WorldCat Identities

Foraker, Randi E.

Overview
Works: 14 works in 14 publications in 1 language and 24 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Contributor, Other, Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Randi E Foraker
Lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy and socioeconomic status: atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) surveillance study by Joseph P Kitzmiller( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rethinking the role and impact of health information technology: informatics as an interventional discipline by Philip R. O Payne( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Predictors of vasomotor symptoms among breast cancer survivors by Katherine W Reeves( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Change in longitudinal trends in sleep quality and duration following breast cancer diagnosis: results from the Women's Health Initiative by Chloe M Beverly( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Neighborhood socioeconomic status, Medicaid coverage and medical management of myocardial infarction: Atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) community surveillance by Randi E Foraker( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Community-level determinants of obesity: harnessing the power of electronic health records for retrospective data analysis by Caryn Roth( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Diagnosis-specific readmission risk prediction using electronic health data: a retrospective cohort study by Courtney Hebert( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Opportunities for Epidemiologists: from Precision Medicine to Population Health by Randi E Foraker( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oncologists' Perceptions of a Digital Tool to Improve Cancer Survivors' Cardiovascular Health( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Socioeconomic status and the progression of heart failure by Randi E Foraker( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of the modified FINDRISC to identify individuals at high risk for diabetes among middle-aged white and black ARIC study participants( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objective: To evaluate a modified Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) for predicting the risk of incident diabetes among white and black middle-aged participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Research design and methods: We assessed 9754 ARIC cohort participants who were free of diabetes at baseline. Logistic regression and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate a modified FINDRISC for predicting incident diabetes after 9 years of follow-up, overall and by race/gender group. The modified FINDRISC used comprised age, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure medication and family history. Results: The mean FINDRISC (range, 2 [lowest risk] to 17 [highest risk]) for black women was higher (9.9 ± 3.6) than that for black men (7.6 ± 3.9), white women (8.0 ± 3.6) and white men (7.6 ± 3.5). The incidence of diabetes increased generally across deciles of FINDRISC for all 4 race/gender groups. ROC curve statistics for the FINDRISC showed the highest area under the curve for white women (0.77) and the lowest for black men (0.70). Conclusions: We used a modified FINDRISC to predict the 9-year risk of incident diabetes in a biracial US population. The modified risk score can be useful for early screening of incident diabetes in biracial populations, which may be helpful for early interventions to delay or prevent diabetes
How Are Previous Physical Activity and Self-Efficacy Related to Future Physical Activity and Self-Efficacy?( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Self-efficacy (SE) has been found to be a robust predictor of success in achieving physical activity (PA) goals. While much of the current research has focused on SE as a trait, SE as a state has received less attention. Using day-to-day measurements obtained over 84 days, we examined the relationship between state SE and PA. Postmenopausal women (n = 71) participated in a 12-week PA intervention administered via cell phone and monitored their daily PA using a pedometer. At the end of each day, they reported their state SE and number of steps. Using a longitudinal model, state SE was found to be a robust predictor of PA even after accounting for trait SE and other covariates. The findings offer insights about the temporal relationship between SE and PA over the course of an intervention, which can be of interest to researchers and intervention designers
A national assessment of ideal cardiovascular health among emergency medical service professionals by Melissa Ann Bentley( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This dissertation examines cardiovascular health (CVH) among Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers. CVH is defined by the American Heart Association (AHA) as the simultaneous presence of seven ideal factors; smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, healthy diet score, total cholesterol, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose. Cardiovascular diseases comprise the top causes of death in the United States, and because of this, the AHA has set forth a 2020 Impact Goal to improve the CVH of those in the United States by 20% while reducing mortality from cardiovascular events by 20%. The first aim of this dissertation was to compare overall CVH, and its individual components, between nationally-certified EMS professionals and the general population. Overall ideal CVH and ideal component CVH was found to be higher in EMS when compared to the general population. Specifically, EMS professionals were more likely to have ideal levels of physical activity, diet, cholesterol and fasting blood glucose. The second aim of this dissertation was to identify associations between work-life characteristics and CVH among EMS professionals. Some work-life characteristics were identified to be associated with ideal CVH. It was noted that as the number of EMS organizations at which the provider performed EMS work increased, overall CVH ii decreased. Those providers working in aeromedical services and those who reported conducting patient care had higher prevalence of ideal CVH when compared to other types of agency types and services. Lastly, those providers who were more highly satisfied with their main EMS job had a higher prevalence of ideal CVH when compared to those that were dissatisfied. The third aim of this dissertation was to identify associations between CVH and absenteeism among EMS professionals. A higher prevalence of workplace absenteeism was observed among first responders when compared to estimates from the general working population. Females self-reported a higher number of missed workdays when compared to males and as age increased, an increase in number of missed workdays and a decrease in ideal CVH was observed. Those individuals who were married reported fewer missed workdays and higher ideal CVH then those of other types of marital status. With respect to work-life characteristics, those EMS professionals practicing in an advanced life support setting (Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians and paramedics) reported greater average missed workdays than those working in a basic life support setting (Emergency Medical Responders and Emergency Medical Technicians). Lastly, as typical weekly call volume increased to did the reported absenteeism. Specific characteristics that were found to be associated with both absenteeism and CVH included sex, age, marital status, certification level and typical weekly call volume. This dissertation highlights the necessity for several areas of future research in both cardiovascular disease and occupational epidemiology. First, a longitudinal assessment of CVH and research into tailored public health interventions to increase the proportion of EMS providers with all seven ideal CVH components is needed. Second, an understanding of the causal relationship between CVH and health outcomes and job performance among EMS professionals is warranted. Since stressful work conditions are thought to exacerbate cardiovascular disease risk, additional workplace interventions to mitigate the negative consequences of providing prehospital emergency care may be needed. Lastly, a detailed assessment of the causal mechanisms linking CVH with workplace absenteeism is required to expand the understanding of the relationship between the EMS profession and overall health
Dietary status of HIV-infected individuals aged 18-49 years in NHANES 2001-2012 for prevention and resolution of dyslipidemia by Joyce Elizabeth Rudy( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Dyslipidemia, defined as abnormal concentrations of serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, is prevalent in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected population. This condition is caused by the virus, antiretroviral drugs, and traditional risk factors. Public health is concerned with dyslipidemia due to its proatherogenic properties, the rising number of cardiac events in this population, permanence of viral infection, and use of pharmacological treatments necessary to sustain life. Lifestyle interventions, such as diet are recommended for initial treatment and prevention of dyslipidemia, yet few studies have measured dietary intake against the accepted dietary guidelines. Objective: This study sought to examine determinants of dyslipidemia, assess dietary intake of macromolecules that comprise a diet to control plasma lipid concentrations and maintain an ideal plasma lipid profile, identify correlates with macromolecule intake, and measure association of individual macromolecules with dyslipidemia. Methods: This sample comprised a national representation of persons living with HIV in the United States (US) measured in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001 to 2012. Only persons with results from validated laboratory tests used to obtain HIV status and dyslipidemia status were included in the study. Subject's daily dietary intake was compared to the guidelines of the therapeutic lifestyle changes diet in the Third Report of the National Cholesterol and Education Program on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adults Treatment Panel III) [NCEP/ATP III]. Diet was collected through one self-reported 24-hour recall of the previous day's food consumption. Recalled foods were entered into a database to calculate daily dietary intake of macromolecules. Chi-square tests examined statistically significant differences in the proportion of dyslipidemics across subjects' demographics. Crude logistic regression models measured the effect of every 10% increase in the natural log of daily intake of a macromolecule on odds of dyslipidemia. Missing data were excluded from analyses
 
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Associated Subjects
Socioeconomic status and the progression of heart failure
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Alternative Names
Foraker, Randi

Languages
English (14)