WorldCat Identities

Sin, Isabelle

Overview
Works: 25 works in 44 publications in 1 language and 197 library holdings
Genres: Longitudinal studies  History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HN930.5, 304.80993
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Isabelle Sin
Book translations as idea flows : the effects of the collapse of Communism on the diffusion of knowledge by Ran Abramitzky( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We use book translations as a new measure of international idea flows and study the effects of Communism's collapse in Eastern Europe on these flows. Using novel data on 800,000 translations and difference-in-differences approaches, we show that while translations between Communist languages decreased by two thirds with the collapse, Western-to-Communist translations increased by a factor of four and quickly converged to Western levels. Convergence was more pronounced in the fields of applied and social sciences, and was more complete in Satellite and Baltic than in Soviet countries. We discuss how these patterns help us understand how repressive institutions and preferences towards Western European ideas shaped the international diffusion of knowledge
The geographical mobility of Māori in New Zealand by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper describes the geographical location and internal mobility of the Maori ethnic group in New Zealand between 1991 and 2001. It is often suggested that Maori are less mobile than other ethnic groups because of attachment to particular geographic locations. This paper compares the mobility of Maori in particular locations to the mobility of similar Europeans in those same locations
Māori incomes : investigating differences between iwi by Isabelle Sin( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates several factors that may be important for improving Maori outcomes, and the extent to which their importance varies by iwi. Specifically, it examines the extent to which controlling for differences in characteristics of the European population and the population of various iwi can account for the differences in income distribution between the groups
Exporting, innovation and the role of immigrants by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Book translations as idea flows : the effect of the collapse of communism on the diffusion of knowledge by Ran Abramitzky( Book )

3 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Diffusion of green technology : a survey by Corey Allan( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The settlement experience of Pacific migrants in New Zealand : insights from LISNZ and the IDI by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economic liberalisation and the mobility of minority groups : evidence from Māori in New Zealand by Isabelle Sin( Book )

4 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Between 1984 and 2003, New Zealand undertook comprehensive market-oriented economic reforms. In this paper, we use Census data to examine how the internal mobility of Maori compares to that of Europeans in New Zealand in the period after these reforms. It is often suggested that Maori are less mobile than other ethnic groups because of attachment to particular geographical locations. If this were the case, Maori may have been disadvantaged in the post-reform period because they were more likely to be living in adversely affected areas and less likely to move to pursue better employment opportunities. In contrast to the anecdotal evidence, we find that Maori are more mobile on average than similar Europeans. However, Maori who live in areas with strong networks of their iwi are slightly less mobile than Europeans. The difference between Maori who live locally to their iwi and those who do not is even more pronounced when we consider responsiveness to local labour market shocks. Non-local Maori are considerably more responsive to changes in economic opportunities than are Europeans, whereas local Maori are almost entirely unresponsive."--Author abstract
What drives the gender wage gap? : examining the roles of sorting, productivity differences, and discrimination by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The likely regional impacts of an agricultural emissions policy in New Zealand : preliminary analysis( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How did removing student allowances for postgraduate study affect students' choices? by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parenthood and labour market outcomes by Isabelle Sin( Book )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates the drivers of the gender pay gapin New Zealand, with a particular focus on the role of parenthood wage penalties. As with other nations, the gender pay gap is larger in New Zealand among parents than non-parents, though the mechanisms driving this relationship are not entirely clear. This paper is an initial exploration of what can be learned by combining administrative wage data, birth records, and survey data on hours worked and earnings. It examines the distribution of how long women are out of paid employment after having their first child and how this differs with pre-parenthood income, considers employment rates and wage earnings among employed women each month in the five years before and ten years after birth of their first child, and compares women who spend different lengths of time out of employment both overall and within each pre-parenthood earnings quartile. The findings indicate that parenthood contributes to the gender pay gap by penalising all women, particularly those who are on high incomes, and setting them on a trajectory of lower lifetime earnings relative to their male peers
Why are there more accidents on Mondays? : Economic incentives, ergonomics or externalities by Michelle Poland( )

2 editions published between 2019 and 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research consistently finds more workplace injuries occur on Mondays than on other weekdays. One hypothesis is that workers fraudulently claim that off-the-job weekend sprains and strains occurred at work on the Monday in order to receive workers' compensation. We test this using data from New Zealand, where compensation is virtually identical whether or not an injury occurs at work. We still find that work claims, especially sprains and strains, occur disproportionately on Mondays, although less than in other jurisdictions. This suggests fraudulent claims in other countries are just one part of the story. Furthermore, we find work claims remain high on Tuesdays, and that workers' sprains and strains that occur off-the-job also disproportionately fall on Mondays. Sprains and strains treated at hospitals, which are not closed over the weekend, are also elevated on Mondays. However, Monday lost-time injuries are less severe than injuries on other days. Our findings are consistent with a physiological mechanism contributing to elevated Monday injury claims in New Zealand, but do not suggest doctors' offices being closed over the weekend, ergonomic explanations, or work being riskier on Mondays play important roles
Diffusion of green technology a survey by Corey Allan( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economic liberalisation and the mobility of minority groups evidence from Māori in New Zealand by Isabelle Sin( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Book translations as idea flows : the effects of the collapse of communism on the diffusion of knowledge by Ran Abramitzky( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Taxes vs permits : options for price-based climate change regulation by Isabelle Sin( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"This paper provides an overview of key issues involved in the choice among market-based instruments for climate change policy. Specifically, it examines the potential net benefits from shifting to a permit system for emission reduction, and the preconditions necessary for this change. It also draws out the implications of New Zealand's specific circumstances and current climate policies for future policy development."--Publisher's website
The adoption of environmentally friendly technologies in agriculture by Isabelle Sin( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The effect of trial periods in employment on firm hiring behaviour by Nathan Chappell( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What drives the gender wage gap? : examining the roles of sorting, productivity differences, and discrimination by Isabelle Sin( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As in other OECD countries, women in New Zealand earn substantially less than men with similar observable characteristics. In this paper, we use a decade of annual wage and productivity data from New Zealand?s Linked Employer-Employee Database to examine different explanations for this gender wage gap. Sorting by gender at either the industry or firm level explains less than one-fifth of the overall wage gap. Gender differences in productivity within firms also explain little of the difference seen in wages. The relationships between the gender wage-productivity gap and both age and tenure are inconsistent with statistical discrimination being an important explanatory factor for the remaining differences in wages. Relating across industry and over time variation in the gender wage-productivity gap to industry-year variation in worker skills, and product market and labor market competition, we find evidence that is consistent with taste discrimination being important for explaining the overall gender wage gap. Explanations based on gender differences in bargaining power are less consistent with our findings
 
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Languages
English (39)