WorldCat Identities

Knight, Sarah 1975-

Overview
Works: 11 works in 45 publications in 2 languages and 2,640 library holdings
Genres: History  Satire  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Exhibition catalogs  Fiction  Sources  Manuscripts  Periodicals 
Roles: Editor, Contributor, Other, Author, Translator
Classifications: JC143.A5, 320.101
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Sarah Knight
Momus by Leon Battista Alberti( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 379 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Momus is the most ambitious literary creation of Leon Battista Alberti, the famous humanist-scientist-artist and "universal man" of the Italian Renaissance. In this dark comedy, written around 1450, Alberti charts the lively fortunes of his anti-hero Momus, the unscrupulous and vitriolic god of criticism. Alberti deploys his singular erudition and wit to satirize subjects from court life and politics to philosophy and intellectuals, from grand architectural designs to human and divine folly. This edition provides a new Latin text, the first to be based on the two earliest manuscripts, both corrected by Alberti himself, and includes the first full translation into English."--Jacket
The progresses, pageants, and entertainments of Queen Elizabeth I by Jayne Elisabeth Archer( Book )

16 editions published between 2007 and 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 299 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

More than any other English monarch before or since, Queen Elizabeth I used her annual progresses to shape her royal persona and to bolster her popularity and authority. During the spring and summer, accompanied by her court, Elizabeth toured southern England, the Midlands, and parts of the West Country, staying with private and civic hosts, and at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The progresses provided hosts with unique opportunities to impress and influence the Queen, and became occasions for magnificent and ingenious entertainments and pageants, drawing on the skills of architects, artists, and craftsmen, as well as dramatic performances, formal orations, poetic recitations, parades, masques, dances, and bear baiting. The Progresses, Pageants, and Entertainments of Queen Elizabeth I is an interdisciplinary essay collection, drawing together new and innovative work by experts in literary studies, history, theatre and performance studies, art history, and antiquarian studies. As such, it will make a unique and timely contribution to research on the culture and history of Elizabethan England. Chapters include examinations of some of the principal Elizabethan progress entertainments, including the coronation pageant Veritas temporis filia (1559), Kenilworth (1575), Norwich (1578), Cowdray (1591), Bisham (1592), and Harefield (1602), while other chapters consider the themes raised by these events, including the ritual of gift-giving; the conduct of government whilst on progress; the significance of the visual arts in the entertainments; regional identity and militarism; elite and learned women as hosts; the circulation and publication of entertainment and pageant texts; the afterlife of the Elizabethan progresses, including their reappropriation in Caroline England and the documenting of Elizabeth's reign by late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century antiquarians such as John Nichols, who went on to compile the monumentalThe Progresses of Queen Elizabeth (1788-1823)
The Oxford handbook of Neo-Latin( Book )

13 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the dawn of the early modern period, around 1400, until the 18th century, Latin was still the European language and its influence extended as far as Asia and the Americas. At the same time, the production of Latin writing exploded thanks to book printing and new literary and cultural dynamics. Latin also entered into a complex interplay with the rising vernacular languages. This handbook gives an accessible survey of the main genres, contexts and regions of neo-Latin, as we have come to call Latin writing composed in the wake of Petrarch (1304-74). Its emphasis is on the period of neo-Latin's greatest cultural relevance, from the 15th to the 18th centuries
The intellectual and cultural world of the early modern Inns of Court by Jayne Elisabeth Archer( Book )

2 editions published between 2011 and 2013 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This text presents an interdisciplinary collection of essays on an important but overlooked aspect of early modern English life: the artistic and intellectual patronage of the Inns of Court and their influence on religion, politics, education, rhetoric, and culture from the late 15th through the early 18th centuries
Queen Elizabeth's book of Oxford( Book )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Queen Elizabeth's Book of Oxford was made in 1566 as a gift for Queen Elizabeth I on the occasion of her first royal visit to Oxford. Though she received many gifts, this manuscript history of the University illustrated with exceptionally fine drawings must have been among the most remarkable. John Bereblock's fine and detailed illustrations are the first systematic visual record of the architecture of the University of Oxford and complement Thomas Neale's inventive text, constructed as an imaginary dialogue between the Queen and her favourite, the Earl of Leicester
Europa triumphans : court and civic festivals in early modern Europe by J. R Mulryne( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in Multiple languages and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Oral-visual contradiction : seeing and hearing in Shakespeare's history plays by Sonia Davi Suman( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Latin drama, religion and politics in Early Modern Europe( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Open form : space, interaction, and the tradition of Oskar Hansen( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Oskar Hansens (19222005) theoretical concept of open form was developed in the context of international debates around late-modern architecture in the 1950s. Open form assumed that no artistic expression is complete until it has been appropriated by its users or beholders. In the following decades, the concept became a key principle of performance and film art, and led to the development of process-oriented and interdisciplinary artistic techniques. Hansens concept revolutionized the traditional means of artistic communication.0This publication examines the impact of Hansens ideas within contemporary visual culture and the redefined role of the viewer since the 1960s. The book includes in-depth interviews with some of the most important protagonists of experimental art in Poland, who investigate the historical impact of the open form. Other contributions comment on the theorys influence on a younger generation of artists. Visual material by Hansen and the artists complete this extensive volume
'Influencing the hearts and lives of all' : Shakespeare, the Church and the Victorians by Anjna Chouhan( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The relationship between the Church in England and 'Victorian Shakespeare' has been outlined by Richard Foulkes and, more recently, Charles LaPorte in his parallel study of biblical and Shakespearean criticism. These works have traced the Victorian conceptualisation of what Gail Marshall has termed the metonymical Shakespeare: that is, the establishment and interaction with Shakespeare the product rather than, strictly speaking, the fundamental interpretations of his drama. This thesis extends Foulkes' work on the official Church sanction of Shakespeare, and asks how it was that the 'Church' in Victorian England influenced critical readings and performances of the plays Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Measure for Measure, King John and Henry VIII. Split into two parts: critical readings and performances, this thesis explores to what extent religious events such as the Oxford Movement, the so-called papal aggression and Public Worship Regulations Act affected interpretations of the plays and their Catholic characters both on the page and stage. Each of these plays invited discussions about sinfulness, disillusionment and redemption: three key themes that recurred in debates about religion throughout the period. More importantly, this study argues that each play was interpreted within an anti-Catholic climate, where nunneries and confessionals were feared; idolatry was considered dangerous, and where Roman Catholic rituals and gestures were outlawed in the Church of England. By re-assessing Victorian Shakespeare discourse as part of a tradition where the languages of Christianity and, specifically, anti-Catholicism were endemic, this thesis proposes that religion was a critical framework within which Shakespeare's drama was interpreted; it was also a subject actively introduced and explored in the visual and spoken world of the stage. Therefore this work is part of the expanding historicist study of Victorian Shakespeare reception, because it rationalises the celebratory interpretations of the plays from the period and, crucially, proposes that religious discourse facilitated a revolution in Shakespeare criticism
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.47 (from 0.06 for The progre ... to 0.90 for Latin dram ...)

Momus
Languages
Covers
The progresses, pageants, and entertainments of Queen Elizabeth IThe intellectual and cultural world of the early modern Inns of CourtQueen Elizabeth's book of OxfordEuropa triumphans : court and civic festivals in early modern Europe