WorldCat Identities

Bird, Alexander 1964-

Overview
Works: 21 works in 154 publications in 5 languages and 4,034 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  History  Bibliography  Juvenile works  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Alexander Bird
Thomas Kuhn by Alexander Bird( )

33 editions published between 2000 and 2014 in 4 languages and held by 1,573 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Thomas S. Kuhn (1922-1996) transformed the philosophy of science. His seminal 1962 work, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, sold over one million copies and was translated into more than a dozen languages. It introduced the term "paradigm shift" into the vernacular and remains a fundamental text in the study of the history and philosophy of science. This introduction to Kuhn's ideas situates The Structure of Scientific Revolutions within the development of his thought over time." "Alexander Bird explains Kuhn's central distinction between normal and revolutionary science and then examines in detail the role played by the key notion of a paradigm in his account of radical scientific change. The book considers Kuhn's claim that the scientist's world changes when paradigms change and relates this thought to his views on perception, incommensurability, and meaning." "The author engages with the main criticisms of Kuhn's philosophy. Examining Kuhn's thought in relation to its historical context as well as other more recent philosophies of science, Alexander Bird argues that Kuhn's thinking betrays a residual commitment to many theses characteristic of the empiricists he set out to challenge. His book concludes by looking at Kuhn's influence on the history and philosophy of science and asks where the field may be heading in the wake of Kuhn's ideas." "Accessible to those with little formal philosophy training, this is an assured and engaging read for anyone interested in Kuhn's pivotal ideas."--Jacket
Philosophy of science / Alexander Bird by Alexander Bird( )

44 editions published between 1988 and 2010 in English and held by 1,505 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First published by UCL press, 1998
Nature's metaphysics : laws and properties by Alexander Bird( Book )

26 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 568 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bird, a world-leader in the field, offers an original approach to key issues in philosophy. He discusses hot topics in metaphysics and the philosophy of science
Properties, powers, and structures : issues in the metaphysics of realism by Alexander Bird( Book )

16 editions published between 2011 and 2016 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While the phrase "metaphysics of science" has been used from time to time, it has only recently begun to denote a specific research area where metaphysics meets philosophy of science--and the sciences themselves. The essays in this volume demonstrate that metaphysics of science is an innovative field of research in its own right. The principle areas covered are: The modal metaphysics of properties: What is the essential nature of natural properties? Are all properties essentially categorical? Are they all essentially dispositions, or are some categorical and others dispositional?
Arguing about science( Book )

14 editions published between 2011 and 2013 in English and held by 164 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This title offers a selection of thought-provoking articles that examine a broad range of issues, from the demarcation problem, induction and explanation to contemporary issues such as the relationship between science and race and gender, and science and religion
Arguing about Science - Bird & Ladyman by Alexander Bird( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arguing About Science is an outstanding, engaging introduction to the essential topics in philosophy of science, edited by two leading experts in the field. This exciting and innovative anthology contains a selection of classic and contemporary readings that examine a broad range of issues, from classic problems such as scientific reasoning; causation; and scientific realism, to more recent topics such as science and race; forensic science; and the scientific status of medicine. The editors bring together some of the most influential contributions of famous philosophers in the field, including
Metaphysics in science( Book )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Natural kinds by Alexander Bird( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arithmetic, grammar and ontology by Alexander Bird( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Realism and religion : philosophical and theological perspectives by Michael Scott( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book draws together a distinguished group of philosophers and theologians to present new thinking on realism and religion. The religious realism/antirealism debate concerns the questions of God's independence from human beings, the nature of religious truth and our access to religious truths. Although both philosophers and theologians have written on these subjects, there has been little sustained investigation into these issues akin to that found in comparable areas of research such as ethics or the philosophy of science. In addition, the absence of any agreed approach to the problem underlines both the need for fresh thought on it and the fruitfulness of this area for further research." "The editors' introduction sets the context of the realism debate, traces connections amongst the essays which follow, and proposes lines for future development and enquiry. The contributors present a variety of contrasting positions on key issues in the religious realism debate and each opens up new and important themes. Gordon Kaufman, Peter Lipton and Simon Blackburn provide the opening chapters and the context for the collection; Alexander Bird, John Hare, Graham Oppy and Nick Trakakis, Merold Westphal, and John Webster explore topics that are central to the debate. This volume of original essays will both introduce newcomers to the field and suggest new lines of research for those already familiar with it."--Jacket
The Alejandro tree by Margaret Gartland( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A true holiday story inspired by the kindness and spirit of a child at the Hillcrest Educational Center. It captures much of the heart and soul of the work Hillcrest does for kids and families every day. The book shows how one act of kindness can make a difference in the lives of others
Realism by Alexander Bird( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The deep extent of mental autonomy by William Conway( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The central aim of this thesis is to argue that the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation presents a stronger constraint on what counts as a satisfactory statement of the relation between the mental and the physical than can be acknowledged within the metaphysical framework of non-reductive physicalism. Although the chief merit of non-reductive physicalism appears to be its ability to respect the irreducibility of mental concepts to physical concepts, whilst respecting the primacy of the physical ontology, I claim that its commitment to the principles of physicalism prevents that framework from being able to accommodate what I will refer to as the deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation. The deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation manifests itself in the fact that the work carried out by mentalistic explanations is completely separate from the work carried out by physicalistic explanations. I claim that the deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation cannot be recognised within a metaphysical framework which claims to recognise the primacy of the physical ontology because recopsing deep autonomy requires giving up the assumption that the mental must be related to the physical in the manner appropriate to discharging such metaphysical principles. I defend the claim that we can recognise the deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation if we take our successful explanatory practices as the starting point of our investigation, and only then revert to the question of how best to articulate the relation between the mental and the physical. My claim is that there is an intrinsic connection between the nature of the mental and the nature of human relationships, and I therefore suggest that the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation ought to be understood in connection with the autonomous nature of human relationships. The basic ideas in this thesis are derived by combining features of Wittgenstein's rule following considerations with features of John MacMurray's approach to human relationships. On the basis of this combination, I argue for the more specific claim that there is an intrinsic connection between what it means to say that an individual has the capacity to think and what it means to say that he has the capacity to be involved in various types of human relationships. This connection is then used to develop a non-causal account of human action to challenge the physicalist 's causal account, which will be used to support the claim that mentalistic explanations are autonomous with respect to physicalistic explanations in the deeper sense. I conclude by arguing that the considerations which put us in position to recognise the deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation ought to constrain our statement of the relation between the mental and the physical, and I suggest that this statement should be consistent with the way in which mentalistic and physicalistic explanations carry out their work in our explanatory practices. I claim that individuals are subject to mentalistic explanations in so far as they have a life to live in the world with other people, and that individuals are subject to physicalistic explanations in so far as human beings are creatures whose life has a natural biological dimension. But rather than identifying the mental with the physical, and thereby compromise the deeper extent of the autonomous nature of mentalistic explanation, I suggest that this relation might be understood in terms of the fact that the mental is embedded in the dimension of human life which is constituted by the involvement of individuals in various types of relationshps with each other, and that the dimension of human life in which physicalistic explanations are operative is presupposed as the causal background which must be in place if individuals are to have such a life to live in the world
Meaning change in the context of Thomas S. Kuhn's philosophy by Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thomas S. Kuhn claimed that the meanings of scientific terms change in theory changes or in scientific revolutions. In philosophy, meaning change has been taken as the source of a group of problems, such as untranslatability, incommensurability, and referential variance. For this reason, the majority of analytic philosophers have sought to deny that there can be meaning change by focusing on developing a theory of reference that would guarantee referential stability. A number of philosophers have also claimed that Kuhn's view can be explained by the fact that he accepted and further developed many central tenets of logical empiricism. I maintain that the genesis of Kuhn's meaning theorising lies in his historical approach and that his view of meaning change is justified. Later in his career he attempted to advance a theory of meaning and can be said to have had limited success in it. What is more, recent cognitive science has unexpectedly managed to shed light on Kuhn's insights on the organisation of information in the mind, concept learning, and concept definition. Furthermore, although Kuhn's critique of Putnam's causal theory of reference has often been dismissed as irrelevant, he has a serious point to address. Kuhn thought that the causal theory that works so well with proper names cannot work with scientific terms. He held that conceptual categories are formed by similarity and dissimilarity relations; therefore, several features and not only one single property are needed for determination of extension. In addition, the causal theory requires universal substances as points of reference of scientific terms. Kuhn was a conceptualist, who held that universals do not exist as mind-independent entities and that mind-dependent family resemblance concepts serve the role of universals. Further, at the beginning of his career, Kuhn was interested in the question of what concepts or ideas are and how they change in their historical context. Although he did not develop his theorising on this issue, I demonstrate that this is a genuine problem in the philosophy of history. Finally, Kuhn argued that scientists cannot have access to truth in history because we cannot transcend our historical niche, and as a consequence, the truth of a belief cannot be a reason for theory choice. Instead of truth, we can rely on justification. I also discuss Kuhn's idea that problem-solving is the main aim of science and show that this view can be incorporated into coherentist epistemology
Evidence and Inference( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : I articulate a functional characterisation of the concept of evidence, according to which evidence is that which allows us to make inferences that extend our knowledge. This entails Williamson's equationof knowledge with evidence
Squaring the circle : Hobbes on philosophy and geometry by Alexander Bird( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ke xue zhe xue shi shen me by Alexander Bird( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in Chinese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

I—Fundamental Powers, Evolved Powers, and Mental Powers( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Powers have in recent years become a central component of many philosophers’ ontology of properties. While I have argued that powers exist at the fundamental level of properties, many other theorists of powers hold that there are also non-fundamental powers. In this paper I articulate my reasons for being sceptical about the existing reasons for holding that there are non-fundamental powers. However, I also want to promote a different argument for the existence of a certain class of non-fundamental powers: properties which have natural selection to thank for their existence and nature. Such properties will include functional properties of organisms, and so may also include their mental properties
Natural kinds by Alexander Bird( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Laws of nature by Alexander Bird( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.24 (from 0.03 for Realism an ... to 1.00 for Natural ki ...)

Nature's metaphysics : laws and properties
Covers
Philosophy of science / Alexander BirdNature's metaphysics : laws and propertiesRealism and religion : philosophical and theological perspectives
Alternative Names
Bird, Alexander James 1964-

Languages