WorldCat Identities

Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Overview
Works: 155 works in 271 publications in 1 language and 19,219 library holdings
Genres: Classification  Conference papers and proceedings 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
 
Most widely held works by Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
Guidelines for the prediction and control of methane emissions on longwalls by Steven J Schatzel( )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 318 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Although longwall mining productivity can far exceed that of room-and-pillar mining, the total methane emissions per extracted volume associated with longwall sections are generally higher than those for continuous miner or pillar removal sections. Increased face advance rates, increased productivities, increased panel sizes, and more extensive gate road developments have challenged existing designs for controlling methane on longwalls. Methane control research by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently examined a number of practices designed to maintain concentrations in mine air within statutory limits and consistently below the lower explosive limit. In this report, several practical guidelines are recommended for controlling longwall coalbed methane. All predictions are based on determinations made for the Pittsburgh Coalbed in southwestern Pennsylvania."
Handbook for dust control in mining by Fred N Kissell( )

4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 299 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Behavioral and organizational dimensions of underground mine fires( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 286 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Rock Mass Classification in Underground Mining by Robert J Tuchman( )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 286 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Rock mass classification is widely used throughout the underground mining industry--in both coal and hardrock mines. It is used in all stages of the mining process, from site characterization to production operations. The goal of the International Workshop on Rock Mass Classification in Underground Mining was to provide a forum for leading practitioners of rock mass classification to come together and share their methods and experiences with the technique. The workshop was held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on May 31, 2007"--Page 1
Proceedings : new technology for ground control in multiple-seam mining by Christopher Mark( )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 286 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of systems to monitor blind areas behind trucks used in road construction and maintenance : phase 1 by T. M Ruff( )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 257 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Innovative hazard recognition training for underground limestone miners( )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 256 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Practical demonstrations of ergonomic principles by Susan M Moore( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 246 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) often involve the back, wrist, elbow, and/or shoulder, and occur when workers are exposed over time to MSD risk factors, such as awkward postures, forceful exertions, or repetitive motions. These exposures sometimes occur due to poorly designed workstations, tasks, and/or hand tools [Chaffin et al. 2006; Sanders and McCormick 1993; Silverstein et al. 1996, 1997]. Workers must understand the nature of MSD risk factors and how to avoid exposure to them. In a classroom setting, trainers may discuss ergonomic principles and show examples of MSD risk factors with photographs or videos. However, supplementing training with practical, hands-on demonstrations may further reinforce these ergonomic principles and help workers understand the importance of avoiding exposure to MSD risk factors. Moreover, demonstrations that allow for worker participation result in a greater understanding of the impact exposures to particular MSD risk factors have on workers' bodies. This document consists of a series of demonstrations designed to complement training on ergonomic principles. A description of the materials needed and step-by-step methodology are included in this document. Each demonstration highlights worker participation and uses relatively inexpensive materials. The demonstrations are organized by type of ergonomic principle. Five general topics are addressed: 1. Neutral compared with non-neutral postures; 2. Grip types; 3. Hand-tool selection and use; 4. Fatigue failure and back pain; and, 5. Moment arms and lifting. ."--NIOSHTIC-2
Proceedings of the international workshop on rock mass classification in underground mining, Information Circular (IC) 9498 by International Workshop on Rock Mass Classification in Underground Mining( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Rock mass classification is widely used throughout the underground mining industry - in both coal and hardrock mines. It is used in all stages of the mining process, from site characterization to production operations. The goal of the International Workshop on Rock Mass Classification in Underground Mining was to provide a forum for leading practitioners of rock mass classification to come together and share their methods and experiences with the technique. The workshop was held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on May 31, 2007. It was co-chaired by Christopher Mark, Ph. D., P.E., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA, and Rimas Pakalnis, P. Eng., University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. The proceedings of the workshop contain 16 invited papers from 9 countries, reflecting the international depth and breadth of current practice. Applications in both hard-rock and coal mining are well represented. Some of the topics that were addressed at the workshop include: 1. Major rock mass classification systems used in mining and their variants; 2. Collection of input data through observation, rock testing, and geophysics; 3. Design of mine layouts and rock support systems using classification; 4. Estimation of rock mass strength and other input parameters for numerical models from classification; 5. Applications in weak rock, raise boring, cavability assessment, and other special topics; and, 6. Risk assessment using rock mass classification."--NIOSHTIC-2
Blast area security : flyrock safety( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The NIOSH Office of Mine Safety and Health has released communication products about flyrock safety in the form of informational brochures, flashcards, and toolbox talk materials. Both the mining and construction industries are targeted with these helpful communication tools. These new products can be used as refresher training for employees and as introductory safety materials for onsite visitors. Background Every blast is associated with the fragmentation, and sometimes the projection, of rocks. Flyrock and blast area security dominate blasting-related accidents in surface mining. From 1978 to 2004, 311 people were killed or injured by flyrock at surface mining operations. Poor blast area security was often to blame. Flyrock is any debris that lands outside the designated blasting area. It can vary in mass from marble-sized to car-sized and can be incredibly dangerous and potentially fatal. Flyrock can be the result of an overloaded blast hole, the presence of underground voids, insufficient burden, or an inadequately sized blast area. Proper planning by the blaster is necessary prior to a blast to prevent or minimize the occurrence of flyrock. Forty percent of blasting injuries and fatalities in mining occur when people are within the blast area. Since blasted material is expected to fall within the blast area, good blast area security is essential to ensure the safety of site personnel. Figure 1 illustrates the importance of securing the blast area. Prior to a blast at a surface limestone mine, an equipment operator used his pickup truck to guard a road leading to the blast site. During the blast, a stone was projected through the truck's windshield, killing him. Preblast planning is essential for determining blast area security since each plan has to be site-specific. Following a blast, the blaster should walk the blast area to determine if the designated area was large enough and to see if changes should be made to the next shot to improve site safety. The products described here were developed for use in short safety training sessions such as start-ofshift safety talks at the worksite. The information can be presented in 15-minute segments. The training can be tailored to any work setting by substituting appropriate examples and by discussing the individual teaching points in relation to the worksite."--NIOSHTIC-2
Effectiveness of selected diesel particulate matter control technologies for underground mining applications : isolated zone study, 2003( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of dust collector bags for reducing dust exposure of roof bolter operators( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The laboratory dust collector tests showed that 99.6% of the test dust fed into the collector was captured by the dustbags. Figure 1 shows the condition of the main chamber before and after testing. Total weight gain on the canister filter was over five times greater without use of the bag. The RAM-I unit showed respirable dust levels in the collector exhaust to be over two times higher when tests were conducted without the bags in place. The APS showed that the" number of total dust particles emitted from the exhaust was two times greater when the tests were conducted without the bags. Since nearly all the dust is contained in the bag, operator exposure is improved when emptying the collector box's main chamber. Filter loading is greatly decreased when using the bags, enabling longer periods of drilling without filter removal/cleaning. Pressure drop across the filter for all tests ranged from 3.0 to 3.3 in w.g. when the bag was used and from 4.0 to 8.4 in w.g. without the bag. Filtered air emitted from the collector has less respirable dust and fewer total dust particles when the bags are used. These results show that benefits from use of the bags are realized in all areas of operator exposure. In order to use these bags in underground coal mines, the dustbags must be accepted by MSHA as an optional item for the specific dust collection system and machine model (30 CFR 33). In addition, the collector must be equipped with a predump option and must have a retrofit kit installed inside the collector to connect to the bag. ."--NIOSHTIC-2
Lower respirable dust and noise exposure with an open structure design( )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses the evaluation of three different types of product sizing silica sand structures: a masonry design, a steel-sided design, and an open structure design. Suggests that the open structure design (no walls) is superior from both a dust and noise (health) standpoint compared to the other two structures
Float coal dust explosion hazards( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In underground coal mining, dust is produced at the face, at conveyors, at transfer points, and by the normal movement of workers and machines. The coarse coal dust particles settle rapidly. However, the fine coal particles remain airborne much longer, and the ventilating air can move this fine dust relatively long distances into the returns before settling. This fine dust is called float coal dust. It generally consists of particles of coal that pass a 200-mesh sieve (particles smaller than 75 micrometers). Generalized rock dusting is currently the primary means of defense against coal dust explosions in U.S. mines. 30 CFR 75, Subpart E (Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting), requires the use of rock dust in bituminous coal mines (30 CFR 75.402). The regulations state that rock dust shall be distributed upon the top, floor, and sides of all underground areas of a coal mine in such quantities that the incombustible content of the combined coal dust, rock dust, and other dust shall be not less than 65%, and the incombustible content in the return air courses (where the dust is expected to be finer) shall be no less than 80% (30 CFR 75.403). These incombustible concentrations assume that the coal and rock dust are not layered, but are intimately mixed. Float coal dust is a serious explosion hazard if it accumulates on top of the rock dust and is not mixed thoroughly with the rock dust."--NIOSHTIC-2
New technology for ground control in multiple-seam mining( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

EZ-Up curtain stoppings : a practical solution for directing ventilation airflows in large-opening metal/nonmetal mines( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Improve drill dust collector capture through better shroud and inlet configurations( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Overexposure to airborne respirable crystalline silica (or quartz) dust can cause serious or fatal respiratory disease. In particular, some of the most severe cases of silicosis have been observed in surface mine rock drillers. A voluntary lung screening study conducted on surface coal mine workers in Pennsylvania concluded that the incidence rate of silicosis is directly related to age and years of drilling experience. Dust sampling data from the Mine Safety and Health Administration show that the drilling machine operator continues to frequently exceed the federally mandated quartz dust standard. Dry dust collection systems tend to be the most common type of dust control incorporated into drilling machines by original equipment manufacturers because of their capability to operate in various climates. This system includes a self-cleaning (compressed air back pulsing filters) dry dust collector sucking dust from underneath the drill deck shroud, which surrounds the hole being flushed by compressed air (bailing air). Previous drill studies have shown that over half of the dry collector dust emission problems are from the deck shroud and drill stem bushing leakage."--NIOSHTIC-2
Geomechanics of reinforced cemented backfill in an underhand stope at the Lucky Friday Mine, Mullan, Idaho( )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The partial cab : a new noise engineering control for surface drill rigs( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recirculation filter is key to improving dust control in enclosed cabs( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityPittsburgh Research Center (U.S.)

Krajowy Instytut Bezpieczeństwa Pracy i Zdrowia. Laboratorium Badawcze, Pittsburgh.

Laboratorium Badawcze w Pittsburghu Krajowego Instytutu Bezpieczeństwa Pracy i Zdrowia.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Pittsburgh Research Laboratory

NIOSH PGH Research Lab

NIOSH. Pittsburgh Research Laboratory.

Pittsburgh Research Center (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Pittsburgh Research Laboratory of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Languages
English (57)