WorldCat Identities

ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education

Overview
Works: 310 works in 396 publications in 1 language and 10,294 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education
Positive Character Development in School Sport Programs by Jennifer Marie Beller( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 204 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest discusses the formal and informal processes of moral character development through sport in light of the types of programs that have shown to improve moral character, sportsmanship, and fair play, noting that such efforts involve combined lifelong formal and informal educational processes with three interrelated dimensions: knowing, valuing, and doing the right thing. Informal moral character development is highly influenced by the environment, as well as the mass media. Typical programs take advantage of teachable moments. Role modeling as an informal process of character education holds that leaders take responsibility for their actions and demonstrate good character. The formal process of character education is a direct and purposeful intent to affect character development, with individuals challenged to reflect upon moral issues, values, and principles in relationship to others and society, translating those reflections into good moral action. Formal character education can involve extensive study whereby athletes are challenged by peers, instructors, and themselves through reading, writing, discussion, and reflection on issues of honesty, fair play, responsibility, and decency toward others. Less time-intensive programs involve education through training videos. In contrast to informal programs, formal moral education programs are more difficult and time intensive to implement. (Contains 23 references.) (SM)
Understanding and Preventing Teacher Burnout by Teri Wood( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest explains that burnout results from the chronic perception that one is unable to cope with daily life demands. Teachers must face classrooms full of students every day; negotiate potentially stressful interactions with parents, administrators, counselors, and other teachers; contend with relatively low pay and shrinking school budgets; and ensure students meet increasingly strict standards. This can result in a form of burnout at some point in their careers. The digest looks at the nature of the stress response, describes the development of the burnout construct, and examines several types of prevention that can be useful in helping teachers contend with an occupation that puts them at risk for burnout. Primary prevention includes organizational practices which allow teachers some control over their daily challenges. Secondary prevention focuses on early detection of problems before they emerge as full-blown disorders. Tertiary prevention involves ameliorating symptoms of burnout. The digest concludes that primary prevention is preferable, but all types can be effective. (Contains 19 references.) (SM)
National Standards for Athletic Coaches by Jody A Brylinsky( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest asserts that the question of coach preparation and training has become a priority issue for many schools and communities, though the research is limited. It examines reasons to have coach education; the scope of sport participation; the status of coach education and training in the United States; National standards for coach education; and the national standard/domains for coaching education. The National Standards for Athletic Coaches (NSAC) document contains 37 standards grouped into eight domains of knowledge and ability: injury prevention, care, and management; risk management; growth, development, and learning; training, conditioning, and nutrition; social/psychological aspects; skills, tactics, and strategies; teaching and administration, and professional preparation and development. The digest asserts that establishment and support of national standards for coach education provides the core for an integrated system of preparing qualified coaches. National standards assure the public that professional preparation meets the critical needs of its constituency. Established standards foster continued improvement in the content and delivery of professional curricula and in the selection, guidance, supervision, and assessment of the professional preparation of coaches. The establishment of NSAC provides a consistent framework from which coach educators and coaching practitioners may establish accountability and credibility in the coaching profession. (Contains 14 references.) (SM)
Professional Development of Principals by Leslie T Fenwick( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 202 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contemporary models of school reform acknowledge the principal as the passport to school success and the manager of an increasingly complex organization. This digest asserts that principals benefit from professional development that examines best practices, provides coaching support, encourages risk taking designed to improve student learning, cultivates team relationships, and provides quality time for reflection and renewal. Three different philosophical orientations guide the education and professional development of principals: traditional/scientific management, which exposes the principal to the research base on management and the behavioral sciences; craft, in which principals are trained by other experienced professionals; and reflective inquiry, in which the principal is encouraged to generate knowledge through a process of systematic inquiry. The principals' center model reflects the best of each approach, providing opportunities for principals to explore and reflect on current school and leadership topics. The digest notes that if the education change of the new millennium is to deliver on the promise of a quality education for all children, then a different understanding should guide principals' preparation and professional development. Embracing a social reconstructionist orientation toward principal preparation and development would encourage school leaders to create greater equality and social justice both in schools and in the larger community. (Contains 17 references.) (SM)
The National Council on Teacher Quality Expanding the Teacher Quality Discussion by Thomas Suh( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 202 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research suggests that teacher quality is the single most important factor in determining student achievement and that the impact of a teacher is cumulative. Students with less exposure to qualified teachers are far less likely to achieve academic success than students with more exposure. Research also shows that teachers majoring in the subject areas taught have a more positive impact on student achievement than teachers majoring in out-of-field disciplines. Yet teacher certification in many states does not require subject area expertise. Some states and universities have seriously begun examining this issue, exploring initiatives to align student academic content standards with teacher licensure and involving liberal arts faculty in developing teacher training curricula. The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) is committed to improving teacher quality by promoting public awareness of scientifically based teacher quality strategies and market-based initiatives and encouraging reforms that lead to measurable gains in student achievement. NCTQ's efforts to fulfill its mission include: publishing materials that address teacher quality issues, maintaining an online teacher quality information clearinghouse, and helping states, districts, and colleges improve teacher quality. It is also working to develop a national teacher certification board, the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence. (Contains 11 references.) (SM)
Telecommunications Distance Learning and Teacher Preparation by Maryellen Smith Cosgrove( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest focuses on the advantages of distance learning (DL) in teacher preparation, explaining that teacher candidates need to be ready to embrace rapidly changing technologies throughout their careers. Teacher education programs can extend the traditional uses of DL by bringing campus-based courses into school-based classrooms, expanding clinical experiences to a variety of settings, and requiring teacher candidates to team teach with distant teachers to reach more students in diverse settings. The digest discusses linking theory with practice, linking teacher candidates with supervisors, and linking teacher candidates with peers, then focuses on challenges and guidelines to using DL in teacher preparation, including: carefully consider materials, aids, and strategies; immediately establish a rapport among all students and teachers; use a variety of techniques throughout the lesson; provide interactive opportunities with the instructor and other students at all sites; use feedback to maintain motivation and correct misconceptions and monitor student learning; use both summarization and closure techniques to continuously review key points of the lesson; frequently look into the camera to make eye contact with distance learners; use precise enunciation and articulation; and ensure coordination between sites. (Contains 18 references.) (SM)
Selecting and Retaining Teacher Mentors by Bonnie B Mullinix( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest examines considerations and strategies for selecting and retaining teacher mentors, suggesting that the degree to which mentors are meaningfully engaged in the mentoring process may have a significant impact on a program's success. Strategies for recruiting mentors range from opportunistic appointment to promoting self-nomination to tying mentorship status to a developmental career ladder. Various programs identify selection strategies based on their vision of the purposes of mentoring and factors they most wish to promote. One of the most influential criteria for mentor selection is their reputation as effective classroom teachers. There is little documentation of strategies utilized to retain mentors. Some appropriate strategies include recognizing mentor expertise and acknowledging and compensating mentors' contribution to the professional development of new teachers. It is important to appropriately match mentors to proteges. This matching can impact retention of both teachers and mentors. Ongoing support and training designed specifically for mentors often serves as an important mechanism for retaining mentors. Mentor compensation can include stipends paid directly to mentors; release time; allocations of funds to schools and districts to support associated implementation costs; additional classroom assistance and support; and financial support for and priority access to professional development. (Contains 22 references.) (SM)
Multiple Points of Entry into Teaching for Urban Communities by Linda Post( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Today's teachers shortage is most severe in urban districts, which struggle to recruit and retain new teachers and face persistent gaps between white, middle class teachers and diverse students. Teachers' lack of cultural and linguistic familiarity in such situations can be damaging to the goal of ensuring that all children achieve to their potential. The digest suggests that traditional recruitment strategies in teacher education alone are insufficient to meet this ongoing need. It recommends supporting a wide range of pipelines for those in the community who wish to become teachers. The digest examines: the concept of multiple entry points into teaching; the role of the P-16 council, which can help facilitate widespread knowledge of the multiple pathways available; support for multiple entry points; and supporting a diverse teaching workforce (a major strategy of the multiple entry points approach is the recruitment of incumbent workers, who are already committed to education and who tend to be minorities). The digest concludes that the design and delivery of preservice programs of the highest quality is essential, which means taking standards seriously, challenging programs to improve, and communicating clearly to all potential students, from every pipeline, what it means to be a good teacher for urban education. (Contains 26 references.) (SM)
The Preparation and Professional Development of Teachers of English Language Learners by Beth Antunez( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The population of school-aged English language learners (ELLs) has consistently and significantly increased over the past decade, transforming U.S. public schools, instruction, and teacher preparation. This digest discusses the need for increased numbers of teachers of ELLs and the particular linguistic and academic characteristics of ELLs. It focuses on: teacher supply and demand (the need for teachers of ELLs is particularly acute, and while percent of U.S. teachers have taught ELLs, less than 13 percent have received any training or professional development in the area); requirements for preparing teachers of ELLs (bilingual education, English as a Second Language, and mainstream education); and addressing the need (several organizations have developed standards to delineate what teachers of ELLs should know and be able to do, and these standards include such elements as proficiency in two languages, understanding of the impact of students' cultures on their learning, and assisting students in the development of their language abilities). The digest concludes that efforts are now being concentrated in the implementation of programs that incorporate the elements of effective preparation and professional development of teachers of ELLs. (Contains 14 references.) (SM)
School-based sex education : a new millennium update by J. Terry Parker( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest addresses the need for school-based sex education (SBSE), identifying recent curricula that have made a positive difference in the lives of U.S. youth. Many sexual behaviors place U.S. youth at great risk for a multitude of negative health outcomes. Every year, approximately 3 million adolescents acquire a sexually transmitted disease, with HIV infection and AIDS the greatest threat. Currently, SBSE programs are grounded in science and psychosocial theory and have been rigorously evaluated. Specific characteristics that make them effective include: giving a clear message about sexual activity and condom/contraceptive use and continually reinforcing that message, and incorporating behavioral goals, teaching methods, and materials that are appropriate to students' age, sexual experience, and culture. The abstinence-only-until-marriage movement gained momentum with a 1996 Congressional Act allocating $250 million over 5 years to fund state abstinence education programs. Few evaluations of abstinence-only programs have occurred, and the available studies are inconclusive. The digest concludes that schools and communities must acknowledge that most youth will be sexually active before high school graduation and must respond proactively by providing students with the comprehensive sex education curricula needed to prevent detrimental outcomes. (Contains 17 references.) (SM)
Licensure programs for paraeducators by Segun C Eubanks( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest examines the qualities that make paraeducators good candidates for teaching, particularly in diverse, urban schools. It discusses the critical aspects of programs that prepare paraeducators as classroom teachers. Paraeducators and other education support personnel (ESP) already have classroom experience, are more likely to live in the community where they work, often have significant experience working in public schools, and are often minority group members. When trained as teachers, they tend to stay in the classroom longer and achieve at higher levels than teachers from traditional teacher preparation programs. Barriers that paraeducators and other ESP face in achieving teacher certification include financial constraints, family considerations, time limitations, and institutional barriers. Key components of effective paraeducator-to-teacher programs include: strong collaboration between a local school district that employs paraeducators and a nearby university; a recruitment and selection process that gives an active role to partnering school districts; admissions criteria that blend traditional and nontraditional measures; teacher preparation curriculum that fits the needs of program participants; comprehensive academic and social support for participants; and tuition and other financial assistance. (Contains 18 references.) (SM)
Children and post traumatic stress disorder : what classroom teachers should know by Susan J Grosse( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Children may be exposed to trauma in their personal lives or at school. Teachers can prepare children to cope with trauma by understanding the nature of trauma, teaching skills for responding to emergencies, and learning how to mitigate the after-effects of trauma. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has specific characteristics and circumstances, including situations perceived as life-threatening, outside the scope of normal life experiences, involving death, and during which children experience total loss of control. Survival skills include being able to follow directions, get help, mitigate specific emergencies, report circumstances, and say no firmly. Implementing survival skills requires recognizing right from wrong. Teachers can take steps to prepare children ahead of time and lessen the PTSD potential (teaching about trauma, teaching survival skills, debriefing after a trauma, and helping children regain control). Symptoms of PTSD include re-experiencing an event, avoiding reminders of the event, sleep disturbance, and continual thought pattern interruptions around the event. Diagnosing PTSD requires evaluation by trained mental health professionals. Teachers have a role in identifying and referring students. Teachers can help children suspected of PTSD by discouraging reliance on avoidance, talking about feelings, encouraging return to normal activities, and seeking professional help. (17 additional resources are listed.) (SM)
Multicultural education and technology : perfect pair or odd couple? by Patricia L Marshall( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest examines how technology can support multicultural education. Multicultural education represents an approach to education and the teaching-learning process that is grounded in the democratic ideals of justice and equality. Five critical dimensions of multicultural education are: content integration, knowledge construction, prejudice reduction, equity pedagogy, and empowering school culture and social structure. Content integration is intended to expand the curriculum by incorporating contributions of diverse cultures into traditional disciplines of study. Knowledge construction promotes critical literacy by making explicit the manners in which scholars and scientists contribute to their respective fields of study. Prejudice reduction is about eliminating all forms of bigotry and involves promoting healthy personal identity devoid of the tendency to need to denigrate those who differ from oneself. Equity pedagogy is about equalizing opportunities to learn. It involves incorporating various strategies and techniques that attend to learning styles and intelligence types. Multicultural education proponents contend that in order to provide high quality experiences for all students, many traditional aspects of schools will need to be reconfigured. This is referred to as empowering school culture and social structures. The digest explains how technology can be used to support each of these five dimensions. (Contains 20 references.) (SM)
Preparing classroom teachers for delivering health instruction by Liane Summerfield( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest examines the preparation of classroom teachers in health, noting what teachers should know to effectively provide school health education. Most states and school districts require some health education. Health is generally taught by regular classroom teachers in elementary school, by classroom teachers with some health certification in middle school, and by teachers with health credentials in high school. Few states require coursework in health for prospective elementary teachers, while one half of the states require it for middle school teachers. Lack of teacher preparation is a major obstacle to implementing high quality school health education. Several factors hinder teacher preparation in health, including lack of time in the preservice curriculum and emphasis on standardized testing. Standards for teacher preparation in health education include: provide elementary teachers with strategies for infusing health instruction into the curriculum and for laying the groundwork for intensive middle school health education, and include content and process courses in health education within all teacher preparation programs. Competencies in health education recommended for elementary, middle, and special education teachers include the ability to incorporate health concepts into other curricular areas and to select and use valid and reliable sources of health information. (Contains 12 references.) (SM)
Teachers as leaders in education reform by Joan Wynne( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest defines the concept of teacher leadership and examines the impact of teacher leadership on student achievement and equity within the schools. Most researchers agree that teacher leaders demonstrate expertise in their instruction and share that knowledge with colleagues; are consistently on a professional learning curve; practice reflection; engage in continuous action research; collaborate with peers, parents, and communities; become socially aware and politically involved; mentor new teachers; become more involved in preparing pre-service teachers; and are risk-takers who participate in school decisions. The ultimate measure of teacher leaders' contributions is the impact on student academic achievement. While some studies demonstrate no evidence supporting a relationship between teacher leadership and student achievement, others suggest that the bureaucracy of schools and systems, as well as the attitudes of educational policymakers, stifles the possibilities for teacher leaders to be effective as change agents. Some research suggests that unless issues of power, race, and class are addressed in school communities, the achievement levels of minority students will not be affected by teacher empowerment, noting that teacher leaders must learn to challenge the intellectual structures, definitions, and assumptions about people of color in Eurocentric institutions. (Contains 28 references.) (SM)
Teacher mentoring as professional development by Leslie Huling-Austin( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teacher mentoring programs have increased dramatically since the early 1980s as a vehicle to support and retain novice teachers. However, researchers and facilitators of mentoring programs are recognizing that mentors also derive substantial benefits from the mentoring experience. This digest examines research on how mentoring contributes to the ongoing professional development of experienced teachers. Benefits to mentors include improved professional competency, increased reflective practice, teacher renewal, enhanced self-esteem, improved teacher collaboration, and development of teacher leadership. Working with new teachers can also lead mentors to participate in university research projects or teacher research. The benefits of mentoring programs have important implications for funding decisions made by administrators and staff development personnel. Principals must understand that creating a structure that allows experienced teachers to work with novice teachers will ultimately benefit the students, and the overall organization will be stronger as a result of the increased capacity of teachers serving as mentors. Staff developers should embrace mentoring programs not only as a valuable resource for beginning teachers, but also as a growth-promoting experience for mentors. (Contains 23 references.) (SM)
Title II requirements for schools, colleges, and departments of education by Penelope M Earley( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

During a review of the Higher Education Act (HEA), concern about the quality of teacher education emerged. As a result, Congress created a new teacher quality section in HEA known as Title II, which established grant programs for partnerships between K-12 schools and institutions of higher education and for states to improve teacher quality. It also established new accountability requirements for states and teacher preparation institutions. Congress mandated through Title II that any institutions preparing teachers that received funds through HEA, and any states that received HEA monies, submit annual reports on their efforts to improve teaching quality. These provisions gather information on, and rank within states, teacher preparation institutions. Strong sanctions are associated with Title II for institutions that do not submit reports or provide inaccurate information. States must compile all data submitted by colleges and universities and present information on licensure and certification. A consultative committee of individuals from states, higher education institutions, and the policy community was appointed to help the National Center for Education Statistics construct a reporting system. Reporting guidelines for use by institutions and states covered under HEA Title II were published in 2000. (SM)
National Board for Professional Teaching Standard's national teacher certification by Ann E Harman( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) was founded in 1987 in response to recommendations regarding the central role of teachers in educational quality. NBPTS establishes rigorous standards for what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do; operates a national voluntary system to assess and certify teachers meeting these standards; and advances related education reforms to improve learning. The NBPTS advanced teacher certification system is voluntary (intended to demonstrate experienced teachers' advanced levels of teaching skills and abilities). Teachers are measured against a set of standards established by experienced teachers, teacher educators, and subject-matter experts. NBPTS work is founded on five core propositions (e.g., teachers are committed to students and learning and teachers are members of learning communities). Using these propositions, NBPTS developed content standards for each certification field. Currently, NBPTS has standards available in 26 fields. With each standards document as a foundation, NBPTS works closely with experienced teachers and assessment development experts to develop the performance based assessment that will be the basis for awarding NBPTS certification. This digest examines the development of assessments from 1991 to 2001. Through two recent studies, the positive impact of NBPTS certification on teachers is being documented. (SM)
Preparing teachers to work with parents by Diana B Hiatt-Michael( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Though the benefits of working with families are documented, teacher education programs and school districts offer limited educational opportunities to new teachers. Until recently, most state certification departments did not require courses on family involvement in preservice education. During the late 1990s, the number of states requiring that teachers possess knowledge and skills related to parent and community involvement increased significantly. A recent survey of 96 teacher education programs found that 22 offered courses on parent involvement (developed for special education or early childhood teachers), though they were not required. Most programs interwove parent involvement issues into existing courses. Other studies show that early childhood and special education receive disproportionate amounts of parent involvement attention within university preparation and in school practice. Teachers consider working with parents important to children's positive school outcomes. If teachers do not receive such training during preservice education, opportunities to acquire it within the schools are limited. Three national hubs are the most promising sources for information, training, and support to new teachers, connecting schools, districts, and states into networks of sharing, development, and assessment. Legislation is needed that supports teacher education in meeting necessary requirements to work effectively with families across all 50 states. (SM)
Team sports, gymnastics, and dance in community settings : a guide for teachers, coaches, and parents by Patricia A Sullivan( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 188 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book is designed to enhance understanding of what is important for parents, coaches, and teachers to know when making choices about non-school-based programs for children. The book begins with "Preface" (Patricia A. Sullivan" and "Introduction" (Liane M. Summerfield.) The first section, "Team Sports" (Danny R. Mielke), which applies to a variety of popular youth sports, discusses what developmentally appropriate means and presents instructional methods for sports programs, noting the content that youth sport programs for children of varying ages should include and focusing on safety. The second section, "Gymnastics," (Susan M. Tendy and Carmine Giglio), describes what progression in gymnastics looks like from 18 months to 18 years. It offers benchmarks to help parents determine whether a program is right for their child. The third section, "Dance," (Gayle Kassing), explores the various settings for dance instruction and what to expect in each type of dance program. It outlines the types of dance offered in each setting and provides tips to help parents select the right type of dance program and dance teacher. An appendix offers a chart of the progression of physical activity skills for team sports, gymnastics, and dance. (Chapters contain references.) (Sm)
 
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Team sports, gymnastics, and dance in community settings : a guide for teachers, coaches, and parents
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controlled identityERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education

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English (40)