WorldCat Identities

Oak, Gillian S.

Overview
Works: 10 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 3,066 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other
Classifications: UB193, 363.3251709599
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Gillian S Oak
U.S. Special Operations Forces in the Philippines, 2001-2014 by Linda Robinson( )

9 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 1,200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines the 14-year experience of U.S. special operations forces in the Philippines from 2001 through 2014. The objective of this case history is to document and evaluate the activities and effects of special operations capabilities employed to address terrorist threats in Operation Enduring Freedom—Philippines through (1) training and equipping Philippine security forces, (2) providing operational advice and assistance, and (3) conducting civil–military and information operations. The report evaluates the development, execution, and adaptation of the U.S. effort to enable the Philippine government to counter transnational terrorist groups. An average of 500 to 600 U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps special operations units were employed continuously under the command of a joint special operations task force. They provided training, advice, and assistance during combat operations to both Philippine special operations units and selected air, ground, and naval conventional units; conducted civil–military and information operations on Basilan, in the Sulu archipelago, and elsewhere in Mindanao; provided intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, medical evacuation, and emergency care; aided planning and intelligence fusion at joint operational commands and force development at institutional headquarters; and coordinated their programs closely with the U.S. embassy country team. The authors conclude that Operation Enduring Freedom—Philippines contributed to the successful degradation of transnational terrorist threats in the Philippines and the improvement of its security forces, particularly special operations units. It identifies contributing and limiting factors, which could be relevant to the planning and implementation of future such efforts
Implications of integrating women into the Marine Corps Infantry by Agnes Gereben Schaefer( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 1,105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study for the U.S. Marine Corps consisted of four tasks: (1) review the literature on the integration of women in ground combat and other physically demanding occupations, (2) conduct interviews with representatives of organizations that have integrated women into physically demanding occupations, (3) estimate the costs of potential initiatives to promote successful gender integration, and (4) develop an approach for monitoring implementation of gender integration of the infantry. RAND researchers present a historical overview of the integration of women into the U.S. military and explore the importance of cohesion and what influences it. The gender integration experiences of foreign militaries, as well as those of domestic police and fire departments, are examined for insights on effective policies. The potential one-time and recurring costs associated with integration are estimated as well. The report culminates in a summary of previous monitoring efforts and broad strategic monitoring issues, as well as recommendations to the Marine Corps for implementation
Building the Guatemalan interagency task force Tecún Umán : lessons identified by Gillian S Oak( )

9 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 601 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guatemala is a major transit point for drugs bound for the United States and the recipient of U.S. counternarcotics aid and technical assistance, much of which is provided through U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) and U.S. Army South. As a first step by Guatemala in putting this aid to work toward developing its own counternarcotics capacity, the president of Guatemala established the Interagency Task Force (IATF) Tecún Umán . USSOUTHCOM has expressed the intent to apply the IATF as a model to other similarly porous Border regions in the area. Thus, documenting and using lessons from the IATF Tecún Umán will help in the development of new and similar units. This report is intended to support that lessons-learned function, demonstrate how these preliminary lessons are being applied to future IATF development, and provide recommendations on how to resolve remaining IATF challenges. Lessons learned include the importance of establishing the interagency legal framework early, clearly defining the interagency relationships, developing an intelligence capability organic to the task force, implementing police authority and leadership, identifying measures of success, communicating the IATF's purpose and success to the public, and maintaining equipment. Remaining tasks include resolving the duality-of-command issue, improving operational planning capability, addressing corruption problems, and addressing IATF Tecún Umán issues before refocusing efforts to IATF Chorti. The United States has played a key role in supporting Guatemala's efforts to overcome these challenges. By investing in the IATF and building capacity, the United States will contribute to the Guatemalans' ability to sustain the IATF themselves
Defense Institution Building : an Assessment by Walt L Perry( Book )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A key element in the Department of Defense's Defense Strategic Guidance is building the capacity of partner nations to share the costs and responsibilities of global leadership. To implement this goal, the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy uses several security cooperation and assistance programs to work with partner countries to support defense institution building (DIB), i.e., build the capacity of their defense ministries. In addition, the combatant commands engage in DIB in response to the security cooperation focus areas in the Guidance for Employment of the Force. DIB has four primary components - Wales Initiative Funds-DIB, Defense Institutional Reform Initiative, Ministry of Defense Advisors, and Defense Institute of International Legal Studies - but includes all security cooperation activities that develop accountable, effective, and efficient defense institutions. The primary objective of many existing DIB activities is to help partner nations develop and manage capable security forces subject to appropriate civilian control. This report presents an analysis of a range of DIB activities, recommends a set of goals and objectives for achieving them, identifies partner nation and DIB activity selection criteria, develops a strategy for coordinating DIB activities, and recommends procedures for achieving accountability and assessment. It also identifies the most critical challenges DIB programs will face as they go forward: the inherent complexity of the DIB enterprise, the difficulty of measuring the long-term success of short-term endeavors, and the challenges of selecting partner nations for DIB activities"--Back cover
U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Employees for Military Personnel : Challenges and Opportunities by Jennifer Lamping Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report examines recent patterns in military-to-civilian conversion--that is, converting military positions to government civilian positions--to identify the primary impediments to such conversions. While Section 129(a) of Title 10 of the United States Code directs the Secretary of Defense to determine the "most appropriate and cost efficient mix" of personnel required to accomplish the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD's) mission, a variety of constraints make it difficult to achieve that goal. RAND's assessment drew on three lines of analysis: (1) a review of statutes and policies governing performance of work by military service members, government civilian employees, and contractors; (2) an analysis of administrative data on DoD military and civilian personnel covering the most recent wave of military-to-civilian conversions (fiscal years 2004-2012); and (3) discussions with subject matter experts across DoD. The RAND team concluded that there is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion. However, there are also numerous impediments to authorizing and executing these conversions. The report offers recommendations for changes to statutes, policies, and business practices that would facilitate military-to-civilian conversions and motivate greater use of this force management tool, should that be DoD's goal"--Publisher's description
U.S. Department of Defense experiences with substituting government civilian employees for military personnel : executive summary by Jennifer Lamping Lewis( Book )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes research on recent patterns in military-to-civilian conversion--that is, converting military positions to government civilian positions--to identify the primary impediments to such conversions. While Section 129(a) of Title 10 of the United States Code directs the Secretary of Defense to determine the "most appropriate and cost efficient mix" of personnel required to accomplish the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD's) mission, a variety of constraints make it difficult to achieve that goal. RAND's assessment drew on three lines of analysis: (1) a review of statutes and policies governing performance of work by military service members, government civilian employees, and contractors; (2) an analysis of administrative data on DoD military and civilian personnel covering the most recent wave of military-to-civilian conversions (fiscal years 2004-2012); and (3) discussions with subject matter experts across DoD. The RAND team concluded that there is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion. However, there are also numerous impediments to authorizing and executing these conversions. The report offers recommendations for changes to statutes, policies, and business practices that would facilitate military-to-civilian conversions and motivate greater use of this force management tool, should that be DoD's goal
Recommendations for improving the recruiting and hiring of Los Angeles firefighters by Chaitra M Hardison( )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Preface; Contents; Figures and Tables; Summary; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; CHAPTER ONE: Introduction; Scope and Limitations of This Report; Time Constraints; The City's Recent Changes; Objectives Guiding the Project; Identify Applicants Most Likely to Be Successful Firefighters; Ensure Equal Opportunity Throughout the Hiring Process; Increase the Demographic Diversity of New Firefighter Hires; Minimize Costs for the City of Los Angeles and Its Applicants; Study Approach; Drawing on Existing Expertise and Past Research
U.S. Department of Defense experiences with substituting government employees for military personnel : executive summary by Jennifer Lamping Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jemaah Islamiyah's Fifth Phase : the Many Faces of a Terrorist Group by Gillian S Oak( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<> by Gillian S Oak( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.22 (from 0.17 for U.S. Speci ... to 0.94 for Jemaah Isl ...)

Languages
English (33)