WorldCat Identities

Myers, Constance Ashton

Overview
Works: 22 works in 37 publications in 1 language and 550 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Sources  Records and correspondence  Oral histories  Interviews 
Roles: Author, Interviewer
Classifications: HX83, 329.81
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Constance Ashton Myers
 
Most widely held works by Constance Ashton Myers
The prophet's army : Trotskyists in America, 1928-1941 by Constance Ashton Myers( Book )

11 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 432 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The American Trotskyists, 1928-1941 by Constance Ashton Myers( )

5 editions published between 1974 and 1976 in English and Undetermined and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oral history interview with Mary Baker, Augusta Building Trades Council by Mary Ursula Blackwell Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Niels Christensen, Jr., oral history interview by Niels Christensen( )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Topics discussed include his father's support for women's suffrage and his duties as founder, owner, editor, and publisher of Beaufort Gazette newspaper; his father's involvement with the S.C. Dispensary Board, Farmers and Taxpayers League, etc.; relations with the Pollitzer and Kennedy families and others; activities of his mother, Nancy Straton Christensen, a graduate of Radcliffe, as well as interests of other members of the Christensen family (Arthur, Andrea, Frederik Holmes, etc.), including temperance, religion, socialism, etc
Wilhemina Behlmer oral history interview by Wilhemina Behlmer( )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The prophet's Army by Constance Ashton Myers( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Rosamonde Ramsay Boyd oral history interview : by Rosamonde Ramsay Boyd( )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Interview conducted in Spartanburg, S.C., with Rosamonde Boyd, a native of Chattanooga, Tenn., with degrees from Randolph-Macon Women's College, USC, and Duke University; she arrived in S.C. in 1937 and taught at Converse College; interview discusses S.C. activists and local support for women's suffrage in upstate S.C., and her thoughts on women's movement of 1970s
Alderman Duncan oral history interview : by Alderman Duncan( )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Transcript of oral history interview of Alderman Duncan conducted by Constance Myers which focuses on the life of Duncan's mother, Bessie Duncan, who was involved with the suffrage movement in South Carolina
Anita Pollitzer papers by Anita Pollitzer( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Correspondence, speeches, photographs, and printed items documenting Anita Pollitzer's role in the suffrage movement and struggle for equal rights for women, especially through her leadership in the National Woman's Party, 1916-1975. Correspondents include Amelia Earhart, Fannie Hurst, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Alice Paul, Strom Thurmond, Wendell Wilkie, and Pollitzer's husband, Elie C. Edson. Also including research files on Pollitzer, 1975-1990, assembled by Constance Ashton Myers
The effect of Germany's world policy upon Great Britain in an era of colonial and naval competition, 1898-1900 by Constance Ashton Myers( )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Laura M. Bragg oral history interview by Laura M Bragg( )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Interview with Laura M. Bragg, a native of Massachusetts who relocated to Charleston, S.C., in 1909 to direct the Charleston Museum; discusses efforts to secure the vote for women, and other aspects of suffrage activitism
Carrie Pollitzer oral history interview by Carrie Pollitzer( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Topics discussed include Pollitzer's profession as a kindergarten teacher with the New York Kindergarten Association and the South Carolina Training School in Charleston, her affiliations with the National Women's Party, the Charleston Federation of Women's Clubs, and her advocacy of women's admittance to the College of Charleston
Constance Ashton Myers collection( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Some interviews described individually in catalog; for list select AUTHOR search for: Constance Ashton Myers collection
Oral history interview with Mabel Pollitzer, September 19, 1973 interview G-0047-1, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Mabel Pollitzer( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mabel Pollitzer was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1885. After graduating from Memminger, an all-girls school in Charleston, Pollitzer went to Columbia University, where she majored in science and education. After graduating in 1906, she returned to South Carolina to become a biology teacher at Memminger. Pollitzer taught for over forty years and also became involved in various civic activities during the first half of the twentieth century. In this interview, she describes her family background and the personal influence of her father's community involvement while she was growing up. In addition, she describes her participation in the women's suffrage movement in South Carolina. In particular, Pollitzer recalls her belief that pursuing national suffrage was more important than winning suffrage state by state, and as a result, she involved herself in the National Woman's Party. Pollitzer describes how politicians, notably Woodrow Wilson, responded to women's demands for suffrage, and she discusses her perception of women's rights leaders like Susan Frost, Ruth McInness, and Alice Paul. Aside from her advocacy of women's rights, Pollitzer also engaged in various community-centered projects. Here, she focuses on the ways in which she found ways to get her female students interested in science, and she describes her role in such community initiatives as banning the sale of fireworks and helping pass legislation for a free library in Charleston
Oral history interview with Marguerite Tolbert, June 14, 1974 interview G-0062, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Marguerite Tolbert( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Marguerite Tolbert worked in South Carolina schools and universities to improve educational options for adults, especially women and illiterate individuals. This interview starts with a description of her education and graduation from a high school in South Carolina in 1910. She retells a few stories about her life from a book she co-wrote titled South Carolina's Distinguished Women from Laurens County. She recounts how she earned a scholarship to Winthrop College and discusses the greatest achievements of her teaching career. Tolbert also describes her colleagues in the teaching profession, including Wil Lou Gray and Dr. D.B. Johnson, the president of Winthrop. She recounts two speeches she made before the South Carolina State House. She explains her views on the suffrage movement and the views of the Winthrop College president. Tolbert also recalls President Hoover's visit to King's Mountain State Park in 1931 and Jane Addams's visit to Winthrop. Tolbert taught in a variety of schools and describes her course content and methodology. She describes directing a training school for boys and how she dealt with a sexist salary clash between teachers in the 1940s
Oral history interview with Lucy Somerville Howorth, June 20, 22, and 23, 1975 interview G-0028, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Lucy Somerville Howorth( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lucy Somerville Howorth was born in Greenville, Mississippi, in 1895. Howorth recalls her mother's political activism as a Mississippi state legislator and as a suffragist. Her mother's leadership and political beliefs strongly informed Howorth's own sensibilities: she recalls that even as a child, she was aware of gender inequality and believed that women should have legal and political equality. By the 1910s, Howorth had become involved in the women's suffrage movement. She helped to organize an Equal Rights Club for women while she attended Randolph-Macon Women's College (1912-1916). During World War I, Howorth lived in New York City, attending graduate school at Columbia University in psychology and economics, working for the Bureau of Allied Aircraft, and working for the YWCA industrial department. In 1920, Howorth decided to become a lawyer and since Columbia did not admit women students to law school, she returned to Mississippi to attend the University of Mississippi law school. One of the only two women law students at Mississippi at the time, Howorth graduated at the top of her class while actively involving herself in school activities. Following her graduation, Howorth practiced law, married Joseph Howorth, also a Southern lawyer, and became a judge. In 1932, during the Great Depression, Howorth successfully ran for the Mississippi State Legislature, where she served until 1936. In 1934, Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed her to serve on the Board of Veterans Appeals--a position she held until 1943. Following World War II, Howorth worked actively to get women appointed to federal positions. Throughout her career, Howorth was involved in numerous women's organizations, including the YWCA, the American Association of University Women, the National Association of Women Lawyers, and the Professional and Businesswomen's Club. She describes her involvement in these organizations, her perception of the women who led them, and how these organizations evolved over the years
Oral history interview with Gov. Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973 interview G-011, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Rosamonde Ramsay Boyd( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rosamonde R. Boyd shares some observations on women's activism in the early 20th century in this interview. She describes the evolution of young women's attitudes, from an assumption that they would teach and raise children after college in the 1910s and 1920s, to a conviction that they would enter the workforce in the 1930s. Boyd is torn between her belief in women's political and social equality and her distaste for blatant violations of traditional gender norms, such as when women wear pants. This interview reveals some of the ways in which even those women who were actively pushing for equal rights wrestled with their own assumptions about gender
Oral history interview with Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973 interview G-0054, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Eulalie Salley( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reflecting on her dedication to women's issues, Eulalie Salley, a suffragist from South Carolina, opens by discussing the reasons she believes the League of Women Voters (LWV) failed to remain influential after women gained the vote in 1920. She argues that though the LWV could have captured women's interests by supporting specific campaigns and candidates, their commitment to nonpartisanship made them seem irrelevant. Before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, suffragists played an active part in South Carolina's political system, and Salley explains how she and other reformers structured their organizations, who their key political allies were, and which women rose to leadership positions. When the South Carolina branch became more organized and influential, the national suffrage organization sent Lola Trax to Columbia to speak before the state legislature. When Trax implemented large publicity stunts to mobilize support, the local women found themselves open to unprecedented censure as other men and women called the femininity of the suffragists into question. Though Salley supported partisanship after gaining the vote, she disagreed with the women's alliance with the Temperance Movement, believing it cost them supporters. In 1915, Salley launched a successful real estate business. Though she encountered some resistance, she linked her activism to her business ventures and gained sales opportunities. She discusses how she balanced her work and family and reflects on whether hiring a nanny was a good decision. Salley describes her impressions of Jeannette Rankin's political and social activism. She also talks about meeting Rankin in 1970 as the two former colleagues relived their activist days
Oral history interview with Mabel Pollitzer, June 16, 1974 interview G-0047-2, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Mabel Pollitzer( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the second of two interviews with Mabel Pollitzer of Charleston, South Carolina. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Pollitzer taught biology at an all-girls school for more than forty years during the first half of the twentieth century. As a young professional woman living in Charleston, Pollitzer became actively involved in the women's suffrage movement in the early 1910s. Here she describes in depth the role of Susan Pringle Frost as a prominent citizen of Charleston and as a leader within the women's suffrage movement as the first president of the Charleston Equal Suffrage League. Pollitzer explains the split within the women's suffrage movement that occurred when Alice Paul split off from the National American Woman Suffrage Association and formed the National Woman's Party, which both Pollitzer and Frost supported, and which advocated not only for women's suffrage but for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. Pollitzer describes the split within the movement as it occurred in 1917. In addition, she describes some of the other causes she pursued as a teacher and community member, namely her effort to change school policies that led to the dismissal of female teachers when they married. Finally, she offers her thoughts on a list of South Carolina suffragists and where they aligned themselves when the movement split
 
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The prophet's army : Trotskyists in America, 1928-1941The prophet's Army
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The prophet's Army