WorldCat Identities

University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

Overview
Works: 4 works in 4 publications in 1 language and 4 library holdings
Classifications: GC1552.P75,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by University of Alaska Fairbanks
Using fishers' knowledge to explore spatial fishing patterns, perceptions of regulations, and environmental change in Alaska by Maggie Chan( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this dissertation, an interdisciplinary approach was used to examine fisher knowledge from recreational charter and subsistence fishers targeting Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in Alaska. The first chapter identified biological, regulatory, social, and economic drivers of spatial fishing patterns by charter operators in two communities in Alaska. In Homer, the most frequently cited reasons for changes in the location and/or extent of fishing were changes in trip type and the price of fuel, while in Sitka, the most frequently cited reasons for spatial shifts were changes to Pacific halibut regulations and gaining experience or exploring new locations. The second chapter examined perceptions of charter operators to traditional and novel recreational fishery management tools. Results highlighted that controls on individual harvest can be perceived to have unintended consequences for charter businesses, such as effects on profitability and distance traveled. The third chapter explored variability in local ecological knowledge (LEK) of fish abundance and body size trends among charter operators and subsistence harvesters. Results suggested that peoples' perceptions of fish abundance and body size can be affected by attributes of their fishing experience and highlighted the importance of including people with different types of experience in the environment when using LEK to document environmental changes. Together, these chapters contribute to an improved understanding of the human dimensions of small-scale fisheries in Alaska, including perceptions of fishers regarding the management system and shifts in fishing behavior in response to environmental, socioeconomic, and regulatory change. Additionally, this project documented and evaluated variation in local ecological knowledge to contribute new information on data-limited marine fish species in Alaska
Effects of variable maternal diet conditions on the reproductive success and development of the California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) by Charlotte Marie Regula-Whitefield( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Anthropogenic and natural climate change is altering the biology and ecology of marine organisms, which can be reflected in the supply of primary production that provides food for consumers. Primary producers differ in their biochemical composition, and marine food webs are thus based on specific combinations of producers that provide key nutrients such as dietary fatty acids (FA). Some FA cannot be synthesized by marine invertebrates, and must be acquired directly from diets. Reproductive processes in marine invertebrates are often timed to correspond with seasonal patterns in primary production, such that dietary FA and other nutrients can be partitioned to eggs to provide energy for cell division and biomolecules needed for membrane development. My dissertation investigates the consequences of changing patterns in primary production by examining the effects of maternal diet on reproductive fitness of a deposit feeder, and provides information to support the management and continued captive culturing of the commercially harvested Parastichopus californicus (California sea cucumbers). In chapter 1, I describe a novel live-spawning method and quantify basic reproductive parameters for P. californicus. Peak spawning in the Southeast AK population was about two months earlier and three times smaller than previously observed in British Columbia, Canada. Live-spawned captive females produced more viable eggs and strip-spawned females produced higher fecundity rates. These findings are relevant for the management of commercially harvested populations of P. californicus because they more accurately define spawning seasons, and provide a reliable method to spawn captive animals for further aquaculture development. In chapter 2, I present the results of feeding experiments that explore the effects of two mono-specific algal feeds with different FA profiles on female reproductive output and pre-feeding larval fitness. Females fed with the green alga Tetraselmis sp. had higher fecundity, but there was reduced larval survival relative to females that were fed the diatom Thalassiosira sp. Similar rates of larval development were recorded in both feed treatments. Significant differences were observed in the abundance of FA 20:5ɷ3 (EPA), 22:3ɷ6 (DHA), 12:0, 16:0, and 18:0 FAs in eggs and female gonads between the two feed treatments. In chapter 3, I used field collections in Southeast AK to assess temporal patterns feeding behavior and diet, and examined tissue-specific patterns in total lipid and FA storage and utilization, in in situ populations of P. californicus. All tissue ratios (percent of each tissue relative to the total body mass) varied significantly among collection dates. Tissue and gut content total lipid content also varied significantly among collection dates, except for muscle tissue. Shell debris and terrestrial debris were abundant in all guts regardless of collection date. FA composition differed significantly among females with different gonad maturation periods in skin, viscera, and gonads, suggesting the use of lipids stored in skin and viscera for gonad development. These results further the understanding of dietary factors affecting reproductive fitness in deposit feeders by demonstrating the importance of diet and lipid storage to gonad development
Long-term monitoring: nearshore benthic ecosystems in Kachemak Bay by Brenda Konar( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Examination of the nearshore ecosystem of Kachemak Bay, Alaska, from benthic to upper trophic levels conducted 2012 to 2016. Quantitative information on key biotic elements of various habitat types was collected and made publically accessible
Characterization of the circulation on the Continental Shelf areas of the northeastern Chukchi and western Beaufort seas by Thomas J Weingartner( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report provides a summary and synthesis of data collected over the shelf and breakshelf of the northeastern Chukchi and western Beaufort seas from 2012 through 2014. A wide variety of observations were obtained from moored oceanographic instruments, satellite-tracked drifters, hydrography (both recent, from towed-CTD and autonomous underwater vehicles, and historic, from ship measurements), high-frequency radars (HFR), meteorological buoys, and satellite imagery
 
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