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MacDougall, David

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Most widely held works about David MacDougall
 
Most widely held works by David MacDougall
The corporeal image : film, ethnography, and the senses by David MacDougall( )

21 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 1,665 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this book, David MacDougall, one of the leading ethnographic filmmakers and film scholars of his generation, builds upon the ideas from his widely praised Transcultural Cinema and argues for a new conception of how visual images create human knowledge in a world in which the value of seeing has often been eclipsed by words. In ten chapters, MacDougall explores the relations between photographic images and the human body-the body of the viewer and the body behind the camera as well as the body as seen in ethnography, cinema, and photography. In a landmark piece, he discusses the need for a new field of social aesthetics, further elaborated in his reflections on filming at an elite boys' school in northern India. The theme of the school is taken up as well in his discussion of fiction and nonfiction films of childhood. The book's final section presents a radical view of the history of visual anthropology as a maverick anthropological practice that was always at odds with the anthropology of words. In place of the conventional wisdom, he proposes a new set of principles for visual anthropology. These are essays in the classical sense--speculative, judicious, lucidly written, and mercifully jargon-free. The Corporeal Image presents the latest ideas from one of our foremost thinkers on the role of vision and visual representation in contemporary social thought." http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0654/2004060754-d.html
Transcultural cinema by David MacDougall( Book )

24 editions published between 1998 and 2021 in 3 languages and held by 1,036 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Sherpas are portrayed by Westerners as heroic mountain guides, or "tigers of the snow," as Buddhist adepts, and as a people in touch with intimate ways of life that seem no longer available in the Western world. In this book, Vincanne Adams explores how attempts to characterize an "authentic" Sherpa are complicated by Western fascination with Sherpas and by the Sherpas' desires to live up to Western portrayals of them. Noting that diplomatic aides at world summit meetings go by the name "Sherpa," as do a van in the U.K. built for rough terrain and a software product from Silicon Valley, Adams examines the "authenticating" effects of this mobile signifier on a community of Himalayan Sherpas who live at the base of Mount Everest, Nepal, and its "deauthenticating" effects on anthropological representation." "This book speaks not only to anthropologists concerned with ethnographic portrayals of Otherness but also to those working in cultural studies who are concerned with ethnographically grounded analyses of representations. Throughout Adams illustrates how one might undertake an ethnography of transnationally produced subjects by using the notion of "virtual" identities. In a manner informed by both Buddhism and shamanism, virtual Sherpas are always both real and distilled reflections of the desires that produce them. Book jacket."--Jacket
To live with herds by David MacDougall( Visual )

39 editions published between 1971 and 2016 in 3 languages and held by 338 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This classic, widely acclaimed film on the Jie of Uganda, produced by the renowned ethnographic filmmaking team of David and Judith MacDougall, examines the effects of nation building in pre-Amin Uganda on the seminomadic, pastoral Jie. Much more than an intrinsically interesting historical document, it has achieved classic status among ethnographic films owing to its remarkable success in developing a coherent analytical statement about its subjects' situation, yet at the same time allowing them to speak for themselves about the world as they see and experience it. The film explores life in a traditional Jie homestead during a harsh dry season. The talk and work of adults go on, but there is also hardship and worry, exacerbated by government policies that seem to attack rather than support the values and economic base of Jie society. A mother counts her children; among them is a son she hardly knows who has joined the educated bureaucracy. Later we find him supervising famine relief for his own people in a situation that seems far beyond his control. At the end of the film Logoth, the protector of the homestead, travels to the west to rejoin his herds in an area of relative plenty; at least for the time being his life seems free from official interference
Gandhi's children by David MacDougall( Visual )

14 editions published between 2005 and 2014 in Hindi and English and held by 323 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This unforgettable documentary feature film stands in stark contrast to renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall's previous films exploring institutions for children in India. In his Doon School Quintet, MacDougall examined India's most prestigious boys' boarding school. His next project, SchoolScapes, was about Rishi Valley School, a progressive co-educational boarding school in South India founded on the educational philosophy of the 20th-century Indian philosopher, Krishnamurti. Gandhi's Children chronicles the life of children in what the filmmaker calls "the exact opposite of Doon," a shelter for orphans and juvenile detainees run by an Indian non-governmental organization. The Prayas Children's Home for Boys is located on the northern fringe of New Delhi in Jahangirpuri, a resettlement colony whose residents were moved from inner-city slums several decades ago. It is still one of the poorest quarters of the city. The home was built in 1993, but its facilities are already deteriorating. There is broken plumbing, defective lighting, and other problems. The boys live in dormitories ranged around two central courtyards. The home provides food and shelter for 350 boys. Some are orphans, some have been abandoned, others have run away from home. About half were picked up from the streets for minor crimes and are held under a court order. Living in the institution for several months, MacDougall explores its routines and the varied experiences of individual boys, including one who had been abducted from his family, one who was a seasoned street-dweller, another who was a pickpocket, and another who had been separated from his family during a fire in his slum area. Despite the harshness of their lives, many of the boys show remarkable strength of character, knowledge, and resilience. Often left to their own devices, they institute a seemingly arbitrary set of checks and balances to make sense of the chaos around them. Then one day 181 new boys arrive, having been "rescued" in police raids from sordid child-labor factories. The new children place additional strains on Prayas's already deteriorating facilities. The institution does what it can, but is it enough?Gandhi's Children is filled with scenes of great nuance and sensitivity and its extraordinary succession of revelatory moments exemplifies why David MacDougall's work is unique among the world's greatest ethnographic filmmakers. Destined to become another MacDougall classic, Gandhi's Children will motivate thought, analysis, and discussion in a wide variety of courses in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, visual anthropology, education, and Third-World studies. It was produced by David MacDougall
Turkana conversations. notes on a Turkana marriage( Visual )

27 editions published between 1981 and 2013 in 3 languages and held by 315 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This, the third and final film in renowned ethnographic filmmakers David and Judith MacDougall's classic Turkana Conversations Trilogy, investigates the views of the Turkana, and especially Turkana women, on marriage and polygyny. As the plans for a marriage in a nearby homestead unfold, the film explores why a Turkana woman would want her husband to take a second (or third) wife, and how the system of polygyny can be a source of solidarity among women while at the same time it may brutally disregard individual feelings. The Turkana women are well aware of the contradictory problems associated with individual liberty and communal survival. The film admirably demonstrates how Turkana culture -- and, by extension, human culture -- is a living thing, shaped by the people who carry it. In Turkana, with English subtitles
SchoolScapes by David MacDougall( Visual )

14 editions published between 2007 and 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 303 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A film about the Rishi Valley School in Andhra Pradesh founded on the educational philosophy of Krishnamurti. It is a rigorous co-educational school which includes the act of observation as one of the ways to inspire and teach
Some alien creatures by David MacDougall( Visual )

10 editions published between 2005 and 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 294 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this carefully observed and richly nuanced film about a progressive co-educational boarding school in South India, young boys and girls jokingly accuse each other of being like 'alien creatures.'{uFFFD} In exploring this gender divide, renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall examines the lives of three boys at the school: Ashutosh, aged 10, Anjney, aged 12, and Deepak, aged 14. The engaging portraits that emerge reveal the thoughts and resourcefulness of the boys as well as their problems, dreams, and daily activities. The film provides keen insight into contemporary Indian childhood as well as gender relations. At the same time, it examines the everyday reality of one of India's most famous and influential schools, The Rishi Valley School in Andhra Pradesh, which is founded on the educational philosophy of Krishnamurti, one of India's most prominent 20th-century thinkers. Like MacDougall's earlier five-part series on India's Doon School, Some Alien Creatures is a compelling and insightful cultural portrait and an essential work of ethnographic cinema. It will generate reflection and discussion in a variety of courses in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, gender studies, education, visual anthropology, and psychology
Boran Women( Visual )

8 editions published between 1974 and 2014 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Traditionally confined to the roles of life-givers, nurturers and homemakers, Boran women of Kenya are slowly realizing the importance of education and the difference it can make in their lives. They attach great importance to the traditional role of women in a herding society and perform dawn to dusk tasks with little deviation from customary ways. Remarkable though is the obvious independence they demonstrate in performing tasks which normally would fall under the male domain, like building their own houses
Under the men's tree( Visual )

9 editions published between 1970 and 2004 in 3 languages and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At Jie cattle camps in Uganda men often gather under a special tree to make leather and wooden goods and talk, relax, and sleep. This brilliant ethnographic documentary by renowned filmmakers David and Judith MacDougall captures one particularly riveting discussion one afternoon under the men's tree. The conversation on this particular afternoon becomes a kind of reverse ethnography, centering on the European's most noticeable possession, the motor vehicle. This is a uniquely delicate and intimate film, filled with the humor of the Jie and, implicitly, the ironic wit of the filmmakers
The looking machine : essays on cinema, anthropology and documentary filmmaking by David MacDougall( Book )

6 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This new collection of essays presents the latest thoughts of one of the world's leading ethnographic filmmakers and writers on cinema. It will provide essential reading for students in cinema studies, filmmaking, and visual anthropology. The dozen wide-ranging essays give unique insights into the history of documentary, how films evoke space, time and physical sensations, and the intellectual and emotional links between filmmakers and their subjects. In an era of reality television, historical re-enactments, and designer packaging, MacDougall defends the principles that inspired the earliest practitioners of documentary cinema. He urges us to consider how the form can more accurately reflect the realities of our everyday lives. Building on his own practice in filmmaking, he argues that this means resisting the pressures for self-censorship and the inherent ethnocentrism of our own society and those we film
Nawi by David MacDougall( Visual )

9 editions published between 1969 and 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 224 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This classic ethnographic documentary, by the renowned filmmaking team of David and Judith MacDougall, explores the nomadic life of the Jie of Uganda. During the dry season the Jie leave their homesteads in large numbers and take their cattle to temporary camps (nawi) in western Karamoja District, where water and grass are more abundant. The film shows the preparations for the 60-mile trip and scenes from the slow journey, including the herding and care of the cattle, bathing at the waterhole, resting under trees, and spending the evening within a thornbush kraal. Includes a number of Jie herdsboys' songs
Under the palace wall by David MacDougall( Visual )

8 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in 3 languages and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Indiqué sur la jaquette : From the 16th century the Indian village of Delwara in southern Rajasthan was ruled as a principality of the kingdom of Mewar. Its palace, which overlooks the village, is now a luxury hotel - a world remote from the daily life of the villagers. Following on from his film SchoolScapes, which was inspired by the early cinema of Lumière, David MacDougall here employs a series of precisely observed scenes to explore Delwara's local primary school as a part of contemporary village life - a life that continues "under the palace wall"
Arnav at six by David MacDougall( Visual )

6 editions published between 2012 and 2015 in 3 languages and held by 210 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Filmed as a collaborative project between ethnographic filmmaker, David MacDougall, and the six-year old Arnav Koshy, this film explores Arnav's keenly observant view of the complex world around him. Arnav is fascinated by the geology, plant-life, and ecology of the area in which he lives: a dry and rocky region of Andhra Pradesh in South India. Made in a direct and unobtrusive style, the film is both an engaging interactive encounter between a child and an adult, and a compelling demonstration of Arnav's enquiring mind and his emerging understanding of life. This delightful and deceptively simple film is a distinctive contribution to the remarkable body of work that David MacDougall has made with and about children in India since his landmark DOON SCHOOL CHRONICLES (2000)."--Publisher's website
Awareness by Jeroen van Westen( Visual )

8 editions published between 2010 and 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Filmed in South India at Rishi Valley School, founded by the 20th Century Indian thinker Jiddu Krishnamurti, Awareness explores the sensibilities of two groups of young Indian teenagers - a group of boys in theirs - as they live out their daily experiences at the school. The two groups were filmed separately by David and Judith MacDougall over a period of several months. The film was released in 2010. The film highlights gender differences at a critical stage of adolescence and demonstrates how Krishnamurti's encouragement of each individuals' awareness is played out at the school. With humour and attention to the processes of learning, the film provides an insight into education at one of the leading progressive schools of the Indian Subcontinent"--Container
Doon School Project by David MacDougall( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 208 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the fifth and final film in renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall's Doon School Quintet, his long-term study of India's most prestigious boys' boarding school. In this film he focuses on the life of one student whom he discovers at the school. The film explores the thoughts and feelings of Abhishek, a 12-year-old from Nepal, during his first days and weeks as a Doon student. This remarkable and intimate documentary is at once the story of the encounter between a filmmaker and his subject and a glimpse into the mind of a child at 'the age of reason.' Along with 'Doon School Chronicles, ' 'With Morning Hearts, ' 'Karam in Jaipur, ' and 'The New Boys, ' this compelling individual and cultural portrait will take its place among the classics of ethnographic cinema. It will stimulate thought and discussion in a wide range of classes in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, visual anthropology, education and childhood studies, and post-colonial studies
Doon School Project by David MacDougall( Visual )

2 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This absorbing documentary is the third film in renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall's long-term, five-part study of childhood and adolescence at the Doon School in northern India. The school is India's foremost boarding school for boys, and the series provides unique insights into the values and training of the Indian middle class in particular and postcolonial elites more generally. With great sensitivity to social, material, and aesthetic details and a keen eye for significant moments of interaction and emotion, "Karam in Jaipur" reveals the day-to-day ups and downs of a schoolboy's life. It follows Karam, the main character of the earlier "With Morning Hearts," into the next phase of his life in Jaipur House, one of the five "Main" houses of the school. There he must keep up with his classmates, contend with the authority of older boys, and try to make his mark by developing some of his talents. During the period covered by the film, he discovers an aptitude for gymnastics and works to achieve success in the yearly competition. He plays hockey, sings, and struggles to settle into the House. Without being judgmental, the film gives a penetrating insight into Karam's experiences and into the aspirations of the Indian middle class in one of its most characteristic postcolonial institutions. This highly nuanced and remarkable documentary will inspire discussion in classes in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, visual anthropology, education and childhood studies, and post-colonial studies
Doon School Project by David MacDougall( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This landmark documentary is the fourth film in renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall's long-term, five-part study of childhood and adolescence at the Doon School in northern India. This film focuses on life in a school dormitory. A new group of 12-year-old students is arriving to start their lives at the school. The film follows them from their first day, exploring their emotional and intellectual lives as they experience homesickness, fights, classroom teaching, and the stirrings of group identity. Although these boys are the same age as those in the earlier "With Morning Hearts," the group dynamics captured here are very different from that film. Within the group are boys of varied personalities and backgrounds -- some natural leaders, some subject to teasing and bullying, some argumentative, some peace-makers. Especially notable are the conversations among the boys about such matters as the causes of aggression and warfare, homesickness, restaurant food, and how to speak to a ghost. Along with 'Doon School Chronicles, ' 'With Morning Hearts, ' and 'Karam in Jaipur, ' this profound cultural portrait will take its place among the classics of ethnographic cinema. It will generate thought and discussion in a wide range of classes in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, visual anthropology, education and childhood studies, and post-colonial studies
Doon School Project by David MacDougall( Visual )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This remarkable new documentary by renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall continues his long-term study of the Doon School, India's most prestigious boys' boarding school. Sometimes called "the Eton of India," Doon School has nevertheless developed its own characteristic style and presents a curious mixture of privilege and egalitarianism. With great sensitivity to social, material, and aesthetic details and a keen eye for significant moments of interaction and emotion, 'With Morning Hearts' focuses on a group of twelve-year-olds during their first year in one of the "houses" for new boys. The film explores the boys' attachment to the house but, more importantly, their attachment to one another in a communal life. It follows, in particular, the experiences of one boy and several of his close associates, from their initial homesickness, to their life as members of the group, to their separation from the house at the end of the year. The film's title is taken from a school prayer: Call us up with morning faces, And with morning hearts, Eager to labor, eager to be happy, If happiness shall be our portion, And if the day be marked for sorrow, Strong to endure it. Doon school was established by a group of Indian nationalists in the 1930s to produce a new generation of leaders who would guide the nation after Independence. Since then it has become highly influential in the creation of the new Indian elites and has come to epitomize many aspects of Indian post-coloniality. Along with 'Doon School Chronicles, ' 'With Morning Hearts' is a revelatory cultural portrait that will take its place among the classics of ethnographic cinema. It will stimulate discussion and analysis in a wide array of classes in cultural anthropology, Asian and Indian studies, visual anthropology, education and childhood studies, and post-colonial studies
Turkana conversations( Visual )

1 edition published in 1980 in Nilo-Saharan and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This, the first film in renowned ethnographic filmmakers David and Judith MacDougall's classic Turkana Conversations Trilogy, is a multifaceted portrait of Lorang, the head of the homestead and one of the important senior men of the Turkana. Because they are relatively isolated and self-sufficient, most Turkana (including Lorang's son) see their way of life continuing unchanged into the future. But Lorang thinks otherwise, for he has seen something of the outside world."Lorang's Way" is a study of a man who has come to see his society as vulnerable and whose traditional role in it has been shaped by that realization. The film explores Lorang's personality and ideas through his conversations with the filmmakers, the testimony of his friends and relatives, and observation of his behavior with his wives, his children, and men of his own age and status
Turkana Conversations( Visual )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this, the second film in renowned ethnographic filmmakers David and Judith MacDougall's classic Turkana Conversations Trilogy, one of Lorang's daughters, Akai, is going to marry one of his friends and age-mates, Kongu. Because of the close ties between the two men everything should go smoothly, but the pressures within the two families are such that the wedding negotiations over the bridewealth become increasingly tense. Arranging the number and type of animals to be given as bridewealth demands an intricate balance between psychology and economics: Kongu must offer enough animals to please Lorang and his relatives, but not so many that he appears weak or foolish, or depletes his own family's herds. Negotiations drag on for several days, then threaten to break down altogether. The outcome depends not only on traditional patterns of behavior, but also on the influence exerted by Lorang's wives and the manner in which Lorang chooses to resolve the dilemma that confronts him
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Transcultural cinema
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Transcultural cinemaThe looking machine : essays on cinema, anthropology and documentary filmmaking
Alternative Names
David MacDougall American visual anthropologist and documentary filmmaker

David MacDougall Amerikaans filmmaker

Mac Dougall, David

Mac Dougall David 1939-....

Mc Dougall, David

Mc Dougall David 1939-....

McDougall, David

McDougall David 1939-....

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