 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roberta, a lonely thirty-four-year-old bibliophile, works at The Old and New Bookshop in England. When she finds a letter inside her centenarian grandmother's battered old suitcase that hints at a dark secret, her understanding of her family's history is completely upturned. Running alongside Roberta's narrative is that of her grandmother, Dorothy, as a forty-year-old childless woman desperate for motherhood during the early years of World War II. After a chance encounter with a Polish war pilot, Dorothy believes she's finally found happiness, but must instead make an unthinkable decision whose consequences forever change the framework of her family. The parallel stories of Roberta and Dorothy unravel over the course of eighty years as they both make their own ways through secrets, lies, sacrifices, and love
Crooked heart : a novel by Lissa Evans( Recording )

8 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When Noel Bostock--aged ten, no family--is evacuated from London to escape the Nazi bombardment, he lands in a suburb northwest of the city with Vera Sedge--a thirty-six-year-old widow drowning in debts and dependents. Always desperate for money, she's unscrupulous about how she gets it. Noel is mourning his godmother Mattie, a former suffragette. Wise beyond his years, raised with a disdain for authority and an eclectic attitude toward education, he has little in common with other children and even less with the impulsive Vee, who hurtles from one self-made crisis to the next. The war's provided unprecedented opportunities for making money, but what Vee needs--and what she's never had--is a cool head and the ability to make a plan. On her own, she's a disaster. With Noel, she's a team. Together, they cook up a scheme. Crisscrossing the bombed suburbs of London, Vee starts to make a profit and Noel begins to regain his interest in life. But there are plenty of other people making money out of the war--and some of them are dangerous. Noel may have been moved to safety, but he isn't actually safe at all
Stalin's daughter : the extraordinary and tumultuous life of Svetlana Alliluyeva by Rosemary Sullivan( Recording )

16 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A painstakingly researched, revelatory biography of Svetlana Stalin, a woman fated to live her life in the shadow of one of history's most monstrous dictators; her father, Josef Stalin
Into the darkest corner by Elizabeth Haynes( Recording )

11 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Utterly convincing in its portrayal of obsession, it is an ingeniously structured and plotted tour de force of suspense that marks the arrival of a major new talent
A river in the sky by Elizabeth Peters( )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It's 1910 and archaeologist Amelia Peabody heads for Palenstine hoping to prevent an English adventurer called Morely from causing damage during his search for the vanished treasures of the Temple in Jerusalem. The War Office fears increasing German influence in Palenstine and insists Morley is working for German intelligence
Human remains by Elizabeth Haynes( Recording )

10 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How well do you know your neighbours? Would you notice if they lived or died? Police analyst Annabel wouldn't describe herself as lonely. Her work keeps her busy and the needs of her ageing mother and her cat are more than enough to fill her time when she's on her own. But Annabel is shocked when she discovers her neighbour's decomposing body in the house next door, and appalled to think that no one, including herself, noticed her absence. Back at work she sets out to investigate, despite her police officer colleagues lack of interest, and finds data showing that such cases are frighteningly common in her own home town. A chilling thriller and a hymn to all the lonely people, whose individual voices haunt the pages, Elizabeth Haynes new novel is a deeply disturbing and powerful thriller that preys on our darkest fears, showing how vulnerable we are when we live alone, and how easily ordinary lives can fall apart when no one is watching
The Cottingley secret : a novel by Hazel Gaynor( Recording )

9 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1917, two young Yorkshire cousins, Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright, announce they've photographed actual fairies living in their Cottingley, England, garden. The photos are declared real by none other than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and a nation torn apart by tragedy embraces this amazing event. The cousins keep their secret about the photos for decades, until they decide it's time to tell the truth. One hundred years later, Olivia Kavanagh inherits her grandfather's bookshop, and is amazed to find a manuscript that has been hidden away for decades. She becomes fascinated by the tale it tells. But it's the discovery of an old photograph that leads her to realize how the story of Frances and Elsie intertwines with hers, connecting past to present, and blurring what is real and what is imagined
Against empathy : the case for rational compassion by Paul Bloom( )

10 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A controversial call to arms, Against Empathy argues that the natural impulse to share the feelings of others can lead to immoral choices in both public policy and in our intimate relationships with friends and family. Most people, including many policy-makers, activists, scientists, and philosophers, have encouraged us to be more empathetic--to feel the pain and pleasure of others. Yale researcher and author Paul Bloom argues that this is a mistake. Far from leading us to improve the lives of others, empathy is a capricious and irrational emotion that appeals to our narrow prejudices. It muddles our judgment and often leads to cruelty. We are at our best when we are smart enough not to rely on it, and draw upon a more distanced compassion. Based on groundbreaking scientific findings, Against Empathy makes the case that some of the worst decisions that individuals and nations make--from who to give money to, when to go to war, how to respond to climate change, and who to put in prison--are too often motivated by honest, yet misplaced, emotions. With clear and witty prose, Bloom demonstrates how empathy distorts our judgment in every aspect of our lives, from philanthropy and charity to the justice system; from culture and education to foreign policy and war. Without empathy, Bloom insists, our decisions would be clearer, fairer, and ultimately more moral. Bound to be controversial, Against Empathy shows us that, when it comes to major policy decisions and the choices we make in our everyday lives, limiting our empathetic emotions is often the most compassionate choice we can make
Monday to Friday man by Alice Peterson( Recording )

9 editions published between 2011 and 2013 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With her heart broken, Gilly Brown finds herself alone in London with only her little dog Ruskin for company. It's time to move on. On a friend's advice, she looks for a lodger, a Monday to Friday one, and eventually finds just the right man - Jack Baker. But what exactly does Jack get up to at the weekends?
Villette by Charlotte Brontë( Recording )

5 editions published between 2005 and 2016 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With neither friends nor family, Lucy Snowe sets sail from England to find employment in a girls' boarding school in the small town of Villette. There she struggles to retain her self-possession in the face of unruly pupils, a headmistress who spies on her staff, and her own complex feelings - first for the school's English doctor and then for the dictatorial professor, Paul Emmanuel. Drawing on her own deeply unhappy experiences as a teacher in Brussels, Charlotte Bronte's last and most autobiographical novel is a powerfully moving look at isolation and the pain of unrequited love, narrated by a heroine determined to preserve an independent spirit in the face of adverse circumstances
Illusions of happiness by Elizabeth Lord( Recording )

5 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Madeleine Ingleton has just come home from the Swiss finishing school where she has spent the last two years. She returns to a whirl of parties - and to Hamilton Bramwell, the young man her parents are determined she marry. Hamilton is wealthy and agreeable, but he isn't the man of Madeleine's dreams. Her decision will change her life
The hive by Gill Hornby( Recording )

4 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"It's the start of a new year at St Ambrose. But while the children are in the classroom colouring in, their mosthers are learning sharper lessons on the other side of the school gates. Lessons in friendship. Lessons in betrayal. Lessons in the laws of community, the transience of power... and how to get invited to lunch..."--Publisher description
The white princess, Philippa Gregory by Philippa Gregory( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A river in the sky : a novel by Elizabeth Peters( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Amelia and Emerson follow an expedition searching for the vanished treasures of the Temple in Jerusalem. Besides suspecting the leader of the expedition of inept excavation practices, they believe him to be secretly working for German intelligence
To the moon and back by Jill Mansell( Recording )

6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When Ellie Kendall tragically loses her husband she feels her life is over. But eventually she's ready for a new start ︣at work, that is. She doesn't need a new man when she has a certain secret visitor to keep her company ... Zack McLaren seems to have it all, but the girl he can't stop thinking about won't give him a second glance. If only she'd pay him the same attention she lavishes on his dog. Moving to North London, Ellie meets neighbour Roo who has a secret of her own. Can the girls sort out their lives? Guilt is a powerful emotion, but a lot can happen in a year in Primrose Hill
The king's daughter : a novel by Christie Dickason( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The court of James I is a dangerous place, with factions led by warring cousins Robert Cecil and Francis Bacon. While Europe seethes with conflict between Protestants and Catholics, James sees himself as a grand peacemaker -- and wants to make his mark by trading his children for political treaties. Henry, Prince of Wales, and his sister, Elizabeth, find themselves far more popular than their distrusted father, a perilous position for a child of a jealous king. When Elizabeth is introduced to one suitor, Frederick, the Elector Palatine, she feels the unexpected possibility of happiness. But her fate is not her own to choose -- and when her parents brutally withdraw their support for the union, Elizabeth must take command of her own future, with the help of an unexpected ally, the slave girl Tallie, who seeks her own, very different freedom
Rattle by Fiona Cummins( Recording )

8 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

He has planned well. He leads two lives. In one he's just like anyone else. But in the other he is the caretaker of his family's macabre museum. Now the time has come to add to his collection. He is ready to feed his obsession, and he is on the hunt. Jakey Frith and Clara Foyle have something in common. They have what he needs. What begins is a terrifying cat-and-mouse game between the sinister collector, Jakey's father and Etta Fitzroy, a troubled detective investigating a spate of abductions. Set in London's Blackheath, 'Rattle' explores the seam of darkness that runs through us all; the struggle between light and shadow, redemption and revenge. It is a glimpse into the mind of a sinister psychopath. And it's also a story about not giving up hope when it seems that all hope is already lost
What I did on my holidays by Chris Manby( Recording )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sophie Sturgeon can't wait for her annual summer holiday. Not only will it be a week away from work, it will be a chance to reconnect with her boyfriend Callum. Sophie's spent a lot of time getting ready. She's bought a new wardrobe. She's determined she and Callum will have the best time ever. Then Callum dumps her, the night before they're due to leave. In a show of bravery and independence, Sophie says she'll go to Majorca alone - but in fact, she hides in her London flat. But when her friends, family, and even Callum seem so surprised and delighted at her single girl courage, Sophie decides to go all out and recreate the ultimate "fake break"
Labyrinths : Emma Jung, her marriage to Carl and the early years of psychoanalysis by Catrine Clay( )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A sensational, eye-opening account of Emma Jung's complex marriage to Carl Gustav Jung and the hitherto unknown role she played in the early years of the psychoanalytic movement.Clever and ambitious, Emma Jung yearned to study the natural sciences at the University of Zurich. But the strict rules of proper Swiss society at the beginning of the twentieth century dictated that a woman of Emma's stature--one of the richest heiresses in Switzerland--travel to Paris to "finish" her education, to prepare for marriage to a suitable man. Engaged to the son of one of her father's wealthy business colleagues, Emma's conventional and predictable life was upended when she met Carl Jung. The son of a penniless pastor working as an assistant physician in an insane asylum, Jung dazzled Emma with his intelligence, confidence, and good looks. More important, he offered her freedom from the confines of a traditional haute-bourgeois life. But Emma did not know that Jung's charisma masked a dark interior--fostered by a strange, isolated childhood and the sexual abuse he'd suffered as a boy--as well as a compulsive philandering that would threaten their marriage. Using letters, family interviews, and rich, never-before-published archival material, Catrine Clay illuminates the Jungs' unorthodox marriage and explores how it shaped--and was shaped by--the scandalous new movement of psychoanalysis. Most important, Clay reveals how Carl Jung could never have achieved what he did without Emma supporting him through his private torments. The Emma that emerges in the pages of Labyrinths is a strong, brilliant woman, who, with her husband's encouragement, becomes a successful analyst in her own right
Our life on ice : the autobiography, Jane Torvill and Christopher Dean by Jayne Torvill( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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English (131)