WorldCat Identities

Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program

Overview
Works: 35 works in 62 publications in 1 language and 161 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Classifications: LB3052.M4, 370.9744021
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Most widely held works about Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program
 
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Most widely held works by Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program
Summary of district performance( )

in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Massachusetts testing program( )

in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On their own, student response to open-ended tests in math by Elizabeth Badger( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents a summary of information about the use in Massachusetts of open-ended questions in the Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program's biennial assessment of mathematics at grades 4, 8, and 12. These questions appeared in one form of the tests in each grade. One-twelfth of the fourth-graders, one-sixteenth of the eighth-graders, and one-twentieth of the twelfth-graders who were tested in 1988 received a test form that contained some open-ended questions. The open-ended questions covered three major areas in school mathematics: (1) patterns and relationships; (2) geometry and measurement; and (3) numerical and statistical concepts. Sample test items and an analysis of student responses are provided for each grade level in the three areas of mathematics. In general, students did not cope well with finding patterns and did not become more proficient as they got older. Students did not have a firm understanding of geometry. Twelfth graders were better at estimation than were younger students, but many were not able to estimate problems with decimals. Many students in all grades were unable to explain basic mathematical concepts or basic applications. Overall, many students did not even attempt to answer the open-ended questions, perhaps reflecting a belief that mathematics represents mere computation, rather than a logical system of relationships. Implications for teaching are discussed. Student responses and their frequencies are summarized in an appendix. (Sld)
Reading and thinking : a new framework for comprehension( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On their own, student response to open-ended tests in science by Elizabeth Badger( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the spring of 1988, the Massachusetts Department of Education administered its second biennial assessment (the Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program), testing students in grades 4, 8, and 12 in reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. This report discusses the use of open-ended questions in one form of the science tests. One-twelfth of the fourth graders, one-sixteenth of the eighth graders, and one-twentieth of 12th graders who were tested in 1988 received a test form that contained some open-ended questions. These open-ended questions were designed to examine two areas of science comprehension: scientific inquiry, and the understanding of scientific concepts. Sample test items and an analysis of student responses are provided for each grade level in the two areas of science understanding. Although students appeared to know and recognize the rules and principles of scientific inquiry when presented as stated options, they seemed to be baffled by unstructured situations that demanded an application of these principles. The examination of students' conceptions of some basic scientific theorems revealed many inadequacies in students' abilities to apply the scientific method to real problems. Student responses underlined the fact that many assumptions made about what students know and understand are unfounded. Open-ended questioning appears to be a way for teachers to really understand how their students rationalize the world around them. Student responses and their frequencies are summarized in an appendix. (Sld)
Statewide summary( )

in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On their own, student response to open-ended tests in reading by Elizabeth Badger( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the spring of 1988, Massachusetts conducted its second Educational Assessment Program to assess the performance of students in grades 4, 8, and 12 in reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students' responses to open-ended questions in one form of the reading test were studied. One-twelfth of the fourth-graders, one-sixteenth of the eighth-graders, and one-twentieth of the 12th-graders tested received a test form that contained some open-ended questions. Student responses to 11 open-ended questions across the three grades are reviewed, along with sample test items. Several trends were apparent that have clear developmental and instructional implications. Students performed reasonably well when asked to interpret poetry, but had great difficulty with its formal and figurative aspects. Difficulty with figurative language was also apparent for nonfiction. Difficulties in abstraction persisted throughout the grades. Students generally performed well when asked to interpret the thoughts and actions of characters. Difficulties with the more external aspects of reading suggested a lack of familiarity with recognizing metaphor, identifying the effects of structural aspects of the text, and viewing the text as a genre in itself. An appendix classifies the open-ended questions according to the Massachusetts Framework for Reading Comprehension and presents results to enable comparison of students statewide. (Sld)
On their own, student response to open-ended tests in social studies by Brenda Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the spring of 1988, the Massachusetts Department of Education administered its second biennial assessment (the Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program) of students in grades 4, 8, and 12 in reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. This report discusses the use of open-ended questions in the tests of social studies. One-twelfth of the fourth graders, one-sixteenth of the eight graders, and one-twentieth of the 12th graders who were tested in 1988 received a form of the test that contained some open-ended questions. Questions were designed to examine: (1) distinguishing facts and opinion (grade 4); (2) problem solving (grades 4 and 8); (3) cause and effect (grade 4); (4) thematic history (grades 8 and 12); (5) current events (grades 8 and 12); and (6) evaluation of evidence (grades 4, 8, and 12). Sample test items and an analysis of student responses are provided for each grade level in the respective areas of social studies. These open-ended questions confirmed the findings of the multiple-choice sections of the assessment program in social studies; students generally knew diverse facts, but did not know how to apply the facts to form a coherent whole. They were not able to transfer what they knew to what they saw around them. Student responses and their frequencies are summarized in an appendix. (Sld)
Description of the MEAP proficiency scales by Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Moving geometry from the back of the book : a report on geometry and measurement in the 1986 assessment( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ... Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Science performance at grades 8 and 12 : further analysis of the 1988 test results( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program : social studies report by Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the results of an assessment of social studies in the state of Massachusetts. From 240 to 390 test items were administered to all students in grades 4, 8, and 12. The test covered history, government/citizenship, geography, sociocultural environment, economics, multicultural environment, social studies process skills, and analysis/evaluation of information. Because of the breadth of the test, each student took only a portion of the entire test battery and scores were aggregated at the school level. In addition to the test items, questionnaires were given to each of the students, their teachers, and their principals. The purpose of the questionnaires was to obtain information on curriculum, instruction, and other factors. Comprised of four chapters, chapter 1 gives the background of the testing program and describes the development and content of the test itself. Chapter 2 discusses student achievement in detail, using specific items to illustrate conclusions. Chapter 3 examines curriculum and instructional practices, as reflected in responses to the questionnaire, and relates these practices to performance on the test. Chapter 4 presents a summary and conclusions. (DB)
Science in the elementary schools( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On their own : students' responses to open-ended questions in math, reading, science, social studies : results of the 1990 assessment( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beyond paper & pencil by Elizabeth Badger( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the spring of 1989, over 2,000 pairs of fourth- and eighth-grade students were assessed on their ability to apply mathematical and scientific concepts. The tests (administered in alternate years during the written assessments of the Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program) required students to apply what they knew about mathematics and science to solve the problems. The following eight brochures, which describe the testing program, present test items, and provide the results are presented: (1) "Background Summary" introduces the testing program; (2) "Popcorn Estimation" (both grades) requires students to estimate the number of kernels in a container; (3) "Insulation" requires eighth graders to estimate the insulating capacities of hot drink cups; (4) "Cubes" requires students in both grades to determine the number of rectangular solids that could be made with 16 cubes; (5) "Animal/Leafkey" tests classification abilities for students in both grades; (6) and (7) "Math Town" (grade 8) aned "Playground" (grade 4), respectively, involve measurement of areas and perimeters, and organizational ability; and (8) "Circuits" (both grades) tests students' comprehension of electricity and simple circuits. Although students appeared to enjoy these problems, it was evident that solving this kind of problem was new for them. Implications of the results for teaching are discussed. (Sld)
School achievement : how Massachusetts students measure up : a report on the 1990 Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summary of state results, 1986-1988 by Massachusetts Testing Program( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.61 (from 0.33 for Braintree ... to 1.00 for The 1992 M ...)

Alternative Names
Massachusetts. Educational Assessment Program

Languages
English (62)