WorldCat Identities

Sheiner, Louise

Overview
Works: 35 works in 139 publications in 1 language and 655 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HB1, 330
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Louise Sheiner
Demographics and medical care spending : standard and non-standard effects by David M Cutler( Book )

20 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: In this paper, we examine the effects of likely demographic changes on medical spending for the elderly. Standard forecasts highlight the potential for greater life expectancy to increase costs: medical costs generally increase with age, and greater life expectancy means that more of the elderly will be in the older age groups. Two factors work in the other direction, however. First, increases in life expectancy mean that a smaller share of the elderly will be in the last year of life, when medical costs generally are very high. Furthermore, more of the elderly will be dying at older ages, and end-of-life costs typically decline with age at death. Second, disability rates among the surviving population have been declining in recent years by 0.5 to 1.5 percent annually. Reductions in disability, if sustained, will also reduce medical spending. Thus, changes in disability and mortality should, on net, reduce average medical spending on the elderly. However, these effects are not as large as the projected increase in medical spending stemming from increases in overall medical costs. Technological change in medicine at anywhere near its historic rate would still result in a substantial public sector burden for medical costs
Managed care and the growth of medical expenditures by David M Cutler( Book )

12 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: We use data across states to examine the relation between HMO enrollment and medical spending. We find that increased managed care enrollment significantly reduces hospital cost growth. While some of this effect is offset by increased spending on physicians, we generally find a significant reduction in total spending as well. In analyzing the sources of hospital cost reductions, we find preliminary evidence that managed care has reduced the diffusion of medical technologies. States with high managed care enrollment were technology leaders in the early 1980s; by the early 1990s those states were only average in their acquisition of new technologies. This finding suggests managed care may have a significant effect on the long-run growth of medical spending
Policy options for long-term care by David M Cutler( Book )

11 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the effect of government nursing home policies on institutionalization rates and support for the elderly in the community. We combine data from the National Long Term Care Survey with information on state policies to estimate these effects. We examine two state policies for nursing home care: the ability of some high income elderly to receive Medicaid support, and the price differential between Medicaid and the private market. Both policies strongly affect aggregate nursing home utilization. as well as the composition of nursing home residents. In states with more liberal Medicaid rules. the high income elderly are more likely to use a nursing home. while in states with larger underpayments. the poor suffer reduced access. The marginal source of community care for the institutionalized elderly appears to be support from children or other helpers, rather than living alone. Almost all of the elderly in nursing homes would have lived with children or others had they been in the community. In addition, as the ease of acquiring Medicaid increases or Medicaid payments become more generous, fewer elderly receive substantial day-to-day help from their children
The housing wealth of the aged by Louise Sheiner( Book )

11 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the degree to which the elderly reduce homeownership as they age, and the factors which influence this process. We find that average levels of homeownership decline significantly with age, even when cohort effects are taken into consideration, and that the amount of housing held by people near death is quite low compared to what is seen in cross sections. We estimate that 42% of households will leave behind a house when the last member dies. We also find that the degree to which households reduce homeownership between age 65 and death does not differ greatly between the upper and lower income halves of our sample; that people who do not have children reduce their homeownership more slowly than those who do; that increases in house prices in a state make it more likely that the elderly in that state reduce their home equity; and that the value of houses sold by elderly people tends not remain in their portfolios after the house is sold
An Aging Society by David M Cutler( )

2 editions published in 1996 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

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Health care costs, wages, and aging by Louise Sheiner( Book )

7 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The geography of medicare by David M Cutler( Book )

7 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Should America save for its old age? : population aging, national saving, and fiscal policy by Douglas W Elmendorf( Book )

6 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Generational aspects of Medicare by David M Cutler( Book )

6 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The sustainability of health spending growth by Glenn Follette( Book )

5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The household spending response to the 2003 tax cut : evidence from survey data by Julia Lynn Coronado( Book )

4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jobs and Growth Tax Relief and Reconciliation Act of 2003 has been described as textbook fiscal stimulus. Using household survey data on the self-reported qualitative response to the tax cuts, we estimate that the boost to aggregate personal consumption expenditures from the child credit rebate and the reduction in withholdings raised the average level of real GDP in the second half of 2003 by 0.2 percent and by 0.3 percent in the first half of 2004. We also show that households in the survey were well aware of their tax cuts and tended to spend equally out of the child credit rebate and the reduced withholdings, a result that is contrary to the conventional wisdom
The fiscal stress arising from state and local retiree health obligations by Byron F Lutz( Book )

5 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A major factor weighing down the long-term finances of state and local governments is the obligation to fund retiree benefits. While state and local government pension obligations have been analyzed in great detail, much less attention has been paid to the costs of the other major retiree benefit provided by these governments: retiree health insurance. The first portion of the paper uses the information contained in the annual actuarial reports for public retiree health plans to reverse engineer the cash flows underlying the liabilities given in the report. Obtaining the cash flows allows us to construct liability estimates which are consistent across governments in terms of the discount rate, actuarial method and assumptions concerning medical cost inflation and mortality. We find that the total unfunded accrued liability of state and local governments for the provision of retiree health care exceeds $1 trillion, or about? of total state and local government revenue. Relative to pension obligations discounted at the same rate, we find that unfunded retiree health care liabilities are ư the size of unfunded pension obligations. We also find that using assumptions concerning the growth in health care costs that are arguably more realistic than those employed by most states actually reduces the size of the liability in most cases. Pushing in the opposite direction, we find that using plausibly more realistic mortality assumptions increases the size of liability. The second portion of the paper places retiree health care obligations into context by examining the budget pressures associated with retiree health on a continuing, largely pay-as-you go basis. We find that much of the projected increase in retiree health obligations as a share of revenue is the result of health care cost growth. On average, states could put their retiree health obligations into long-run fiscal balance by contributing an additional ℓ percent of total revenue toward the benefit each year. There is, however, wide variation across the states, with the majority of states requiring little in the way of additional financing, but some states requiring a significantly larger increase
A primer on the macroeconomic implications of population aging by Louise Sheiner( Book )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of technology on the age distribution of health spending : a cross-country perspective by Louise Sheiner( Book )

6 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The conventional method used to project a country's future health care expenditures is to assume that relative health spending by age remains constant. This method has been criticized as being too pessimistic, on the one hand, because of continued improvements in the health status of older people, and as too optimistic, on the other, because of the effects of technological innovations on increasing health spending on the elderly relative to the nonelderly. This paper uses cross-country data to shed light on this question. I find that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the theoretical effects of technology on health spending are to decrease the concentration of health spending on the elderly. Empirically, I find that relative health spending by age has been quite stable over time. I also find that countries with the most technologically intensive health sectors spend relatively less on the oldest old compared to the younger old"--Federal Reserve Board web site
Should America save for its old age? : fiscal policy, population aging, and national saving by Douglas W Elmendorf( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An aging society : opportunity or challenge by David M Cutler( Book )

3 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Housing considerations and life-cycle decisions by Louise Sheiner( Book )

3 editions published between 1993 and 1996 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent trends in compensation practices by David Lebow( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why the geographic variation in health care spending can't tell us much about the efficiency or quality of our health care system by Louise Sheiner( Book )

2 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How the Growing Gap in Life Expectancy May Affect Retirement Benefits and Reforms by Alan J Auerbach( )

3 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Older Americans have experienced dramatic gains in life expectancy in recent decades, but an emerging literature reveals that these gains are accumulating mostly to those at the top of the income distribution. We explore how growing inequality in life expectancy affects lifetime benefits from Social Security, Medicare, and other programs and how this phenomenon interacts with possible program reforms. We first project that life expectancy at age 50 for males in the two highest income quintiles will rise by 7 to 8 years between the 1930 and 1960 birth cohorts, but that the two lowest income quintiles will experience little to no increase over that time period. This divergence in life expectancy will cause the gap between average lifetime program benefits received by men in the highest and lowest quintiles to widen by $130,000 (in $2009) over this period. Finally we simulate the effect of Social Security reforms such as raising the normal retirement age and changing the benefit formula to see whether they mitigate or enhance the reduced progressivity resulting from the widening gap in life expectancy
 
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Alternative Names
Sheiner, Louise M.

Languages
English (121)