WorldCat Identities

McIntosh, Anne

Overview
Works: 91 works in 140 publications in 1 language and 1,892 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Made-for-TV movies  Television adaptations  Film adaptations  Internet videos  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Ethnographic films  Television plays  Biographical films 
Roles: Actor, Author
Classifications: PS3525.I5156, 791.4372
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Anne McIntosh
Arthur Miller's Death of a salesman by Volker Schlöndorff( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1,488 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dark drama of a failed man, Willy Loman, whose life did not measure up to his expectations. Movie made for television
Conversations with Jean Rouch( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in Undetermined and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This intimate revealing video of conversations between Jean Rouch and a number of filmmakers and friends, including John Marshall and Colin Young, is unlike any past films on Rouch's life and work. It was shot over a three year period from 1978-1980 by his friend, Ann McIntosh, who taught video under Ricky Leacock at MIT."--Case
Ecological Recovery Monitoring of Dry Mixedgrass Wellsites : Results of Vegetation and Soil Indicator Analyses by Anne McIntosh( )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sometimes I talk, sometimes I sign by Anne McIntosh( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sarah Ana talks about her daily life and her birthday party plans with her hearing mother in spoken English and her deaf father in sign language
Food security : second report of session 2014-15 : report, together with formal minutes relating to the report by Great Britain( Book )

3 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The UK is currently 68% self-sufficient in foods which can be produced at home, but this key indicator has declined steadily over the past 20 years, from 87%. The report says the biggest long-term challenge to food production systems is the impact of extreme weather events resulting from climate change. The Committee supports the idea of 'sustainable intensification' - producing more food with fewer resources - and calls on Defra to stem decline in UK self-sufficiency and deliver more resilience in the UK food system. It notes that for key cereal crops, for example wheat, yield levels have not increased for over 15 years. Other recommendations include: supermarkets to shorten supply chains to reduce threats of disruption; UK farmers to extend seasonal production of fresh fruit and vegetables in coordination with the Agricultural and Horticultural Development Board, and local and central Government; Government to reduce dependence on imported soybean for animal feed, as increased demand for protein from emerging economies threatens current supply lines; and Government to produce a detailed emissions reduction plan for the UK agricultural sector. The Committee welcomes the Government's new £160 million AgriTech Strategy to translate technological ideas into farm practice but warns that current funding levels are insufficient. The Government must also lead a public debate to counter food safety fears among consumers about GM foods and ensure a more evidence-based approach to EU licensing of GM crops. New farmers are needed in the sector, to ensure that farming has a future in the UK
A Montana love affair : letting go and being free by Anne McIntosh( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Implementation of the Common Agricultural Policy in England 2014-2020 : Government response to the Committee's seventh report of session 2013-14 : seventh special report of session 2013-14 by Great Britain( Book )

3 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Against a background where farm incomes are falling, the Government needs to recognise that cutting payments to England's farmers will reduce their ability to compete in the marketplace, will leave farmers less able to invest in vital infrastructure and may make them more vulnerable to shocks such as poor weather, higher input costs and price variations. The Committee also warns against plans to transfer more money away from direct payments to farmers by shifting it towards environmental schemes. It recommends that the Government maintains the current 9% rate of transfer away from the direct payment budget. This rate of transfer should rise to 15% in 2017 only if it can demonstrate that additional funds are required and that this change will deliver a clear benefit. Money should also only go to people who actually farm the land and meet an 'active farmer test'. From 2015, 30% of the direct payment will be conditional on farmers achieving basic environmental measures. A National Certification Scheme approach to 'greening' does not offer the flexibility to avoid the Commission's impractical crop diversification rule so the Government is right to dismiss this approach. A new, single IT system is being developed, and the Government want access to CAP funding to be 'digital by default', meaning farmers will have to apply online. A lot went wrong in the last round of changes, and these problems gave rise to £580 million in penalties. Does it make sense to introduce a new computer system at the same time as complex new payment rules?
The Common Agricultural Policy after 2013 : Government response to the Committee's fifth report of session 2010-11 : fifth special report of session 2010-12 by Great Britain( )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee criticises the European Commission's proposed sweeping reforms of the CAP that would see the current complex and bureaucratic system of direct payments replaced by one that could be even worse. These changes include a new tier of environmental conditions, with penalties for farm businesses that do not comply or fail to meet new criteria for 'active' farmers, farm size and number of employees. The Committee sets out the key principles the UK government should promote. The first objective of the CAP should be to maintain and enhance the EU's capacity to produce food with a significant degree of self sufficiency and, in the long term, less reliance on income support from the tax payer. The UK's future food security is threatened by the low profitability of its agriculture. More than half of UK farm businesses would be unprofitable without the support they receive through the CAP. The Committee concludes that direct payments have a place within the CAP for as long as business conditions in agriculture fail to deliver a thriving and profitable industry. The CAP must deliver a competitive and viable agricultural sector that produces safe and high quality food with a lower environmental impact. The UK should press for the EU to argue more strongly for recognition of environmental and animal welfare production standards within trade agreements. The committee also warns that the EU proposal for a multi-tiered single farm payment will require expensive new computer systems and auditing
Food security : Government response to the Committee's second report of session 2014-15 : fourth special report of session 2014-15 by Great Britain( Book )

2 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy : domestic fisheries management : Government response to the Committee's sixth report of session 2010-12 : sixth special report of session 2010-12 by Great Britain( )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Under the European Common Fisheries Policy quota restrictions are in place for some species and limit the amount of fish which can legally be landed. Under the current system, not all quotas are held by working fisherman. Some holders may be retired or inactive - so called "slipper skippers" - while others may be organisations or individuals outside the fishing industry. These quotas may then be leased back to ordinary fishermen or traded for profit. In this report, the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee says it is "unacceptable" that the government has not been monitoring this trading of EU fish quotas. An unknown number are being bought and sold by people with little or no link to the industry "at the expense of working fishermen". Defra needs to "justify" the current situation since quotas should only be traded if there was a "clear benefit" to fishing communities and there needs to be a register of who these non-fishing interests are. As far as possible, these quotas should not be traded but return to be used by the fishing communities. The Committee also says it is concerned that due to a historic miscalculation, smaller vessels under 10 metres (33ft) long had an unfairly small quota share compared with larger offshore enterprises and recommend a quota reallocation. Defra also needs to do more to tackle the problem of discards, where fish are thrown back into the sea - often to die - because they are of an unwanted species or size, or because of quota restraints
Winter floods 2013-14 : Government response to the Committee's first report of session 2014-15 : third special report of session 2014-15 by Great Britain( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The outcome of the independent Farming Regulation Task Force : Government response to the Committee's tenth report of session 2010-12 : ninth special report of session 2010-12 by Great Britain( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this report the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee welcomes the findings of the independent Task Force on Farming Regulation and calls on Defra to implement its recommendations promptly. In May 2011, the independent Farming Regulation Task Force completed a review of Defra's farming and food related regulations - the first of its kind across Whitehall (http://www.defra.gov.uk/publications/files/pb13527-farm-reg-task-report.pdf). The Committee congratulates the Task Force for striking a successful balance between upholding standards and over-zealous regulation and eagerly awaits a clear timetable of practical steps to cut back the overly burdensome regulations that threaten to stifle English farm businesses. Defra estimates the direct cost of current regulation is upwards of £5bn each year. Yet over half of all Defra's regulations come from EU requirements. It is essential that Defra engages earlier and more proactively in Europe to reduce the cost burden imposed by EU regulations in future. The report also calls for MPs to be given greater powers to scrutinise legislation establishing new regulations. And many more of the Department's own employees should gain some hands-on experience of farming businesses
The Welfare of Laying Hens Directive - implications for the egg industry : Government response to the Committee's ninth report of session 2010-12 : eighth special report of session 2010-12 by Great Britain( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee warn of a potential commercial disaster over animal welfare regulations that could result in unfair competition for UK egg producers. New rules are designed to improve conditions for caged ('battery') hens. The Welfare of Laying Hens Directive (Council Directive 1999/74/EC), which applies to businesses with over 350 laying hens, provides that conventional cage systems must not be used after 1 January 2012. After this date, caged hens must be kept in 'enriched' cages, which have more living space per hen (750 cm2 cage area per hen compared to 550 cm2 in conventional cages - less than an A4 sheet of paper), a nest, perching space, litter to allow pecking and scratching, and unrestricted access to a feed trough. But around one third of Europe's egg production will not comply with the new welfare standards by 2012. UK egg producers have spent around £400 million to improve conditions for laying hens, and will be left at a competitive disadvantage if cheaper, illegal and non-compliant shell eggs and egg products can be imported to the UK from other European countries. The UK Government must press for an intra-community trade ban on the export of non-compliant eggs and egg products, and the EU Commission should initiate infraction proceedings against Member States where caged egg producers remain non-compliant. Failure to enforce this new Directive effectively will set a worrying precedent for other legislation intended to improve the welfare of farm animals
 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.25 (from 0.21 for Sometimes ... to 0.78 for A brief me ...)

Languages
English (41)