WorldCat Identities

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 711 works in 1,317 publications in 2 languages and 65,411 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Periodicals  Conference papers and proceedings 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (U.S.)
Join the voices for recovery : now more than ever!( )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 568 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Includes resources which provide guidance and ideas for potential partners in planning events for National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month as well as ideas to help raise awareness year-round
Improving treatment for drug-exposed infants by Stephen R Kandall( Book )

7 editions published between 1993 and 2004 in English and held by 559 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Substance abuse treatment for persons with child abuse and neglect issues by Judy Howard( )

7 editions published between 1999 and 2008 in English and held by 556 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This TIP, Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Child Abuse and Neglect Issues, examines treatment issues for both adult survivors of child abuse or neglect and adults in treatment who may be abusing or neglecting their own children. Chapters 1 through 3 focus primarily on adult survivors of child abuse and neglect. Chapter 1 defines child abuse and neglect, provides rates of child abuse and neglect both in the general population and among those in substance abuse treatment, and reviews the literature on links between childhood abuse and subsequent substance abuse. Chapter 2 describes screening and assessment tools that can be used to determine whether a client has a history of childhood abuse or neglect; Chapter 3 presents guidelines on treating clients with histories of child abuse or neglect and referring them to mental health care treatment when necessary. Chapter 4 discusses the personal issues counselors may encounter (e.g., countertransference) when working with clients with histories of abuse or neglect and offers suggestions for addressing them. In Chapters 5 and 6, the focus shifts to adults in treatment who may be abusing or neglecting their own children. Chapter 5 shows how alcohol and drug counselors can identify whether their clients are at risk of or are currently abusing or neglecting their children. It discusses what alcohol and drug counselors can do to break the cycle of child abuse and neglect, including how to work with child protective service agencies within the child welfare system. Chapter 6 is an overview of the legal issues that counselors should be aware of as mandated reporters. The TIP concludes with an overview in Chapter 7 of continuing and emerging trends, such as fast-track adoption and welfare reform, that counselors will need to follow in the coming years
Substance abuse treatment for persons with HIV/AIDS by Steven L Batki( )

7 editions published between 2000 and 2009 in English and held by 543 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The TIP is organized into ten chapters, the first of which provides an introduction to HIV/AIDS, including the origin, life cycle, and progression of the disease. The second part of Chapter 1 provides an overview of the changes in epidemiology since 1995 when the first edition of this TIP was published. Epidemiological data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are summarized, and readers are provided with an overview of the pandemic in the regions of the United States, the current trends and populations most affected by the disease, and a discussion of special populations. Chapter 2, which is targeted to medical personnel, discusses the medical assessment and treatment of HIV/AIDS, including adherence to treatment, barriers to care, treatment and testing, pharmacology, and prophylaxis against opportunistic infections. Chapter 3, which is aimed at mental health workers, explores the mental health treatment of clients with substance abuse problems and HIV/AIDS and discusses common mental disorders, assessment and diagnosis, pharmacology, counseling, and staff issues. Chapter 4 presents issues concerning HIV prevention. These issues include assessing clients for risk, risk-reduction counseling, sexual risk reduction, prenatal and perinatal prevention, transmission of resistant strains of HIV, syringe sharing, rapid HIV testing, and infection control issues for programs. Chapter 5 discusses integrating treatment services, as well as the importance of linkages between substance abuse treatment programs and other providers. Chapter 6 provides information about case management and finding resources for HIV-infected substance abusers, including resources for substance abuse treatment, mental health, medical care, and income and other financial concerns for clients. Chapter 7 examines counseling issues, including staff training and attitudes, screening, and issues specific to the substance-abusing client with HIV/AIDS. Chapter 8 explores ethical issues, and Chapter 9 discusses legal issues and provides basic information about Federal laws regarding discrimination and confidentiality. Chapter 10, geared toward program administrators, presents information about funding sources and grantwriting. In light of the volumes of information available about HIV/AIDS, this TIP is not intended to be exhaustive. A wide array of resources is provided for those who wish to find more information on topics of interest. The appendixes in this TIP provide additional information on several topics and include the 1993 Revised Classification System for HIV and AIDS, Federal and State codes of ethics, AIDS-related Web sites, and a list of State and Territorial health agencies and AIDS hotlines
Assessment and treatment of patients with coexisting mental illness and alcohol and other drug abuse by Richard Ries( Book )

5 editions published between 1994 and 1999 in English and held by 535 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Enhancing motivation for change in substance abuse treatment by William R Miller( )

8 editions published between 1999 and 2009 in English and held by 518 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Programa para el manejo del enojo en clientes con problemas de abuso de sustancias y trastornos de salud mental : cuaderno de ejercicios para el participante by Patrick Reilly( )

5 editions published between 2006 and 2014 in Spanish and held by 517 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Combining substance abuse treatment with intermediate sanctions for adults in the criminal justice system by Robert B Aukerman( Book )

7 editions published between 1994 and 2004 in English and held by 487 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Substance abuse in brief( )

in English and held by 483 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Welfare reform and substance abuse treatment confidentiality : general guidance for reconciling need to know and privacy( )

4 editions published between 1999 and 2003 in English and held by 430 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Substance abuse among older adults by Frederic C Blow( Book )

6 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and held by 422 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A provider's introduction to substance abuse treatment for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals( Book )

4 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 406 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Confidentiality of patient records for alcohol and other drug treatment by Felix Lopez( )

10 editions published between 1994 and 2002 in English and held by 405 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Naltrexone and alcoholism treatment by Stephanie S O'Malley( )

7 editions published between 1998 and 2005 in English and held by 401 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS. Psychosocial treatments for alcoholism have been shown to increase abstinence rates and improve the quality of life for many alcoholics. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of alcoholics find it difficult to maintain initial treatment gains and eventually relapse to problematic drinking. Some of these individuals can now be helped with naltrexone, an opiate antagonist recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat alcohol abuse disorders. When used as an adjunct to psychosocial therapies for alcohol-dependent or alcohol-abusing patients, naltrexone can reduce (1) The percentage of days spent drinking (2) The amount of alcohol consumed on a drinking occasion (3) Relapse to excessive and destructive drinking. This TIP will help clinicians and treatment providers use naltrexone safely and effectively to enhance patient care and improve treatment outcomes. Naltrexone therapy improves treatment outcomes when added to other components of alcoholism treatment. For patients who are motivated to take the medication, naltrexone is an important and valuable tool. In many patients, a short regimen of naltrexone will provide a critical period of sobriety, during which the patient learns to stay sober without it
National Conference on Marijuana Use: Prevention, Treatment, and Research : conference highlights : July 19 & 20, 1995, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia by Treatment, and Research National Conference on Marijuana Use: Prevention( Book )

4 editions published between 1996 and 2000 in English and held by 373 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Treatment for alcohol and other drug abuse : opportunities for coordination by Ann H Crowe( Book )

4 editions published between 1994 and 2002 in English and held by 365 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Substance abuse among older adults : physician's guide by Saul M Levin( Book )

5 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and held by 356 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Treatment of adolescents with substance use disorders by Ken C Winters( Book )

13 editions published between 1999 and 2008 in English and held by 345 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS. This document, Treatment of Adolescents With Substance Use Disorders, is a revision and update of Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 4, published in 1993 by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Like TIP 4, this document aims to help treatment providers design and deliver better services to adolescent clients with substance use disorders. In 1992, CSAT convened a Consensus Panel of experts on adolescent substance use disorder treatment to produce guidelines for treatment programs on designing and delivering effective services to adolescent clients. The clients addressed in the TIP included, among others, young people involved with the juvenile and criminal justice systems. CSAT also intended for the Panel's guidelines to help governmental agencies and treatment providers establish, fund, operate, monitor, and evaluate treatment programs for substance-using adolescents. The result of that Panel's work was TIP 4, Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol- and Other Drug-Abusing Adolescents. In July 1997, CSAT convened a small Revision Panel to review TIP 4. The Panel recommended changes and developed content for this revised TIP. Since the publication of TIP 4, the understanding of substance use disorders and its treatment among adolescents has advanced. More is known today about the immediate and long-term physiologic, behavioral, and social consequences of use, abuse, and dependency. New research attention has begun to examine the effectiveness of various treatment methods and components that meet the specific treatment needs of substance-using adolescents, and this literature is reviewed. However, the literature is small. Fortunately, a large multisite, national study on the effectiveness of treatment for adolescent substance users is underway with funds from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. CSAT is also conducting studies on adolescents, focusing on marijuana treatment, diversion programs in the juvenile justice system (JJS), and exemplary treatment programs. The field will likely mature greatly by the knowledge advanced from these studies. The structure of the earlier TIP of separate inpatient and outpatient treatment chapters, which represented a continuum of service intensity, was viewed by the Revision Panel to be less central to treatment decisions than a continuum based on the severity of the substance use disorder. This shift in focus better reflects clinical experience, extant treatment research, and the recent changes regarding reimbursement by health care payors for treatment. However, the Revision Panel retained a broad definition of treatment. Treatment is defined in this TIP as those activities that might be undertaken to deal with problem(s) associated with substance involvement and with individuals manifesting a substance use disorder. Although the Panel recognizes that primary or secondary prevention of substance use are included in expanded definitions of treatment, the Panel limited the continuum of interventions to what is traditionally viewed as acute intervention, rehabilitation, and maintenance. The elements of the continuum primarily reflect the treatment philosophies of providers, with less emphasis on settings and modalities. In addition to defining the treatment needs of adolescents and providing a full description of the use of the severity continuum, the Revision Panel focused attention on three common types of treatment for adolescents today: 12-Step-based treatment, treatment in the adolescent therapeutic community, and family therapy. The 12-Step model lies at the heart of many adolescent treatment programs. Therapeutic communities (TCs) are an intensive type of residential treatment that is attracting attention as a preferred approach for substance-using juveniles incarcerated in the justice system. Clinicians have found that effective treatment of the adolescent almost always involves the family, and the effectiveness of family therapy has been documented extensively, particularly among those substance-using adolescents who are normally the most difficult to treat. This revision of the earlier TIP, then, offers guidelines for using the severity continuum to make treatment decisions and for providing three common models of treatment for adolescents with substance use disorders. Recommendations of the Revision Panel, supported by extensive clinical experience and the literature, are summarized below. The organization of this TIP reflects the core facets of initiating, engaging, and maintaining the change process for youths with substance use disorders. Chapter 1 details the scope and complexity of the problem. Chapter 2 covers factors considered in making treatment decisions, and Chapter 3 details the features of successful programs. Chapters 4, 5, and 6 introduce and describe the treatment approaches used in 12-Step-based treatment, therapeutic communities, and family therapy, respectively. Chapter 7 discusses adolescents with distinctive treatment needs, such as youths involved in the juvenile justice system, homeless and runaway youth, and youth with coexisting disorders. Chapter 8 describes the legal and ethical issues that relate to diagnosis and treatment of adolescents. This new TIP derives from CSAT's intention to provide protocols that reflect the work now being done by providers of high-quality treatment. As with other TIPs, this document brings the best knowledge from the field to State and local treatment programs. In order to avoid awkward construction and sexism, this TIP alternates between "he" and "she" for generic examples. The companion document, TIP 31, Screening and Assessing Adolescents for Substance Use Disorders, a revision of TIP 3, has also been published (CSAT, 1999)
Comprehensive case management for substance abuse treatment by Harvey A Siegal( )

8 editions published between 1998 and 2009 in English and held by 344 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

50 strategies for substance abuse treatment by Barry S Brown( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 337 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Combining substance abuse treatment with intermediate sanctions for adults in the criminal justice system
Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States. Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration. Office for Treatment Improvement

controlled identityUnited States. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

C.S.A.T. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (U.S.))

CSAT

CSAT (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (U.S.))

Forente stater Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

Forente stater Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

National Evaluation Data Services NEDS

United States Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

Languages
English (118)

Spanish (5)

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