WorldCat Identities

Janz, Kathleen

Overview
Works: 20 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 243 library holdings
Genres: Educational films  Nonfiction films  Longitudinal studies  Academic theses  Case studies  Instructional films  Lectures 
Roles: Speaker, Thesis advisor, Other, Contributor, Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Kathleen Janz
Impact of child and adolescent development on adult health : a longitudinal perspective( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 213 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The evidence suggests that childhood and adolescent development is strongly and causally associated with health in adults. Accordingly, an important area of research in the prevention of adult disease involves the early detection and monitoring of change during the first two decades of life. As such, the appropriate approach is to longitudinally model an individual's timing and tempo of growth. Impact of Child and Adolescent Development on Adult Health: A Longitudinal Perspective explores the impact of childhood growth trajectories of physical activity, physical fitness, and body composition on selected adult measures of health. The video features data from a number of world-renowned longitudinal studies
Grip strength cutpoints for youth based on a clinically relevant bone health outcome by Pedro F Saint-Maurice( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Weather and children's physical activity; how and why do relationships vary between countries? by On behalf the ICAD collaborators( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A closer look at the relationship among accelerometer-based physical activity metrics: ICAD pooled data by Soyang Kwon( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Correction to: A closer look at the relationship among accelerometer-based physical activity metrics: ICAD pooled data by On behalf of the ICAD Collaborators( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The vertical jump test as a health promotion screening tool for predicting bone strength in young adults by Maggie Marie King( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Data were analyzed using Pearson bivariate and partial correlations to examine associations among bone strength outcomes and muscle power. Logistic regression was used to examine the probability of below-average bone strength based on muscle power. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to show the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and to display the accuracy of a peak vertical jump test as an assessment tool for aBMD. Logistic regression indicated the odds ratio of below-average height-adjusted femoral neck aBMD decreased 5.4% for females and 3.6% for males per 50 Watts of power. ROC curve analysis showed the best sensitivity-specificity trade-off for identifying individuals with and without below-average aBMD was 5,038 Watts in males (sensitivity = 73.7%; specificity = 62.4%; AUC = 0.709, 95%CI = 0.572 - 0.847) and 3,261 Watts in females (sensitivity = 71.4%; specificity = 58.9%; AUC = 0.708, 95%CI = 0.586 - 0.829). These cut off values correspond to a vertical jump height of 54.39 cm and 36.16 cm for males and females, respectively. Taken together, the results of these analyses suggest acceptable sensitivity and specificity and moderate discriminate ability for using a measure of muscle power, assessed with a peak vertical jump test, to identify young adults with below-average aBMD
Calibration of the global physical activity questionnaire to Accelerometry measured physical activity and sedentary behavior by Kristen M Metcalf( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parental characteristic patterns associated with maintaining healthy physical activity behavior during childhood and adolescence by Soyang Kwon( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physical activity levels and profiles and their relation to physical fitness in children and adolescents : the Muscatine study by Kathleen F Janz( )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effect of family and friend support on physical activity through adolescence: a longitudinal study by Joanna L Morrissey( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activity on nocturnal and next day hypoglycemia in adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes by Kristen Marie Metcalf( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After controlling for sex, % body fat (%BF), and fitness, the likelihood of hypoglycemia (</= 70 mg/dl) at nighttime or the next day due to MVPA was examined using logistic regression. Participants were of average fitness (females: 43.9 ml/kg/min; males: 49.8 ml/kg/min) and fatness (females: 26.2%; males: 19.2%), and 63.2% of participants met the US federal guidelines of accumulating 60 min/d of MVPA. Hypoglycemia was 38% more likely in those who had 30 min/d more MVPA than those with less (95% CI: 1.13, 1.69; p =0.002). The results indicate that participating in MVPA increases the risk of hypoglycemia later on. The relationship is independent of sex, %BF and fitness and next-day MVPA. While promoting PA as a healthy behavior, it is important to educate adolescents with T1DM on prevention of hypoglycemia following PA
Physical activity intensity, bout-duration, and cardiometabolic risk markers in children and adolescents by On behalf of the International Children's Accelerometry Database (ICAD) Collaborators( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The interplay between obesity, biomechanics and fitness within the reverse causation hypothesis by Bhupinder Singh Holland( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Obesity is a significant public health concern, with implications for the health and well being of millions of people in the United States and world. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between obesity, segment biomechanics in the form of joint stress and restricted range of motion, and cardiorespiratory fitness. In three studies, anatomical modeling using three dimensional infrared motion capture system was used to calculate joint stresses and range of motion limitations. The results are applied to better understand the impact that obesity has on biomechanics, taking into consideration factors of fitness and fatigue, during walking and common rehabilitation exercises. The first study compared the biomechanical differences between ten obese and ten normal weight adults while performing squat and lunge exercises and found significant increases in lower limb moments in obese females. Increased moments suggest that obese individuals experience higher biomechanical stress than normal weight individuals and may have less flexibility in selecting movement strategies while performing basic rehabilitation exercises
Good Health: The Power of Power( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Power has long been considered to be a skill-related fitness component. However, based on recent evidence, a strong case can be made for the classification of power as a health-related fitness component. Additionally, the evidence indicates that performing physical activities that build power is associated with the healthy development of bones (e.g., enhanced bone mass and architecture, reduced fracture risk) and muscles. Tests of power are good proxy measures for bone health, and the evidence provides support for including measures of power in health-related fitness test batteries for youth. The current research literature also supports the inclusion of physical activities that build power in school physical education and athletic programs, community programs, and programs for adults, including older adults
Understanding health through the eyes of rural adolescents by Joanna Lynn Morrissey( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to develop a theory grounded in the health experiences of rural adolescents. By exploring the embodied experiences within a unique population of rural Iowan adolescents, many who are overweight/obese and/or of Hispanic descent, the developed theory was also used to inform a tailored health intervention for middle school students. The review of the literature revealed that the study of adolescent physical activity and body image concerns is largely measurement driven, and often explored from a deficit perspective. Thus, there remains a gap in the literature regarding the contextualized experience of health. This project used a qualitative approach to generate a theory grounded in stories adolescents shared regarding their health. Eighteen adolescents (13-15 years old) participated in one-on-one interviews. Grounded theory principles were used to understand how personal health experiences were socially constructed and explored the meanings participants derived from such experiences. An unstructured interview guide was used to gather information on health, physical activity, nutrition, and body image. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Charmaz's (2006) version of grounded theory. A total of 28 codes emerged from the data to construct the Theory of Embodied Health and Wellness. The complex interplay of personal health behaviors, eco-sociocultural influence, and everyday experience mold adolescents' embodied health and wellness experiences. Participants reported a wide range of personal, social, cultural and environmental influences on their health experiences. Feeling in control, connected, and competent were major themes in how participants experienced, maintained, or challenged their health experiences within their sociocultural environment
Physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, adiposity, and cardiovascular health in children and adolescents by Soyang Kwon( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The aim of the third paper was to examine whether accelerometer-measured daily light-intensity PA is inversely associated with DXA-derived body fat mass during childhood. The study sample was 577 children participating in the longitudinal Iowa Bone Development Study. Fat mass and PA were measured at about 5, 8, and 11 years of age. Two PA indicators were used, applying two accelerometer count cut-points: the daily sum of accelerometer counts during light-intensity PA (IW-LPA) and the daily sums of accelerometer counts during high-light-intensity PA (IW-HLPA). Measurement time point- and gender-specific multivariable linear regression models were fit to predict fat mass based on IW-LPA and IW-HLPA, including covariates, such as age, birth weight, fat-free mass, height, IW-MVPA and maturity (only for girls). Among boys, both IW-LPA and IW-HLPA were inversely associated with fat mass at age 11 (P <0.05), but not at ages 5 and 8. Among girls, both LPA variables were inversely associated with fat mass at ages 8 and 11 (P <0.10 for LPA at age 11, P <0.05 for others), but not at age 5. In conclusion, this study suggests that light-intensity PA may have a preventive effect against adiposity among older children
Chasing the kids : does it count? : an examination of physical activity in middle aged mothers with respect to national physical activity guidelines by Kelli Marie O'Neil( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Physical activity levels of urban and rural young children in the Iowa Bone Development Study by Elaine Constance Cooperstein( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Odds for excess media use were higher for rural boys (OR 2.11; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.11) and for low SES boys (OR 2.99; 95% CI: 1.34 6.68), as well as for low SES girls (OR 4.12; 95% CI: 1.95, 8.71). Although rural and urban children's MVPA and VPA did not differ in this thesis, rural and low SES boys had both higher daily media hours and increased odds for exceeding AAP media recommendations. Odds for excess media also were increased for low SES girls. Interventions to improve healthy behaviors of young children by limiting screen-based recreation and/or supplying means for alternate activity and play opportunities may be especially beneficial when focused on lower SES and rural areas
Social cognitive factors associated with moderate to vigorous physical activity in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women by Heather Chi Medema-Johnson( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Results showed significant relationships between social cognitive factors and each physical activity outcome, supporting the use of such variables for understanding physical activity behavior in peri- and postmenopausal women. For steps per day and MVPA minutes per day, 32% and 26% of the variance in activity was explained. For past year MVPA, past week leisure MVPA, and occupational/ transport MVPA, 39%, 26%, and 27% of the variance in activity was explained, respectively. The combination of variables entering the models was different for each physical activity outcome, but overall, SEB consistently emerged as the most prominent factor. Moderation analyses revealed a three way interaction effect between SEB, SSFR, and ACF for steps per day, and two-way interaction effects between SEB and SSFR for past year MVPA and past week leisure MVPA. Mediation analysis indicated SSFA confounded the relationship between SEB and past year MVPA. Results of this study indicate social cognitive factors are directly and indirectly associated with total and MVPA in peri- and postmenopausal women. These relationships should be considered when aiming to develop physical activity intervention programs for prevention of OP in peri- and postmenopausal populations
Physical Activity, Not Sedentary Time, Predicts Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry-measured Adiposity Age 5 to 19 Years( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: Purpose: To examine the associations among physical activity (PA), sedentary time (SED), and TV viewing (TV) with fat mass (FAT) and visceral adipose tissue mass (VAT) from childhood through adolescence (5-19 yr). Methods: Participants in the Iowa Bone Development Study ( n = 230 males and 233 females) were examined at ages 5, 8, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 yr. Accelerometers measured moderate- or vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA; min·d −1 ), light-intensity PA (LPA; min·d −1 ), and SED (h·d −1 ). Parent-proxy report (5 and 8 yr) and child-report (11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 yr) measured TV (h·d −1 ). X-ray absorptiometry scans measured FAT (kg) and VAT (g). Sex-specific growth models were used to create FAT and VAT growth curves for individual participants (level 1), and to test the effect of MVPA, LPA, SED, and TV (level 2) after adjusting for weight, height, linear age, nonlinear age, and maturity. Results: Growth models indicated that low levels of MVPA were associated with high levels of FAT and VAT for males and high levels of FAT for females. TV viewing was positively associated with FAT and VAT for males and females. LPA was positively associated with FAT in males. Sedentary time was not associated with FAT or VAT for males or females ( P > 0.05). Conclusions: This study supports current PA guidelines focusing on MVPA rather than SED. The contribution of high TV, but not high SED, to high levels of adiposity suggests that TV's contribution to obesity is not just a function of low energy expenditure
 
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Alternative Names
Janz, Kathleen

Languages
English (22)