WorldCat Identities

Djankov, Simeon

Overview
Works: 170 works in 838 publications in 1 language and 10,687 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Thesis advisor, Honoree
Classifications: HD3611, 343.07
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Simeon Djankov
Doing business in 2004 : understanding regulation( Book )

5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 355 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Doing Business in 2004 provides both qualitative and quantitative information on the business climate in over 130 countries. Doing Business constructs a new set of indicators on the regulatory environment for private sector development and provides a collection of informative case studies of real-life experiences. Doing Business in 2004 covers the fundamental aspects of a business life cycle, from starting a business to bankruptcy. Topics include access to credit, bankruptcy, entry regulations, contract enforcement, and labor regulations."
Resolution of financial distress : an international perspective on the design of bankruptcy laws by Stijn Claessens( Book )

22 editions published between 2001 and 2013 in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The institutions of bankruptcy have been at the center of the great economic events of the last decade, ranging from the Asian economic crisis, to the transition from socialism to capitalism. Our understanding of the economic, and legal structure of these institutions, as well as of their impact on economic development, has advanced considerably during this period as well. This study provides valuable information on the advances for resolution of financial distress, through theoretical studies, historical data, and evidence from recent worldwide experiences. It illustrates the possibilities, and methods of beneficial legal reform of bankruptcy procedures, as well as the pitfalls of misguided political action. The study is a timely, and valuable resource for economists, lawyers, and all others interested in institutional reform in emerging financial markets
Doing business 2007 : how to reform : comparing regulation in 175 economies by World Bank (Afghanistan)( Book )

7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Doing Business 2007: How to Reform is the fourth in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 175 economies - from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe - and over time." "Regulations affecting 10 areas of everyday business are measured: starting a business, dealing with licenses, employing workers, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and closing a business. The indicators are used to analyze economic outcomes and identify what reforms have worked, where and why."--Jacket
Doing business in 2006 : creating jobs by World Bank( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 180 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Doing Business in 2006: Creating Jobs is the third in a series of annual reports investigating the scope and manner of regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. New quantitative indicators on business regulations and their enforcement can be compared across more than 150 countries, and over time. The indicators are used to analyze economic outcomes and identify what reforms have worked, where, and why. Book jacket
The regulation of entry by Rafael La Porta( Book )

35 editions published between 1999 and 2008 in English and held by 158 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New data show that countries that regulate the entry of new firms more heavily have greater corruption and larger unofficial economies, but not better quality goods. The evidence supports the view that regulating entry benefits politicians and bureacrats
East Asia corporations : heroes or villains by Stijn Claessens( Book )

14 editions published between 1994 and 2000 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation World Bank Discussion Paper no. 409. East Asian corporations differ from their counterparts in other countries in important ways. Before the recent financial crisis these differences were viewed as one of the reasons for the success of East Asian economies. The crisis altered that view, and many scholars now argue that the weak corporate governance and financing structures of East Asian corporations are partly to blame for the recent crisis. This paper reviews several features of East Asian corporations, showing that they have high leverage and concentrated ownership, are typically affiliated with business groups, and operate in multiple industries. These characteristics affected the performance of corporations prior to the crisis as well as their ability to deal with its aftermath. Each economy's level of development also affected how these characteristics interacted with firm performance and valuation. Finally, the concentration of ownership in the hands of a few large families may have influenced economies' institutional development
Inside the euro crisis : an eyewitness account by Simeon Djankov( Book )

10 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and Undetermined and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In mid-2009 Simeon Djankov, who had dealt with a variety of economic and financial crises as chief economist for finance and private sector development at the World Bank, was suddenly thrust into the job of finance minister of his native Bulgaria. For nearly four years in that post, he attended more than 40 meetings of European finance ministers and had a front row seat at the intense discussions and struggles to overcome the economic and financial crisis that threatened to unravel the historic undertaking of an economically integrated Europe. In this personal account, Djankov details his odyssey on the front lines, observing Europe's fitful efforts to contain crises in Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, and France. He tells the inside story of how the European Central Bank assumed responsibility for the crisis, pledging to do "whatever it takes" to save the euro area. This candid book recounts the disagreements over fiscal austerity, monetary policy, and banking supervision, while focusing on the personalities who promoted progress-and those who opposed it. He also tells the dramatic story of the events that led to his own resignation as finance minister in 2013 over the policies he was pursuing to spare Bulgaria from getting sucked into the crisis
Restructuring large industrial firms in Central and Eastern Europe : an empirical analysis by Gerhard Pohl( Book )

17 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 129 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The determinants of enterprise restructuring in transition : an assessment of the evidence by Simeon Djankov( Book )

19 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Who owns the media? by Andrei Shleifer( Book )

26 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We examine the patterns of media ownership in 97 countries around the world. We find that almost universally the largest media firms are owned by the government or by private families. Government ownership is more pervasive in broadcasting than in the printed media. Government ownership of the media is generally associated with less press freedom, fewer political and economic rights, and, most conspicuously, inferior social outcomes in the areas of education and health. It does not appear that adverse consequences of government ownership of the media are restricted solely to the instances of government monopoly
The new comparative economics by Andrei Shleifer( Book )

29 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In recent years, comparative economics experienced a revival, with a new focus on comparing capitalist economies. The theme of the new research is that institutions exert a profound influence on economic development. We argue that, to understand capitalist institutions, one needs to understand the basic tradeoff between the costs of disorder and those of dictatorship. We then apply this logic to study the structure of efficient institutions, the consequences of colonial transplantation, and the politics of institutional choice
Europe's growth challenge by Anders Åslund( Book )

8 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A cogent and systematic look at the ways in which enacting fiscal and governmental policy changes might reinvigorate Europe's stagnant economy
Determinants of intra-industry trade between East and West Europe by Chonira Aturupane( )

19 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

November 1997 There is a good deal of intra-industry trade between nations in Central and Eastern Europe and the European Union. Most of it is vertical (the exchange of similar goods of different quality). Eastern European nations and the European Union (EU) is among the highest of all the EU's bilateral trade flows. Aturupane, Djankov, and Hoekman break down data on these trade flows into horizontal and vertical components and investigate the determinants of each. They find that vertical intra-industry trade (the exchange of similar goods of different quality) accounts for 80 to 90 percent of total intra-industry trade. It is positively associated with product differentiation, labor intensity of production, economies of scale, and foreign direct investment. Controlling for country effects, they find a statistically significant positive association between horizontal intra-industry trade (the exchange of close substitutes of similar quality) and foreign direct investment, product differentiation, and industry concentration. They find a significant negative relationship for economies of scale and labor intensity. These results do not hold if they do not control for country effects, suggesting that country-specific factors are key determinants of horizontal intra-industry trade. This paper-a product of the Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to analyze the role of trade and foreign investment in the process of transition in Eastern Europe
The great rebirth : lessons from the victory of capitalism over communism by Simeon Djankov( Book )

9 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The fall of communism 25 years ago transformed the political and economic landscape in more than two dozen countries across Europe and Asia. In this volume, political leaders, scholars and policymakers assess the lessons learned from the 'great rebirth' of capitalism, highlighting the policies that were most successful in helping countries make the transition to stable and prosperous market economies, as well as those cases of countries reverting to political and economic authoritarianism. The authors of these essays conclude that best outcomes resulted from visionary leadership, a willingness to take bold steps, privatization of state-owned enterprises and deregulation. Recent backsliding in Russia and Hungary has cast a shadow over the legacy of the transition a quarter century ago, however. This volume grew out of a ... symposium ... held in Budapest, Hungary in May, 2014"--Publisher's description
Courts : the Lex Mundi project by Simeon Djankov( Book )

24 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In cooperation with Lex Mundi member law firms in 109 countries, we measure and describe the exact procedures used by litigants and courts to evict a tenant for non-payment of rent and to collect a bounced check. We use these data to construct an index of procedural formalism of dispute resolution for each country. We find that such formalism is systematically greater in civil than in common law countries. Moreover, procedural formalism is associated with higher expected duration of judicial proceedings, more corruption, less consistency, less honesty, less fairness in judicial decisions, and inferior access to justice. These results suggest that legal transplantation may have led to an inefficiently high level of procedural formalism, particularly in developing countries
Who controls East Asian corporations? by Stijn Claessens( )

10 editions published in 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

February 1999 A study of 2,980 corporations in nine East Asian countries finds more than half of those firms being controlled by a single shareholder. Many smaller and older firms are family-controlled. Wealth is very concentrated in some countries, and links between business and government are extensive, so the legal system has probably been influenced by the prevailing ownership structure. Claessens, Djankov, and Lang identify the ultimate ownership structure for 2,980 corporations in nine East Asian countries. They find that: * More than half of those firms are controlled by a single shareholder. * Smaller firms and older firms are more likely to be family-controlled. * Patterns of controlling ownership stakes differ across countries. The concentration of control generally diminishes with higher economic and institutional development. * In many countries, control is enhanced through pyramid structures and deviations from one-share-one-vote rules. As a result, voting rights exceed formal cash-flow rights. * Management is rarely separated from ownership control, and management in two thirds of the firms that are not widely held is related to management of the controlling shareholder. * In some countries, wealth is very concentrated and links between government and business are extensive, so the legal system has probably been influenced by the prevailing ownership structure. This paper-a product of the Financial Economics Unit, Financial Sector Practice Department-is part of a larger effort in the department to uncover the causes of the East Asian crisis
Ownership structure and enterprise restructuring in six newly independent states by Simeon Djankov( Book )

9 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

February 1999 Enterprises in six newly independent states exhibit large differences in ownership structure, differences that seem to be determined by the method of privatization pursued. Enterprises in countries where the privatization programs favored incumbent managers ended up with heavy ownership by managers; countries that favored mass privatization had the highest proportion of ownership shares held by outside investors. Ownership by outside local investors or the state is not significantly correlated with enterprise restructuring; high foreign ownership is. Djankov investigates the relationship between ownership structure and enterprise restructuring in six newly independent states: Georgia, Kazakstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine. He documents the changing pattern of ownership in 960 privatized manufacturing companies from 1995-97. There are large differences in ownership structure across countries, differences that seem to be determined by the method of privatization pursued. Enterprises in countries where the privatization programs favored incumbent managers (Georgia and Ukraine) ended with heavy ownership by managers (an average 53.6 percent and 46.2 percent, respectively). Countries that used mainly the mass privatization approach (Kazakstan and the Kyrgyz Republic) had the highest proportion of ownership shares held by outside investors (37 percent and 21.2 percent, respectively). Foreign ownership is positively associated with enterprise restructuring at high ownership levels (above 30 percent of shares). By contrast, the relationship between management ownership and enterprise restructuring is non-monotonic, positive at low (below 10 percent) or high (above 30 percent) levels. Finally, Djankov shows that ownership by outside local investors or the state is not significantly correlated with restructuring. This paper-a product of the Financial Economics Unit, Financial Sector PracticeDepartment - is part of a larger effort in the department to study the transition process
Thailand's corporate financing and governance structures by Pedro Alba( )

12 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

November 1998 Weaknesses in corporate governance and the fragile financial structure of many corporations contributed to, and deepened Thailand's recent financial crisis. Large corporations need to reduce their vulnerability to economic shocks and improve corporate governance; smaller firms should achieve a more stable funding structure. Alba, Claessens, and Djankov assess Thailand's policy options for reducing large corporations' vulnerability to economic shocks and improving their corporate governance - and for providing smaller firms a more stable funding structure. Using data for firms listed on Thailand's stock exchange, they empirically assess the relative importance of various factors determining the cost of capital, the availability of financing, and policies and distortions that affect corporate governance in nonfinancial firms. The empirical findings highlight weaknesses in corporate governance and the inherent risks in Thailand's corporate financing structures. They conclude that the most important ask in improving the structure of corporate financing and the framework for corporate governance is to change incentives. This will involve: * Accelerating legal reform, including reform of bankruptcy and foreclosure laws. * Improving bank monitoring of enterprise management and encouraging banks to develop more arm's-length relationships with firms. This will require greater transparency and disclosure of ownership relationships and stricter enforcement of insider and related lending limits, violation of which contributed poor intermediation and the recent crisis. * Improving disclosure and accounting practices. Self-regulatory agencies may need to play more of a role, possibly with more legal power to discipline violators. * Better enforcement of corporate governance rules. The formal structure for corporate governance is standard but enforcement is weak. * Facilitation of equity infusions. Investors - especially minority shareholders - may need to play a more direct role in monitoring and disciplining managers. To attract new infusions of equity, new equity owners may need more-than-proportional representation on the board of directors until other investor protection mechanisms are strengthened. * Improving the framework for corporate governance. A broad public discussion of corporate governance, similar to recent discussions in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, may be needed to clarify the distribution of control in the economy's real sector. * Strengthening institutions responsible for gathering and analyzing data on firms of all sizes and for monitoring firm performance and behavior. This paper-a product of the Economic Policy Unit, Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Network-is part of a larger effort in the network to study the performance and financing structures of East Asian corporations
Disintegration and trade flows Evidence from the Former Soviet Union by Simeon Djankov( )

17 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

June 2000 - This study of trade flows among and between nine Russian regions and 14 republics of the former Soviet Union shows a bias toward domestic trade in the reform period that is primarily the result of tariffs. In addition, old linkages - such as infrastructure, business networks, and production and consumption chains - have limited the reorientation of trade. Djankov and Freund study the effects of trade barriers and the persistence of past linkages on trade flows in the former Soviet Union. Estimating a gravity equation on trade among and between nine Russian regions and 14 former Soviet republics, they find that Russian regions traded 60 percent more with each other than with republics in the reform period (1994-96). By contrast, the Russian regions did not trade significantly more with each other than with republics in the prereform period (1987-90). The results suggest that the bias toward domestic trade in the reform period is primarily the result of tariffs. In addition, past linkages - such as infrastructure, business networks, and production and consumption chains - have limited the reorientation of trade. This paper-a product of the Financial Sector Strategy and Policy Department-is part of a larger effort in the department to promote economic liberalization
Trading on time by Simeon Djankov( )

10 editions published between 2006 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The authors determine how time delays affect international trade using newly collected World Bank data on the days it takes to move standard cargo from the factory gate to the ship in 126 countries. They estimate a modified gravity equation, controlling for endogeneity and remoteness. On average, each additional day that a product is delayed prior to being shipped reduces trade by at least 1 percent. Put differently, each day is equivalent to a country distancing itself from its trade partners by 70 kilometers on average. Delays have an even greater impact on developing country exports and exports of time-sensitive goods, such as perishable agricultural products. In particular, a day's delay reduces a country's relative exports of time-sensitive to time-insensitive agricultural goods by 6 percent. "--World Bank web site
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.43 (from 0.08 for Inside the ... to 0.79 for Determinan ...)

Doing business in 2004 : understanding regulation
Alternative Names
D'ânkov, Semen.

Dânkov, Simeon Denčev.

Dʹi︠a︡nkov, Semen

Dʹi︠a︡nkov, Semen 1970-

Díankov, Simeon

Diankow, Simeon.

Djankov, Simeon.

Djankov, Simeon Denčev 1970-

Siméon Djankov

Simeon Djankov Bulgarian politician and economist

Simeon Djankov bulgarsk økonom

Simeon Djankov econoom uit Bulgarije

Simeon Djankow bulgarischer Weltbank-Ökonom

Дянков, Симеон

Дянков, Симеон Денчев

Симеон Ѓанков

Симеон Дянков болгарський економіст і колишній державний діяч, ректор Російської економічної школи

Languages
English (296)

Covers
Resolution of financial distress : an international perspective on the design of bankruptcy lawsDoing business 2007 : how to reform : comparing regulation in 175 economiesDoing business in 2006 : creating jobsThe determinants of enterprise restructuring in transition : an assessment of the evidence