WorldCat Identities

World Bank Social Development

Overview
Works: 113 works in 150 publications in 1 language and 843 library holdings
Roles: Other
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about World Bank
 
Most widely held works by World Bank
Social capital, household welfare and poverty in Indonesia by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

8 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It pays for poor households to participate actively in local associations. At low incomes, the returns to social capital are higher than returns to human capital. At higher incomes, the reverse is true
Poverty correlates and indicator-based targeting in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Christiaan Grootaert( )

6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

July 1998 Social protection systems in the transition economies have been inadequate to meet the challenges of transition, being both costly and poorly targeted. The largest group of poor people is the working poor-especially workers with little education (primary education or less) or outdated vocational or technical education. Grootaert and Braithwaite compare poverty in three Eastern European countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland) with poverty in three countries of the former Soviet Union (Estonia, Kyrgyz Republic, and Russia). They find striking differences between the post-Soviet and Eastern European experiences with poverty and targeting. Among patterns detected: * Poverty in Eastern Europe is significantly lower than in former Soviet Union countries. * Rural poverty is greater than urban poverty. * In Eastern Europe there is a strong correlation between poverty incidence and the number of children in a household; in the former Soviet Union countries this is less pronounced, except in Russia. * There is a gender and age dimension to poverty in some countries. In single-person households, especially of elderly women, the poverty rate is very high (except in Poland) and poverty is more severe. The same is true in pensioner households (except in Poland). In Poland the pension system has adequate reach. * Poverty rates are highest among people who have lost their connection with the labor market and live on social transfers (other than pensions) or other nonearned income. But through sheer mass, the largest group of poor people is the working poor-especially workers with little education (primary education or less) or outdated vocational or technical education. Only those with special skills or university education escape poverty in great numbers, thanks to the demand for their skills from the newly emerging private sector. * The poverty gap is remarkably uniform in Eastern European countries, especially Hungary and Poland, suggesting that social safety nets have prevented the emergence of deep pockets of poverty. This is much less true in the former Soviet Union, where those with the highest poverty rate also have the largest poverty gap. In the short to medium term, creating employment in the informal sector will generate a larger payoff than creating jobs in the formal (still to be privatized) sector, so programs to help (prospective) entrepreneurs should take center stage in poverty alleviation programs. This paper is a joint product of the Social Development Department and Europe and Central Asia, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Sector Unit. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Poverty and Targeting of Social Assistance in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union (RPO 680-33). The authors may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org or jbraithwaite@worldbank.org
Local institutions, poverty and household welfare in Bolivia by Christiaan Grootaert( )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

July 2001 Social capital--including membership in an association such as an agrarian syndicate--reduces the probability of being poor in Bolivia. The returns to household investment in social capital are generally greater for the poor than for the rich, and greater for households with little land than for those with more land. Returns to such membership for Bolivia's poorest exceed returns to education and other assets. Grootaert and Narayan empirically estimate the impact of social capital on household welfare in Bolivia - where they found 67 different types of local associations. They focus on household memberships in local associations as being especially relevant to daily decisions that affect household welfare and consumption. On average, households belong to 1.4 groups and associations: 62 percent belong to agrarian syndicates, 16 percent to production groups, 13 percent to social service groups, and 10 percent to education and health groups. Smaller numbers belong to religious and government groups. Agrarian syndicates, created by government decree in 1952, are now viewed mainly as community-initiated institutions to manage communal resources. They have been registered as legal entities to work closely with municipalities to represent the interests and priorities of local people in municipal decisionmaking. The effects of social capital operate through (at least) three mechanisms: sharing of information among association members; the reduction of opportunistic behavior; and better collective decisionmaking. The effect of social capital on household welfare was found to be 2.5 times that of human capital. Increasing the average educational endowment of each adult in the household by one year (about a 25-percent increase) would increase per capita household spending 4.2 percent; a similar increase in the social capital endowment would increase spending 9 to 10.5 percent. They measured social capital along six dimensions: density of memberships, internal heterogeneity of associations (by gender, age, education, religion, etc.), meeting attendance, active participation in decisionmaking, payment of dues (in cash and in kind), and community orientation. The strongest effect came from number of memberships. Active membership in an agrarian syndicate is associated with an average 11.5 percent increase in household spending. Membership in another local association is associated with a 5.3-percent higher spending level. Empirical results partly confirm the hypothesis that social capital provides long-term benefits such as better access to credit and a higher level of trust in the community as a source of assistance in case of need. This paper--a joint product of the Social Development Department and the Poverty Division, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network--is part of a larger effort in the Bank to understand better the role of local institutions, and social capital in general, for poverty reduction. The authors may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org or dnarayan@worldbank.org
Cents and sociability household income and social capital in rural Tanzania by Deepa Narayan-Parker( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Local institutions, poverty and household welfare in Bolivia by Christiaan Grootaert( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Child labor in Côte d'Ivoire : incidence and determinants by Christiaan Grootaert( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

March 1998 Most children in Côte d'Ivoire perform some kind of work. In rural areas, more than four of five children work, with only a third combining work with schooling. Child labor in Côte d'Ivoire increased in the 1980s because of a severe economic crisis. Two out of three urban children aged 7 to 17 work; half of them also attend school. In rural areas, more than four out of five children work, but only a third of them manage to combine work with schooling. Full-time work is less prevalent, but not negligible. Roughly 7 percent of urban children work full time (an average 46 hours a week). More than a third of rural children work full time (an average of 35 hours a week), with the highest incidence in the Savannah region. The incidence of such full-time work rises with age but is by no means limited to older children. The average age of the full-time child worker in Côte d'Ivoire is 12.7. These children have received an average 1.2 years of schooling. That child is also more likely to be ill or injured and is less likely to receive medical attention than other children. Urban children in the interior cities are far more likely to work and their working hours are much longer. Among rural children, those in the Savannah region (where educational infrastructure lags far behind the rest of the country) are most likely to work. Five factors affect a household's decision to supply child labor: * The age and gender of the child (girls are more likely to work, especially when the head of household is a woman). * The education and employment status of the parents (low parental education is a good targeting variable for interventions). * The availability of within-household employment opportunities. * The household's poverty status. * The household's location (calling for geographical targeting). With improved macroeconomic growth, it is hoped, child labor will decline-but a significant decline could take several generations. Meanwhile, it is important to: * Use a gradual approach toward the elimination of child work by aiming initial interventions at facilitating combined work and schooling. * Support the development of home enterprises as part of poverty alleviation programs, but combine it with incentives for school attendance. * Make school hours and vacation periods flexible (accommodating harvest times) in rural areas. This would also improve children's health. * Improve rural school attendance by having a school in the village rather than 1 to 5 kilometers away. * Improve educational investment in the Savannah. This paper is a product of the Social Development Department. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Child Labor: What Role for Demand-Side Interventions (RPO 680-64). The author may be contacted at cgrootaert@worldbank.org
A guide for local benefit sharing in hydropower projects by Chaogang Wang( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Local Government Taxation Reform in Tanzania A Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA), Report on Economic and Sector Work by World Bank( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 2005 Tanzania poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) on local government tax reform was designed to examine the intended and unintended consequences on poverty reduction and growth in Tanzania of the tax reforms implemented in June 2003 and 2004. The main elements of the reform were the abolition of the flat rate development levy in 2003 along with nuisance taxes, and the abolition of business license fees for enterprises below a certain size and capping of those fees for larger enterprises in 2004. This PSIA had two principal aims: (a) to assess the distribution of the tax burden across different social and income groups and small businesses before and after the reforms; and (b) to inform other initiatives directed at fiscal policy reform in the context of Tanzania's decentralization
Social development & infrastructure : working in partnership for sustainable development( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper lays out how social development can help enhance the quality of infrastructure operations and avoid potential risks. This note (1) reviews major challenges for sustainable infrastructure, (2) outlines how social development approaches help meet those challenges, (3) briefly highlights the main social development analytic and operational tools, and (4) provides on-the ground operational examples to demonstrate social development at work. With an overarching focus on inclusion, governance, and managing social and political risk, Social Development specialists work with task teams on five key areas: 1. Improve people's access and promote social inclusion; 2. Mitigate adverse impacts and manage political and social risks; 3. Enhance governance and reduce corruption through voice and participation; 4. Promote inclusion of the most vulnerable and protect involuntarily displaced and Indigenous Peoples; and 5. Reduce risks in post conflict and potential conflict settings
Yemen's water sector reform program : a poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA)( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents the findings of a Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA) of Yemen's water sector reform program. PSIA is the analysis of the distributional impacts of policy reforms on the well-being or welfare of different stakeholder groups, with a particular focus on the poor and vulnerable. PSIA also examines vested interests to assess issues of sustainability and risk in policy reform. Among other analyses, the study builds on the Yemen Country Water Resource Assistance Strategy (CWRAS, World Bank 2005a) and the Country Social Analysis (CSA, World Bank 2006a). The CWRAS had identified the political economy as main constraint to water sector reform. The CSA assessed livelihoods and power relations in Yemeni society, and called specifically for a poverty and social impact analysis in the water sector. The PSIA recommendations, which address the above key messages, will be implemented through the NWSSIP Update and operations
Social analysis in the urban sector : a guidance note( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This note begins by examining these three major aspects of the urban social challenge: the urbanization of poverty, the role of civic participation, and the critical importance of governance. It then examines specific social challenges related to seven aspects of the urban portfolio: settlement interventions, the formalization of secure tenure, conflict in urban environments, disaster mitigation and recovery, solid waste management, HIV/AIDS, and cultural heritage. It then reviews the analytical framework for urban social analysis including a list of five social entry points (equality of opportunity and access, genuine participation, strong institutions, social risk management, and social impact monitoring and evaluation) that can be explored in any urban context. And finally it outlines the actual process of integrating social analysis in the project cycle
The political economy of policy reform : issues and implications of policy dialogue and development operations( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study addresses the political economy of sector reforms. Sustainable reform processes which improve equity, efficiency and effectiveness in key economic and social sectors are often important elements of national poverty reduction strategies in low- and middle-income countries. For international development agencies wishing to engage in these processes, understanding the significance of power relations within the sector, vested interests, and the links to national political processes can be critical to being an effective actor in policy dialogue. This study explores these issues through the analysis of case studies of World Bank engagement in two areas: agricultural liberalization, and public-private partnerships in water supply and sanitation. The objectives of the study are twofold: (a) to analyze the political economy of reform by looking at stakeholder interests, incentives, institutions, risks, opportunities, and processes from a social analysis perspective; and (b) to illustrate 'what works, why and how' for a better understanding and management of political economy issues in the design and implementation of reforms and development operations. The study draws on operational experiences to inductively develop a conceptual framework that offers an innovative way to look at the political economy of policy reforms. The study presents a solid basis for a future program of work which can address these issues
Civil society and peacebuilding : potential, limitations and critical factors( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Local government discretion and accountability : application of a local governance framework( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA) Reviewing the Link with In-Country Policy and Planning Processes - Synthesis Report by World Bank( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The synthesis report concerns to go beyond a summary of the country studies to provide lessons and recommendations on how to further improve Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA) effectiveness. To do so, it draws on findings from country case studies, the literature and recent internal Bank reviews (World Bank 2006, 2008) on PSIA. The synthesis is structured in three parts. Section two reviews the role of PSIA in country work drawing on internal guidance from the Bank and the wider literature. It introduces the PSIA framework and the main elements of an effective PSIA. Section two ends with a presentation of the review framework and the approach to sampling and methodology for the country studies. Section three presents the bulk of the review findings and lessons learned with a focus on lessons for embedding PSIA into country processes. Section four addresses the future of PSIA with recommendations aimed at: (i) improving the influence that PSIA has on policy and planning processes in-country, and (ii) ensuring that it is applied more routinely by partner governments and Bank programs
Strengthening Rural Local Institutional Capacities for Sustainable Livelihoods and Equitable Development by Norman Thomas Uphoff( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In considering the contribution that Rural Local Institutions (RLIs) can make to Sustainable Livelihoods (SLs), authors bring together two important concerns that emerged among development practitioners in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. RLIs are important for addressing and mitigating factors of insecurity and instability, dealing in particular with various aspects of vulnerability. RLIs can also support participation (voice), conflict mitigation (peace), and external linkage (market expansion). Generally they produce a variety of public goods at local levels even if focused on narrower objectives. Households and communities are multiply linked, or potentially linked, having many economic, social, information and other connections with distant kin, enterprises and diverse institutions within the country and often internationally. This paper focused on institutions that in fact have some organizational structure, seeking to make them more amenable to introduction and improvement. These are institutions that can have leadership and purposeful direction. Those of which this cannot be said are certainly of similar importance; however, they function very differently
Enhancing Development Benefits to Local Communities in Hydropower Projects Technical Workshop by World Bank( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The technical workshop on enhancing development benefits to local communities in hydropower projects was held in Washington, D.C., on June 26, 2008. It was hosted by the Social Development Department (SDV) and Water Anchor (ETWWA) of the World Bank. The workshop aimed to provide a platform for a discussion of past and current practices, as well as how to construct development benefits mechanisms within the specific context of hydropower projects. It also provided a forum for sharing knowledge as to how development benefits mechanisms may be applied to Bank-financed projects. The workshop had five sessions and brought together more than 60 experts from different sectors in different regions of the World Bank. Sixteen speakers gave presentations. The workshop had discussions on enhancing development benefits to local communities in hydropower projects and also covered issues pertaining to the broader range of benefit-sharing, including World Bank engagement in hydropower projects, legacy of hydropower, notion evolution, approaches and mechanisms, and good practices in benefit-sharing of hydropower projects. A range of mechanisms are available to enhance and share benefits. Benefit-sharing consists of a combination of monetary and non-monetary mechanisms adapted to specific project contexts. Monetary development benefits are linked largely to economic rent, fair distribution, full compensation, entitlements, national priorities, and optimization of opportunities, and include basically taxation, royalties, preferential rates, revenue sharing, development funds, and joint ownership. The non-monetary development benefits include, for example, allocation of fishing rights in reservoirs; priority hiring of local community members during construction; start-up support for local companies; capacity building; multipurpose infrastructure; rural electrification; and access to improved infrastructure
The enabling environment for social accountability in Mongolia by Linda Beck( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New paths to social development : community and global networks in action : a contribution of the World Bank to the United Nations Special Session of the General Assembly : World Summit for Social Development and Beyond : Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World, Geneva, June 2000 by World Summit for Social Development and Beyond: Achieving Social Development for All in a Globalizing World( Book )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Realizing Rights Through Social Guarantees An Analysis of New Approaches to Social Policy in Latin America and South Africa by World Bank( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the experiences in four Latin American countries and South Africa in the application of a human rights approach to social policy. The paper applies an analysis based on a social guarantees framework -- an innovative approach to integrate a rights-based perspective into social policy. The social guarantees approach moves beyond a purely normative framework to give concrete meaning to economic, social, and cultural rights and hence to allow for their operationalization into policies and programs. This document suggests that a social guarantee approach can be used to strengthen the delivery and monitoring of social programs. Firstly, it implies an institutional design that emphasizes synergy and coordination among agencies and providers to help social programs achieve their full potential. Secondly, this approach contributes to reducing gaps in opportunity among citizens by promoting universal access to, and a basic quality standard for, essential services. Thirdly, the social guarantee approach contributes to strengthening democratic governance, as it requires the achievement of a non-discriminatory agreement among all members of society as to the level of basic entitlements of each individual or collective. In other words, social guarantees are safeguards that society provides to all its members, ensuring their access to essential opportunities and well-being
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.67 (from 0.38 for Social ana ... to 0.89 for List of pu ...)

Alternative Names

controlled identityWorld Bank. Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network

Social development department

World Bank Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network Social Development

World Bank Social development department

Languages
English (49)