WorldCat Identities

Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Geo-Heat Center

Overview
Works: 179 works in 249 publications in 1 language and 800 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Researcher, isb, Other
Classifications: TJ280.7, 621.44
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
 
Most widely held works by Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.).
Quarterly bulletin( )

in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook( Book )

2 editions published between 1989 and 1998 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of these resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse, aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental considerations. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very potential in the United States
Heating facilities, Klamath Work Activities Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon( Book )

4 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geothermal aquaculture project, Real Property System's, Inc., Harney Basin, Oregon( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Real Property Systems Inc., (RPS) owns two parcels in the vicinity of Harney Lake, Oregon. One parcel is 120 acres in size, the other is 200 acres. A study concludes that the 200 acre parcel has the greater potential for geothermal development. RPS is interested in an aquaculture operation that produces fresh water prawns, (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) for the market. To supply the heat necessary to maintain the ideal temperature of 82°F desired for these prawns, a geothermal resource having a 150°F temperature or higher, is needed. The best estimate is that 150°F water can be found from a minimum 1090 feet depth to 2625 feet, with no absolute assurances that sufficient quantities of geothermal waters exist without drilling for the same. This study undertakes the preliminary determination of project economics so that a decision can be made whether or not to proceed with exploratory drilling. The study is based on 10 acres of ponds, with a peak requirement of 2500 gpm of 150°F geothermal water
Geothermal heating facilities for Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School by Oregon Institute of Technology( Book )

2 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Carson Elementary School and Wind River Middle School are located in Carson, Washington, adjacent to the Wind River. Both schools are operated by the Stevenson-Carson School District. Carson Elementary, comprised of 49,000 square feet, was constructed in several phases beginning in 1951. The construction is variable, but is characterized by large expanses of single glass and uninsulated masonry areas. An oil fired steam boiler supplies a variety of terminal equipment. Wind River Middle School was built in 1972 and, as a result, exhibits much greater insulation levels. The 38,000 square foot structure is heated entirely by an electric resistance terminal reheat system. Carson Hot Springs Resort, located approximately one half mile from the schools, exhibits temperatures of 124°F. In addition, geological work is in progress to better define the local geothermal resource. The feasibility of geothermal use at the school for space heating purposes is examined
Aquifer thermal energy storage for a Medford, Oregon, planned unit development( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A large (950 unit) Planned Unit Development (PUD) is designed for passive solar heating, including a designed roof overhang to allow incoming winter sunlight, and block the sun's summer rays. Additionally, the developers wanted to maximize the use of renewable energy, and they had begun to explore various alternatives, including the use of the available heat in groundwater. Water-to-air heat pumps can utilize ground water as low in temperature as 50/sup 0/F (10/sup 0/C); however, the lower the temperature, the greater the flow of water must be. It was found that an adequate supply of water for this use was not available
Basin View Geothermal Heating District, Klamath Falls, Oregon : conceptual design and economic feasibility study report( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The findings of a feasibility study performed for Basin View Heating District in Klamath Falls, Oregon are reported. The purpose of the study is to determine the physical, economic, and political feasibility of establishing a geothermal heating district to provide space heat to housing units in the Basin View Development of Klamath Falls. Of the several systems considered, all are physically feasible. The project is politically feasible if the owner compiles with governmental requirements. Economic feasibility is based on considerations of money value rates, tax rates and expected rates of return, which are dependent on government and money markets. For analysis a money value rate of 21% and an owner's marginal tax rate of 35% were adopted
Marketing the Klamath Falls geothermal district heating system by Kevin Rafferty( Book )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The new marketing strategy for the Klamath Falls system has concentrated on offering the customer an attractive and easy to understand rate structure, reduced retrofit cost and complexity for his building along with an attractive package of financing and tax credits. Initial retrofit costs and life-cycle cost analysis have been conducted on 22 buildings to date. For some, the retrofit costs are simply too high for the conversion to make sense at current geothermal rates. For many, however, the prospects are good. At this writing, two new customers are now connected and operating with 5 to 8 more buildings committed to connect this construction season after line extensions are completed. This represents nearly a 60% increase in the number of buildings connected to the system and a 40% increase in system revenue
Oregon : a guide to geothermal energy development( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)
Washington : a guide to geothermal energy development( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)
Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, April--June 1993( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Progress is reported on the following R & D activities: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Other activities are reported on technical assistance, technology transfer, and the geothermal progress monitor
Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring
Geothermal resource assessment in Oklahoma : modification of a report prepared for U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, under contract no. DE-AS07-80ID12172, October 1981 by William E Harrison( )

22 editions published between 1981 and 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (<1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program
Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas( )

3 editions published between 1993 and 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it's true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area
Vertical pump turbine oil environmental evaluation by Gene Culver( )

2 editions published between 1991 and 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Oregon low-temperature geothermal injection well construction, siting and receiving formations requires approval by the Water Resources Department (OWRD). In addition, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) has regulations concerning injection. Conversations with the OWRD and ODEQ representatives indicated they were very concerned about the potential for contamination of the geothermal (and cooler but hydraulically connected) aquifers by oils and grease. Their primary concern was over the practice of putting paraffin, motor oils and other hydrocarbons in downhole heat exchanger (DHE) wells to prevent corrosion. They also expressed considerable concern about the use of oil in production well pumps since the fluids pumped would be injected. Oregon (and Idaho) prohibit the use of oil-lubricated pumps for public water supplies except in certain situations where non-toxic food-grade lubricants are used. Since enclosed-lineshaft oil-lubricated pumps are the mainstay of direct-use pumping equipment, the potential for restricting their use became a concern to the Geo-Heat Center staff. An investigation into alternative pump lubrication schemes and development of rebuttals to potential restrictions was proposed and approved as a contract task. (SM)
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H₂S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H₂S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10° or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft² heat transfer surface area
Geothermal energy in Alaska : site data base and development status( )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)
Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H₂S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H₂S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10° or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft² heat transfer surface area
Geothermal energy in Montana : site data base and development status( )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. More specific information is included under the planning regions and site specific data summaries. A brief discussion of the geothermal characteristics and a listing of a majority of the known hot springs is included. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented, including: economics, financing, state leasing, federal leasing, direct-use technology, water quality laws, water rights, and the Major Facility Siting Act. (MHR)
Geothermal space and water heating facilities : Schooler Apartments, Klamath Falls, Oregon by Oregon Institute of Technology( )

3 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The MGM Grand Hotel-Reno is located adjacent to an area with a well-documented geothermal resource. Currently, there is a number of entities seeking to determine the exact nature of the resource at the MGM site. This report concerns itself with identifying current natural gas loads within the MGM complex which could be met by geothermal should a source become available. The two principle assumptions upon which the following material is based are (1) that a source of 190°F or higher temperature water is available and (2) all systems discussed would be installed in parallel with existing systems. That is, existing systems would remain in place providing 100 percent backup for the geothermal systems
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityOregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, Or.). Geo-Heat Utilization Center

Geoheat Center

GHC

Oregon Institute of Technology Geo Heat Center

Languages
English (71)