WorldCat Identities

Martin, John P.

Overview
Works: 138 works in 319 publications in 1 language and 1,680 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Other, Contributor, Editor, Creator, Author of introduction, Redactor
Classifications: HV9650.R4, 364.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about John P Martin
 
Most widely held works by John P Martin
Trade and payments adjustment under flexible exchange rates : papers of the second annual conference of the International Economics Study Group by International Economics Study Group( Book )

21 editions published between 1977 and 1979 in English and Undetermined and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What works among active labour market policies : evidence from OECD countries' experiences by John P Martin( Book )

17 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 162 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper seeks to answer the following question: what is the potential contribution which active labour market policies can make a part of a strategy to combat high and persistent unemployment and the problems of low pay and poverty among the working-age population? In order to answer this question, it is vital to know what works among active policies and in what circumstances. The OECD Secretariat has been working intensively on these questions in recent years and the paper summarises the main results of our work to date. The structure of the paper is as follows. Section 2 provides some factual background on public spending on labour market policies in OECD countries over the past decade, drawing on an internationally comparable data set which the OECD has developed to monitor trends in this field of public spending. Then I summarise the main results of on-going OECD research into the effectiveness of active labour market policies. My review mainly exploits two sources: (i) the
Potential output in the seven major OECD countries by Raymond Torres( Book )

12 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper outlines the concepts and methods used by the OECD Secretariat to derive estimates of potential output and capacity utilisation for the major seven countries. While there are many alternative definitions of potential output, the one which is currently being used by the OECD Secretariat refers to the level of output that is consistent over the medium-term with stable inflation. The paper also contrasts the OECD approach and estimates with those published recently by the IMF. Finally, it presents the results of some INTERLINK simulations designed to illustrate some of the possible effects of faster productivity and potential output growth on macroeconomic performance
GREEN -- a multi-sector, multi-region general equilibrium model for quantifying the costs of curbing CO₂ emissions: a technical manual by Jean-Marc Burniaux( Book )

9 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 141 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The OECD Secretariat has developed a multi-region, multi-sector, dynamic applied general equilibrium (AGE) model to quantify the economy-wide and global costs of policies to curb emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). The project is called the GeneRal Equilibrium ENvironment model, hereafter referred to as GREEN. The purpose of this paper is to provide a full technical description of the GREEN model, its data base and parametrisation as of April 1992. It replaces the previous version of the GREEN Technical Manual which was issued in June 1991 as Working Paper No. 104
Exchange rates and portfolio balance by John P Martin( )

8 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An open economy portfolio balance model, describing allocation among money, a domestic bond, and a traded foreign currency bond is developed for a world of many countries. A special role is attributed to the dollar, namely that all internationally traded bonds are denominated in that currency. It is shown that in the short run with real variables exogenous and expectations static, stability requires that all countries except the U.S. be net creditors in dollar-denominated bonds. What data are available on inter-country claims suggest that some countries may well be net debtors abroad in foreign currency. In particular, if one excludes direct investment claims, private claims on the rest of the world by Japan and Canada have been negative over the period of floating rates since 1973. However, some preliminary reduced-form regression equations for the dollar exchange rates of these two countries do not support the implications of the portfolio balance model in the debtor case. On the other hand, an equation for a composite of Western European currencies (by our calculations, this group of countries is a net creditor) gives more promising results
The costs of reducing CO₂ emissions : evidence from GREEN by Jean-Marc Burniaux( Book )

5 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

And conclusions -- Busines-as-usual (BaU) path of CO2 emissions -- Agreements by OECD countries to curb CO2 emissions -- International agreements including the non-OECD regions -- Eliminating distortions in energy prices
The triumph of truth : history and visions of Clio by John P Martin( )

9 editions published between 1791 and 2012 in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reforming Retirement-Income Systems : Lessons from the Recent Experiences of OECD Countries by John P Martin( )

9 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1. Reforming pensions looms large over the policy agenda of OECD countries. This is hardly surprising since public spending on pensions accounted on average for 7 per cent of OECD GDP in 2005; and this pension spending effort is set to increase significantly over the coming decades in response to population ageing. Pension policy is indeed challenging and controversial because it involves long-term decisions in the face of numerous short-term political pressures. 2. However, the status quo does not always win out so far as pension reform in concerned: public finance crises and the looming threat of ageing populations have proved effective spurs for reform. As a result, much has been done since the early 1990s to make pension systems fit for the future. Nearly all the 30 OECD countries have made at least some changes to their pension systems in that period. In 16 of them, there have been major reforms that will significantly affect future benefits. 3. The purpose of this paper is to summarise these reforms and highlight the main lessons. Section 1 looks at which countries reformed their pensions systems and which did not. It also examines the fiscal challenges posed by public pensions. Section 2 describes the measures in the reforms themselves. These include, among other things, increases in pension age, changes in the way benefits are calculated and smaller pension increases in retirement than in the past. Section 3 explores the impact of these reforms on future pension entitlements of today's retirees, showing a clear trend to a lower pension promise for today's workers than for past generations. This means that people will need to save more for their own retirement via private pension schemes, an issue examined in Section 4. This is followed in Section 5 by a review of the main outstanding challenges facing pension systems in OECD countries. The final section presents some concluding remarks
The Public sector : issues for the 1990s by Howard Oxley( )

7 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the early 1980s, most OECD countries have embarked on medium-term strategies to restore greater balance to the public finances and to wind back government intervention in the economy. The attached paper examines the progress so far. It also reviews and evaluates some of the changes to public sector management practices which were implemented in the 1980s and assesses some of the pressures on the public sector which are likely to arise in the 1990s. Most OECD governments appear to have made significant headway in budgetary consolidation, particularly in the second half of the last decade, and public expenditure as a share of GDP has stabilised for the area as a whole, once allowance is made for cyclical effects. There has also been some measure of success in reducing economic regulation in a number of sectors. Nonetheless, governments are likely to face increased spending pressures in the 1990s, partly reflecting catch-up following expenditure restraint in the 1980s. Improving
The Costs of policies to reduce global emissions of CO₂ : initial simulation results with GREEN by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development( )

8 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The OECD Secretariat has developed a multi-region, multi-sector. dynamic general equilibrium model to quantify the economy-wide and global costs of policies to curb emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). The project is called the GeneRal Equilibrium ENvironmental model, hereafter referred to as GREEN. The purpose of this paper is to outline the main features of GREEN in a non-technical fashion and to present some preliminary results from three scenarios of alternative international agreements to cut CO2 emissions. The paper also sets out a range of options for possible extensions to the model, with the explicit aim of improving its policy relevance
The costs of reducing CO₂ emissions: a comparison of carbon tax curves with GREEN by Joaquim Oliveira-Martins( )

4 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper forms part of an OECD project which addresses the issue of the costs of reducing CO2 emissions by comparing the results from six global models of a set of standardised scenarios. This paper provides evidence of regional differences with respect to carbon tax curves through the middle of the next century. It also develops some analytical tools that can help to explain the main mechanisms at work in GREEN. Finally, it evaluates the welfare and output costs entailed in reduction emissions
Quantifying the economy-wide effects of agricultural policies : a general equilibrium approach by Jean-Marc Burniaux( )

6 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents a progress report on the Economics and Statistics Department's applied general equilibrium model -- the WALRAS model. This model has been developed with the explicit objective of quantifying the economy-wide effects of agricultural policies in OECD countries. The common specification of the model for the major OECD agricultural trading countries/regions (Australia, Canada, EEC, Japan, New Zealand and the United States) is described in detail. Results are presented for some preliminary simulations of the effects of removing the 1979-81 levels of agricultural assistance in these countries/regions. The initial results relate only to unilateral liberalisation experiments with the unlinked country/region models, with no account being taken of feedback effects through changes in world agricultural prices and trade volumes
Should we extend the role of private social expenditure? by Mark Pearson( )

7 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some people make great claims about the advantages to be gained from greater reliance on the private sector for the provision of social protection. Many of the claims for great macroeconomic advantages do not stand up to scrutiny. However, there is some reason to hope that private provision might promote microeconomic efficiency and services which are more responsive to consumer preferences than those provided by a single monopoly public sector provider. Drawing on examples from recent OECD country experiences with private health insurance, care for children and the elderly, and private pension provision, three main conclusions can be drawn. First, opening provision to a diversity of providers has often promoted more choice and innovation. Second, however, efficiency gains have often been limited. This is due to a number of inter-related reasons: (a) Individualisation of packages of services is expensive. (b) In order to ensure adequate coverage of the population, cross-subsidisation of particular groups of people is often mandated on providers, reducing cost-competition and diversity of choice. (c) Informational asymmetries (how good is this childcare which I cannot personally monitor, or this health care package which I am not technically able to assess?) cannot be overcome without extensive regulation, which has the effect of limiting innovation and competition. (d) The fiscal incentives necessary to stimulate private provision are high, and have welfare costs of their own. Third, and related to this last point, the distributional effects of private provision raise significant social problems. Private financing and provision of social benefits is not a magic wand; waving it in the social protection field will not mean that the economy and voters will be freed from some great deadweight that has been dragging them down. Nevertheless, the private sector can sometimes deliver either a slightly cheaper, slightly more varied or slightly more flexible system of social protection
Irish manufactured imports from the U.K. in the sixties : the effects of AIFTA by Dermot McAleese( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

WALRAS, a multi-sector, multi-country applied general equilibrium model for quantifying the economy-wide effects of agricultural policies : a technical manual by Jean-Marc Burniaux( )

7 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents a technical description of the OECD's multi-sector, multi-country applied general equilibrium model -- the WALRAS model. This model has been developed with the explicit objective of quantifying the economy-wide effects of agricultural policies in OECD countries. The common specification of the model for the major OECD agricultural trading countries/regions (Australia, Canada, EEC, Japan, New Zealand and the United States) is presented in detail. The construction of the benchmark data sets and the calibration of the model are also fully described
The Irish times : past and present : a record of the journal since 1859 by John P Martin( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The changing nature of the school-to-work transition process in OECD countries by Glenda Quintini( )

5 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Despite the fact that today's young cohorts are smaller in number and better educated than their older counterparts, high youth unemployment remains a serious problem in many OECD countries. This reflects a variety of factors, including the relatively high proportion of young people leaving school without a basic education qualification, the fact that skills acquired in initial education are not always well adapted to labour market requirements, as well as general labour market conditions and problems in the functioning of labour markets. The paper highlights the contrasting trends in youth labour market performance over the past decade using a wide range of indicators. It also presents new evidence on i) the length of transitions from school to work; and ii) the degree to which temporary jobs serve as either traps for young people or stepping-stones to good careers. In addition, the paper reviews some recent policy innovations to improve youth employment prospects"--Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit web site
How to reduce taxes by dividing income among the family by Arnold R Cutler( Book )

4 editions published between 1975 and 1982 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edition of 1955 by G.B. Lourie and A.R. Cutler
The social consequences of conviction by J. P Martin( Book )

3 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women on the move: the neglected gender dimension of the brain drain by Jean-Christophe Dumont( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two trends in international migration flows have attracted much attention recently: (1) the growing feminisation of migration flows; and (2) the increasing selectivity of migration towards the highly skilled, which in turn has given rise to renewed concern about the "brain drain" consequences for the sending countries. The two issues have not been considered jointly, however, mainly due to the lack of relevant data. This paper addresses this shortcoming by looking at the gender dimension of the brain drain, based on a new comparable data set that has been collected by the OECD and which allows us to identify people by country of residence, place of birth, gender, and level of education. The evidence summarized in this paper shows that female migration to OECD countries has been increasing significantly in recent decades, so that migrant stocks are now more or less gender-balanced. A more surprising result is that this is also true for the highly skilled. Taking into account the fact that women still face an unequal access to tertiary education in many less developed countries, it appears that women are over-represented in the brain drain. This result is reinforced by econometric estimates showing that emigration of highly skilled women is higher, the poorer is their country of origin. This effect is also observed for men but to a lesser extent. It is not observed, however, at lower educational levels, where the traditional migration hump is identifiable. Econometric estimates also report a negative impact of emigration of highly skilled women on three key education and health indicators: infant mortality, under-5 mortality, and secondary school enrollment rate by gender. These results raise concerns about a potentially significant negative impact of the female brain drain on the poorest countries
 
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Alternative Names
Martin, John

Martin, John, 1948-

Martin, John Paul

Languages
English (149)