WorldCat Identities

Polk family

Overview
Works: 190 works in 254 publications in 1 language and 2,972 library holdings
Genres: History  Personal correspondence  Diaries  Personal narratives‚Ä°vConfederate 
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Most widely held works about Polk family
 
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Most widely held works by Polk family
Dillon and Polk family papers( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The collection is chiefly family correspondence, 1866-1912, of Frances Polk Dillon (1844-1912); her sisters, Sarah Rachel Polk Jones (1833-1905), Emily Donelson Polk Williams (1837-1892), and Mary Brown Polk Yeatman (1835-1890) of Maury County, Tenn.; her husband, Col. Edward Dillon (1835-1897), of Botetourt and Rockbridge counties, Va.; and other relatives throughout the South. THe majority of the letters were written by and to the women of the Dillon and Polk families. Most concern domestic life and family matters. Papers, 1805-1863, including letters from Col. Dillon to his mother while he was in the U.S. and Confederate armies, 1859-1863, and personal correspondence of earlier members of the Polk and Dillon families, including Edward Dillon (fl. 1805-1815) and Mary Eastin Polk (1810-1847). Correspondents include John Randolph of Roanoke (1773-1833) and Andrew Jackson (1767-1845)
by Polk (Family :( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Correspondence, will, scrapbook, photos, and other papers of or about Leonidas Polk, who was first Episcopal bishop of Louisiana, took part in the founding of University of the South (Sewanee, Tenn.), and served as a major general in the Confederate Army, his wife, Frances Ann Devereux Polk, and their descendants. Includes genealogical information on the Polk and Devereux families, and souvenirs from University of the South
Gale and Polk family( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chiefly personal correspondence of members of the related Gale and Polk families. Included are ante-bellum papers of Thomas Gale, physician of Davidson, Tenn., who owned plantations in Jefferson and Yazoo counties, Miss., concerning family affairs, politics, and epidemics in Tennessee, and agriculture in Mississippi; Civil War letters of Gen. Leonidas Polk (1806-1864) and of his son-in-law and aid, William Dudley Gale, concerning military affairs in Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi; recollections (1895) of W.D. Gale's wife, Katherine (Polk) Gale, of her life during the Civil War in Nashville, Tenn., Yazoo County, Miss., and Asheville, N.C.; and diary (1873-1874) of L. Polk's wife, Frances (Devereux) Polk, recording her activities in the Gale household near Nashville
Smiley-Polk Family documents by Polk (Family :( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Polk, Brown, and Ewell family papers( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection includes financial papers and correspondence of the Polk family of North Carolina and Tennessee; family correspondence of the Campbell family of Tennessee; and military, financial, business, and family papers of the Brown and Ewell families of Tennessee. Polk family papers include correspondence between William Polk of Raleigh, N.C., and his son Lucius Junius Polk of Maury County, Tenn., regarding the management of William's land in Tennessee, cotton growing, agriculture, relations with slaves and overseers, and Tennessee and national politics. Campbell family papers consist of a few legal and financial documents and correspondence of Liszinka Campbell Brown (1820-1872) and her brother George Washington Campbell, Jr., regarding family matters, European travel, plantation life, slave insurrections, and Indian wars. Brown and Ewell family papers include those of Lt. Gen. Richard Stoddart Ewell and Major George Campbell Brown, consisting of military papers and personal correspondence relating to their service in the Confederate Army, imprisonment at the close of the war, and defense of Ewell's military record (particularly at First Manassas and Gettysburg). There are also business and financial papers regarding the management of the family's Spring Hill plantation in Maury County, Tenn., including items relating to cotton growing and sheep raising, problems with securing labor, and legal and financial concerns; correspondence with agents and family members regarding the family's Melrose and Tarpley plantations in Bolivar County, Miss.; and letters from other family members. There are also volumes kept by Campbell Brown for household expenses for the Spring Hill plantation and of memoranda during his Civil War service
Polk family papers in the Library of Congress by Polk (Family :( )

1 edition published in 1767 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Correspondence, indentures and legal agreements, circulars, pamphlets, and other papers of a North Carolina family, whose members included Leonidas Polk and President James Knox Polk. The bulk of the collection consists of letters to William Polk (1758-1834) concerning the University of North Carolina, elections of 1824 and 1828, the Bank of the United States, and the politics of Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, John Q. Adams, and Henry Clay. Included are copies of documents relating to the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence and a biography, 1859, of William Polk. Correspondents include John Q. Adams, Alfred Balch, John Branch, Joseph Caldwell, Andrew Jackson Donelson, John H. Eaton, Daniel Graham, Andrew Jackson, William B. Lewis, Willie P. Mangum, and Thomas Ruffin
Polk, Badger, and McGehee family papers( )

1 edition published in 1790 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection contains original documents and microfilm. Original documents consist letters written by members of the Polk, Badger, and McGehee families, particularly those of George Edmund Badger (1795-1866); his second wife, Mary Brown Polk Badger (1808-1835); their younger daughter, Sarah Polk Badger McGehee (1833-1903), also known as Sally; and Sally's husband, Montford McGehee (1822-1895). Polk materials consist of letters and poems by George Badger to Mary Polk Badger, beginning in 1825 during their courtship and married life, particularly when he was traveling for court business. Also included is a memorandum by Mary Badger written shortly before her death in 1835, giving instructions for the disposition of her keepsakes and heirlooms. Letters to Sally Badger begin in 1841 with letters primarily from her father. Beginning in 1859, there are letters to Sally from Montford McGehee. There is only one letter from 1863, and no papers for the years 1861-1862 or 1864-1869. The remainder of the material consists of a few scattered letters to and from friends, a poem titled "In Memoriam of Gen'l Leonidas Polk," a quotation from F.W. Robertson, and the envelopes that originally housed the correspondence. The microfilm includes other letters and two scrapbooks containing a number of newspaper obituaries. Among the microfilm-only materials are letters of Mary Brown Polk while at school in Philadelphia and of Sally Badger at Saint Mary's School in Raleigh. There are also 1862 letters of Montford McGehee during the Civil War when he served as aid to General James Johnson Pettigrew. He wrote from Richmond, Fredericksburg, and the Virginia Peninsula and during the retreat following the evacuation of Yorktown
Polk family papers by Polk (Family :( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection includes letters to Frances Polk Skipwith (1835-1884) of Oxford, Miss., from her mother Frances Devereux Polk (Mrs. Leonidas Polk) in New Orleans, La., Asheville, N.C., Nashville, Tenn., and at Columbia Female Institute, Columbia, Tenn., discussing her struggles as a teacher and other matters; her brothers and sisters at various Southern locations; her husband, Peyton H. Skipwith, at various locations and Washington, D.C., including love letters in the late 1860s; and friends and other relatives. Most letters are about family affairs and local news, reflecting the efforts of Southern families to manage in the midst of the difficulties and privations of the Reconstruction period. The Addition of December 2008 consists of 17 letters to Frances Devereux Polk Skipwith from family friends Winchester and Ruth Hall. Winchester Hall commanded the 26th Louisiana Infantry Regiment and published a book detailing the Regiment's history, role in the Siege of Vicksburg, and ultimate disbandment after the Civil War. Most of the letters date between 1863 and 1866. The letters cover a variety of topics including Ruth Hall's experiences during the Union invasion of Louisiana in 1863, including mention of a slave uprising after a Confederate retreat; the death of Skipwith's father, Leonidas Polk; Winchester Hall's thoughts on the future of the South; and other routine topics
 
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