WorldCat Identities

US Army Medical Department Center and School

Overview
Works: 858 works in 882 publications in 1 language and 3,198 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History  Pictorial works  Illustrated works  Handbooks and manuals  Maps  Terminology  Military history 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by US Army Medical Department Center and School
Legacy of excellence : the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 1862-2011 by Paul Stone( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 471 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Attack on the Pentagon : the medical response to 9/11 by Mary Ellen Condon-Rall( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pediatric surgery and medicine for hostile environments( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

War psychiatry( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. Army Medical Department journal( )

in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For clinical and nonclinical professional information designed to keep U.S. Army Medical Department personnel informed of healthcare, research, and combat and doctrine development information
The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, 1960-2010 : a 50th anniversary photographic history by Arthur Brown( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

US Army psychiatry in the Vietnam war : new challenges in extended counterinsurgency warfare by Norman M Camp( Book )

2 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 175 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

NOTE: NO FURTHER DISCOUNT FOR THIS PRODUCT -- OVERSTOCK SALE - Significantly reduced list price This book tells the mostly forgotten story of the accelerating mental health problems that arose among the troops sent to fight in South Vietnam, especially the morale, discipline, and heroin crisis that ultimately characterized the second half of the war. This situation was unprecedented in U.S. military history and dangerous, and reflected the fact that during the war America underwent its most divisive period since the Civil War and, as a result, the war became bitterly controversial. The author
US Army physician assistant handbook by U. S. Army Medical Department (U. S.) The Borden Institute( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 155 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Forensic and ethical issues in military behavioral health by Elspeth Cameron Ritchie( Book )

2 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pediatric surgery and medicine for hostile environments( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Borden compendium( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Basic medical terminology( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pediatric surgery and medicine for hostile environments by United States( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Musket and arrow : a guide to U.S. Army staff ride sites in southern Texas by Wayne R Austerman( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of the MTFS : active duty ambulatory care visits at US Army Medical Treatment Facilities in 1999 by US Army Medical Department Center and School( Book )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study was to examine all 1999 active duty (AD) use of the Army's ambulatory treatment facilities, characterize various levels of use, and identify what constitutes a high user. Data were obtained from the DoD Ambulatory Data System as Standard Ambulatory Data Records. Data on Physical Evaluation Boards from the U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency were added to the visit records. A total of 4,727,815 visits made by 647,017 patients were analyzed. Data were summarized by five views: (1) Overall, (2) Top 30 Primary Diagnoses visits, (3) Top 10% High Users, (4) High User Outliers (total visits exceeded 3 standard deviations above mean), and (5) Low Users (1-4 visits). In each view, three subsets of data were examed: Army-wide, by medical treatment facility (except for Top 30 Diagnoses), and Region 6. Five appendices present detailed summaries including total visits and age statistics, and frequency tables of visit and patient demographics and diagnoses and procedures. Mean number of AD visits Army-wide was 7.3 Overall compared to 54.1 for Outliers and 2.2 for Low Users. Noticeable differences between high and low users were identified. Data summaries indicate High User Outliers are likely to be patients: (1) with alcohol dependency/other mental disorder, (2) recovering from surgery/injury and requiring physical therapy/other rehabilitation, (3) female with normal pregnancies, or (4) with chronic back/lower leg joint pain. Logistic regression analyses found several factors significantly associated with being an Outlier including specific categories of gender, marital status, age group, patient beneficiary category, military rank, and number of physical therapy clinic visits
The readiness training program for nursing personnel in the AMEDD : Training manual by US Army Medical Department Center and School( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The world with commanders' areas of responsibility by United States( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Envision, Design, Train : a pictorial history of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center & School, 1920 to 2010 by Adriane Askins Neidinger( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Army Medical Department exists to ensure that soldiers and their families have access to the very best healthcare possible, on the battlefield and at home. The Army Medical Department Center and School (AMEDDC & S) aim has been to provide and advance professional military medical education for the past 90 years. The professionals who work there have always worked, and continue to do so, to ensure healthcare on the battlefield and in humanitarian settings is the very best possible. This volume tells their story in pictures and words. By virtue of its core mission of saving lives on and off the battlefield, the AMEDD has always been a unique organization within the U.S. Army. The AMEDD conserves and advances health, treats patients who become ill and injured, and provides a full range of healthcare services to soldiers and other warriors deployed around the world. Every Army healthcare leader since World War II is a graduate of one or more AMEDDC & S programs of instruction. No Army healthcare soldier can deploy to conflict or combat without first attending school at the AMEDDC & S. The doctrine and organizations used to provide healthcare to America's warriors in combat are written and developed at the AMEDDC & S. Army Medical Department readiness does, indeed, start here. Today's men and women of the AMEDD Center and School carry on the very best traditions first begun on Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, in 1920. From 1946 they continued on Fort Sam Houston, Texas, to the present
Women in the military : pregnancy, command climate, organizational behavior, and outcomes by Mary Ann Evans( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The primary accomplishment of this study was the documentation of pregnant servicewomen's perspectives on what it means to be pregnant in the military and how work experiences influence delivery outcomes, performance, intentions to stay in the military, psychological well-being, and actual turnover. Comparisons of the demographic characteristics of active duly pregnant women with the population of military women were made. A measure of Work Climate was developed and validated. A longitudinal assessment of maternal medical conditions, turnover, work climate work reassignment, career opportunities. Work absences, turnover and delivery outcomes were tested. Most were not reassigned work due to pregnancy. Primary reasons were exposure to hazardous materials and physical requirements. Reassigned participants were more likely to intend to leave the organization. The majority reported pregnancy had no effect on career opportunities. Psychologically healthy pregnant personnel were more likely to perceive better career opportunities, coworker support and intended to stay in the organization. The majority worked at least 40 hours a week and missed less than one day per month throughout pregnancy. Personnel with more medical conditions missed more work. The majority intended to stay prior to and during pregnancy. Turnover intentions and actual turnover were positively associated. Neither turnover intention nor actual turnover were significantly related to baby outcomes. Covariance structural model results indicated rank, tenure, prior turnover intentions, work climate, and health affected turnover. Maternal medical conditions, psychological health, and work climate predicted complicated baby outcomes. Demographics did not predict adverse delivery outcomes. In a longitudinal model, only changes in psychological health predicted adverse delivery outcomes
Identification of bioethical dilemmas, ethical reasoning, and decision-making in military emergency medicine departments by Kendra L Scroggs( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent advances in medical technology and research have made possible an unprecedented level of health care for those living in economically advanced nations like the United States. Fast-acting pharmaceuticals, cardiac defibrillators, assisted-ventilation, telemedicine, artificial organs, and transplantation are just a few of the weapons in our medical arsenal today that simply did not exist only fifty years ago. Nowhere is this more evident than in the pre-hospital or emergency medicine arena, where providers are faced with advanced medical technology that has often made dying a choice rather than an inevitable event. Not coincidentally, the field of bioethics has also experienced unprecedented growth over the same time span, with many of the bioethical issues being driven by the power of our new technological medical prowess. All too often it seems as though medicine asks "Can we?" before asking "Should we?" and therefore many Americans are doubtful that bioethics can ever keep pace with rapidly changing technologies. As technologies advance and the healthcare environment changes, the struggle to identify pertinent bioethical issues has prompted numerous institutional efforts, including initiatives of the American Association of Bioethics, The Center for Bioethics, and the Hastings Center for Bioethics, whose goal is to expand bioethical education and stimulate discussion of bioethical issues
 
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Basic medical terminology
Covers
Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States Army Medical Field Service School

A.M.E.D.D.C.&S.

A.M.E.D.D. Center and School

AMEDD Center and School

AMEDDC&S

Army Academy of Health Sciences

MCCS HSL

T︠s︡entr i shkola voenno-medit︠s︡inskoĭ podgotovki VMU sukhoputnykh voĭsk SShA

U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School

U.S. Army Medical Dept. Center and School

United States Army Medical Department Center & School

United States Army Medical Department Center and School

United States Center and School

US Army Medical Department Center and School

US Army Medical Department Center and School Fort Sam Houston, Tex

US Army Medical Department Center and School Health Readiness Center of Excellence

US Army Medical Dept. Center and School

Центр и школа военно-медицинской подготовки ВМУ сухопутных войск США

Languages
English (47)