WorldCat Identities

Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Geo-Heat Center

Overview
Works: 193 works in 225 publications in 1 language and 760 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Researcher, Other
Classifications: TJ280.7, 621.44
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
Quarterly bulletin( )

in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook( Book )

2 editions published between 1989 and 1998 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of these resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse, aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental considerations. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very potential in the United States
Geothermal energy in the Northwest : site specific development analyses( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Engineered study of the use of geothermal energy to dry wood waste for densification( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Outline specifications for direct-use wells and equipment( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Modifications for geothermal heating system for Kingswood Apartments, Klamath Falls, Oregon( Book )

2 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Kingswood Apartments, located on Eberlein Street in Klamath Falls, are currently heated by a geothermal well producing 118F water. Geothermal water from the well is piped directly through fan coil units in each of the 117 apartments and disposed of in the storm sewer system. Since the installation of the system in 1975, a large number of corrosion failures of the finned tube coils have occured with increasing frequency. This corrosion is probably the result of small concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) dissolved in the geothermal water. This constituent is not compatible with the copper of which the finned coils are made. The possibility of modifying the existing, open type piping system to a closed loop/heat exchanger design to minimize the current corrosion problems is explored
Marketing the Klamath Falls geothermal district heating system by Kevin D Rafferty( Book )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The new marketing strategy for the Klamath Falls system has concentrated on offering the customer an attractive and easy to understand rate structure, reduced retrofit cost and complexity for his building along with an attractive package of financing and tax credits. Initial retrofit costs and life-cycle cost analysis have been conducted on 22 buildings to date. For some, the retrofit costs are simply too high for the conversion to make sense at current geothermal rates. For many, however, the prospects are good. At this writing, two new customers are now connected and operating with 5 to 8 more buildings committed to connect this construction season after line extensions are completed. This represents nearly a 60% increase in the number of buildings connected to the system and a 40% increase in system revenue
Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring
Heating facilities Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon( )

3 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Utilizing the warm well water for a geothermal greenhouse heating system is highly economically feasible. This is based on using the 88F water from Anderson Well No. 1 to heat greenhouses totaling approximately 10.6 acres. The additional investment of $640,000 above the cost for a conventional electric boiler system shows a rate of return of 48.3% on a 20 year life cycle analysis. The simple payback is 3 years. The 88F well water is not warm enough for prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) aquaculture, since water flow requirements are excessive to maintain the desired 80F pond temperature. However, the water is warm enough to maintain a 60F pond temperature for trout farming. Trout farming using the 88F well water directly is probably not economically feasible due to high electrical pumping cost (34,626 per year) for the seven 1/2 acre ponds that could be heated. Trout farming using the 75F effluent water from the 10.6 acre greenhouse to heat four 1/2 acre ponds may be economically feasible since the water booster pumping cost is low $1189 per year
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H₂S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H₂S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10 or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft heat transfer surface area
Haystack Resources Company greenhouses, near Boulder, Colorado( )

2 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Design specifications for an agricultural center where greenhouses will be supplied with geothermal water and heating systems are evaluated. (ACR)
Feasibility study for the direct use of geothermal energy for onion dehydration in Vale/Ontario area, Oregon final report( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oregon a guide to geothermal energy development( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)
Geothermal energy in Montana site data base and development status( )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. More specific information is included under the planning regions and site specific data summaries. A brief discussion of the geothermal characteristics and a listing of a majority of the known hot springs is included. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented, including: economics, financing, state leasing, federal leasing, direct-use technology, water quality laws, water rights, and the Major Facility Siting Act. (MHR)
Vertical pump turbine oil environmental evaluation by Gene Culver( )

2 editions published between 1991 and 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines the capital and operating costs for fossil fuel-fired peak heating systems in geothermally (direct use) heated greenhouses. Issues covered include equipment capital costs, fuel requirements, maintenance and operating costs, system control and integration into conventional hot water greenhouse heating systems. Annual costs per square foot of greenhouse floor area are developed for three climates: Helena, MT; Klamath Falls, OR and San Bernardino, CA, for both boiler and individual unit heater peaking systems. In most applications, peaking systems sized for 60% of the peak load are able to satisfy over 95% of the annual heating requirements and cost less than $0.15 per square foot per year to operate. The propane-fired boiler system has the least cost of operation in all but Helena, MT climate
Geothermal energy in Idaho : site data base and development status by David W McClain( )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Idaho, including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, lease and development status, institutional factors, legal aspects, population and market, and development. (MHR)
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H₂S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H₂S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10 or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft heat transfer surface area
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance by Don H White( )

8 editions published between 1980 and 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The area suggested for district heating feasibility study encompassed slightly over 400 acres extending north and south from the geographic center of the city. This district was subdivided into 8 areas, which include the Grande Ronde Hospital, Eastern Oregon State College, La Grande school district, one institutional area, one commercial area and three residential areas. Basic space heating loads developed for the various areas after a survey by county personnel and computation using a computer program form the basis for this economic feasibility study
Washington a guide to geothermal energy development( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)
Pilot fruit drier for Los Azufres geothermal field, Michoacan, Mexico( )

3 editions published between 1993 and 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it's true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area
 
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Alternative Names
Languages
English (47)