WorldCat Identities

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

Overview
Works: 199 works in 318 publications in 1 language and 14,854 library holdings
Classifications: TL521.3.T4,
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Most widely held works about NASA Dryden Flight Research Center
 
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Most widely held works by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center
Nonstationary dynamics data analysis with wavelet-SVD filtering by Marty Brenner( Book )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

F/A-18A inlet flow characteristics during maneuvers with rapidly changing angle of attack : contract NAS 3-26617 by Andrew J Yuhas( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 93 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The performance and distortion levels of the right inlet of the F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle were assessed during maneuvers with rapidly changing angle-of-attack at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The distortion levels were compared with those produced by current inlet-engine compatibility evaluation techniques. The objective of these analyses was to determine whether the results obtained for steady aerodynamic conditions were adequate to describe the inlet-generated distortion levels that occur during rapid aircraft maneuvers. The test data were obtained during 46 dynamic maneuvers at Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.4. Levels of inlet recovery, peak dynamic circumferential distortion, and peak dynamic radial distortion of dynamic maneuvers for a General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofan engine were compared with estimations based on steady aerodynamic conditions. The comparisons were performed at equivalent angle-of-attack, angle-of-sideslip, and Mach number. Results showed no evidence of peak inlet distortion levels being elevated by dynamic maneuver conditions at high angle-of-attack compared with steady aerodynamic estimations. During sweeps into high angle-of-attack, the peak distortion levels of the dynamic maneuvers rarely rose to steady aerodynamic estimations. The dynamic maneuvers were shown to be effective at identifying conditions when discrete changes in inlet behavior occur
Evaluation of high-angle-of-attack handling qualities for the X-31A using standard evaluation maneuvers by P. C Stoliker( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30° and 70°. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level 1/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level 1/Level 2 ratings below 45° angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine-tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30° angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50°. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal-Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications
Inlet distortion for an F/A-18A aircraft during steady aerodynamic conditions up to 60 ̊angle of attack : contract NAS 3-26617 by Kevin R Walsh( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of high-angle-of-attack flight on aircraft inlet aerodynamic characteristics were investigated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program. The highly instrumented F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle was used for this research. A newly designed inlet total-pressure rake was installed in front of the starboard F404-GE-400 engine to measure inlet recovery and distortion characteristics. One objective was to determine inlet total-pressure characteristics at steady high-angle-of-attack conditions. Other objectives include assessing whether significant differences exist in inlet distortion between rapid angle-of-attack maneuvers and corresponding steady aerodynamic conditions, assessing inlet characteristics during aircraft departures, providing data for developing and verifying computational fluid dynamic codes, and calculating engine airflow using five methods. This paper addresses the first objective by summarizing results of 79 flight maneuvers at steady aerodynamic conditions, ranging from -10º to 60º angle of attack and from -8º to 11º angle of sideslip at Mach 0.3 and 0.4. These data and the associated database have been rigorously validated to establish a foundation for understanding inlet characteristics at high angle of attack
[Flight and static exhaust flow properties of an F110-GE-129 engine in an F-16XL airplane during acoustic tests] by Jon K Holzman( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The exhaust flow properties (mass flow, pressure, temperature, velocity, and Mach number) of the F110-GE-129 engine in an F-16XL airplane were determined from a series of flight tests flown at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. These tests were performed in conjunction with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (LaRC) as part of a study to investigate the acoustic characteristics of jet engines operating at high nozzle pressure conditions. The range of interest for both objectives was from Mach 0.3 to Mach 0.9. NASA Dryden flew the airplane and acquired and analyzed the engine data to determine the exhaust characteristics. NASA Langley collected the flyover acoustic measurements and correlated these results with their current predictive codes. This paper describes the airplane, tests, and methods used to determine the exhaust flow properties and presents the exhaust flow properties. No acoustics results are presented
Dynamic ground effect for a cranked arrow wing airplane by Robert E Curry( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Structural dynamic model obtained from flight use with piloted simulation and handling qualities analysis by Bruce G Powers( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The F/A-18 high-angle-of-attack ground-to-flight correlation : lessons learned by Daniel W Banks( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Flight demonstration of a shock location sensor using constant voltage hot-film anemometry by Timothy R Moes( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Finite-element analysis of a Mach-8 flight test article using nonlinear contact elements by W. Lance Richards( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An overview of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle by Albion H Bowers( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

STARS, an integrated, multidisciplinary, finite-element, structural, fluids, aeroelastic, and aeroservoelastic analysis computer program by Kajal K Gupta( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A model for Space Shuttle orbiter tire side forces based on NASA Landing Systems Research Aircraft test results by John F Carter( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exploring the Extreme: High Performance Learning Activities in Mathematics, Science and Technology( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"The many activities contained in this teaching guide emphasize hands-on involvement, prediction, data collection and interpretation, teamwork, and problem solving. The guide also contains background information about aeronautical research that can help students learn how airplanes fly."--Page 1
A conversion of wheatstone bridge to current-loop signal conditioning for strain gages by Karl F Anderson( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Current loop circuitry replaced Wheatstone bridge circuitry to signal-condition strain gage transducers in more than 350 data channels for two different test programs at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The uncorrected test data from current loop circuitry had a lower noise level than data from comparable Wheatstone bridge circuitry, were linear with respect to gage-resistance change, and were uninfluenced by varying lead-wire resistance. The current loop channels were easier for the technicians to set up, verify, and operate than equivalent Wheatstone bridge channels. Design choices and circuit details are presented in this paper in addition to operational experience
Supersonic flying qualities experience using the SR-71 by Timothy H Cox( )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Approximately 25 years ago NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, initiated the evaluation of supersonic handling qualities issues using the XB-70 and the YF-12. Comparison of pilot comments and ratings with some of the classical handling qualities criteria for transport aircraft provided information on the usefulness of these criteria and insight into supersonic flying qualities issues. A second research study has recently been completed which again addressed supersonic flying qualities issues through evaluations of the SR-71 in flight at Mach 3. Additional insight into supersonic flying qualities issues was obtained through pilot ratings and comments. These ratings were compared with existing military specifications and proposed criteria for the High Speed Civil Transport. This paper investigates the disparity between pilot comments and the Neal/Smith criteria through a modification of the technique using vertical speed at the pilot station. The paper specifically addresses the pilot ability to control flightpath and pitch attitude in supersonic flight and pilot displays typical of supersonic maneuvering
Large-deformation displacement transfer functions for shape predictions of highly flexible slender aerospace structures by William L Ko( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

CFD analysis of nozzle jet plume effects on sonic boom signature by Trong T Bui( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A computational fluid dynamics study is conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock research airplane, is considered. The computational fluid dynamics code is validated using available wind-tunnel sonic boom experimental data. The effects of grid size, spacial order of accuracy, grid type, and flow viscosity on the accuracy of the predicted sonic boom pressure signature are quantified. Grid lines parallel to the Mach wave direction are found to give the best results. Second-order accurate upwind methods are required as a minimum for accurate sonic boom simulations. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics simulations show the flow physics inside the F-15 nozzle to be nonisentropic and complex
Coherent lidar turbulence measurement for gust load alleviation by David Soreide( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Atmospheric turbulence adversely affects operation of commercial and military aircraft and is a design constraint. The airplane structure must be designed to survive the loads imposed by turbulence. Reducing these loads allows the airplane structure to be lighter, a substantial advantage for a commercial airplane. Gust alleviation systems based on accelerometers mounted in the airplane can reduce the maximum gust loads by a small fraction. These systems still represent an economic advantage. The ability to reduce the gust load increases tremendously if the turbulent gust can be measured before the airplane encounters it. A lidar system can make measurements of turbulent gusts ahead of the airplane, and the NASA Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) program is developing such a lidar. The ACLAIM program is intended to develop a prototype lidar system for use in feasibility testing of gust load alleviation systems and other airborne lidar applications, to define applications of lidar with the potential for improving airplane performance, and to determine the feasibility and benefits of these applications. This paper gives an overview of the ACLAIM program, describes the lidar architecture for a gust alleviation system, and describes the prototype ACLAIM lidar system
Method for estimating operational loads on aerospace structures using span-wisely distributed surface strains by William L Ko( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityDryden Flight Research Facility

controlled identityNASA Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center

Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center

Spojené státy americké. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dryden Flight Research Center

Languages
English (67)

Covers
Computers take flight : a history of NASA's pioneering digital fly-by-wire project