WorldCat Identities

Wiers, Reinout Willem Henry Jon 1966-

Overview
Works: 21 works in 49 publications in 2 languages and 1,433 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers
Handbook of implicit cognition and addiction by Alan W Stacy( )

20 editions published between 2005 and 2013 in English and held by 1,336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Most research on cognitive processes and drug abuse has focused on theories and methods of explicit cognition, asking people directly to introspect about the causes of their behavior. However, it may be questioned to what extent such methods reflect fundamental aspects of human cognition and motivation. In response to this issue, basic cognition researchers have started to assess implicit cognitions, defined as "introspectively unidentified (or inaccurately identified) traces of past experience that mediate feeling, thought, or action." Such approaches are less sensitive to self-justification and social desirability and offer other advantages over traditional approaches underscored by explicit cognition. Wiers' Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction lays the groundwork for new approaches to the study and addictive behaviors as the first handbook to apply principles of implicit cognition to the field of addiction. This Handbook features the work of an interdisciplinary group of internationally renowned contributing North American and European authors who have brought together developments in basic research on implicit cognition with recent developments in addiction research."--Publisher's website
Slaaf van het onbewuste : over emotie, bewustzijn en verslaving by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in Dutch and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nieuwe visie op verslaving, waarbij de invloed van de onbewuste emotionele processen een belangrijke plaats innemen in het schijnbaar irrationele gedrag van de verslaafde
Grip op je problemen : cognitieve training bij verslaving en angst by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in Dutch and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bad expectations? : cognitive and neuropsychological indicators of enhanced risk for alcoholism by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers( Book )

5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Donker bewaren : verhalen by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in Dutch and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Validation of a contextualized assessment of smoking behaviour in students( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reward sensitivity, attentional bias, and executive control in early adolescent alcohol use( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: This study examined whether attentional bias for alcohol stimuli was associated with alcohol use in young adolescents, and whether the frequently demonstrated relationship between reward sensitivity and adolescent alcohol use would be partly mediated by attentional bias for alcohol cues. In addition, this study investigated the potential moderating role of executive control (EC), and tested whether the relationship between alcohol-related attentional bias and alcohol use was especially present in young adolescents with weak EC. Participants were 86 adolescents (mean age = 14.86), who completed a Visual Probe Task (VPT) as an index of attentional bias, a flanker-task based Attention Network Task (ANT) as an index of EC, the sensitivity of punishment and sensitivity of reward questionnaire (SPSRQ) as an index of reward sensitivity, and an alcohol use questionnaire. High reward sensitivity, high alcohol-related attentional bias, and weak EC were all related to alcohol use. The relationship between reward sensitivity and alcohol use was not mediated by alcohol-related attentional bias. As hypothesized, attentional bias was only associated with alcohol use in participants with weak EC. Together, the present findings are consistent with the view that high reward sensitivity and low EC may be considered as risk factors for adolescent alcohol use. The independent contribution of reward sensitivity and attentional bias might suggest that adolescents who are highly reward sensitive and display an attentional bias for alcohol cues are at even higher risk for excessive alcohol use and developing alcohol abuse problems. Future research using a longitudinal approach would allow an examination of these risk factors on subsequent alcohol use. Treatment implications are discussed, including the importance of strengthening EC and reducing the rewarding value of alcohol use. Highlights: Higher reward sensitivity was related to heavier adolescent alcohol use. Alcohol attentional bias was positively related to adolescent alcohol use. Executive control was negatively related to young adolescent alcohol use. Attentional bias predicted alcohol use only in weak executive control adolescents
A clinical trial with combined transcranial direct current stimulation and alcohol approach bias retraining( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Niet nader gecatalogiseerde archivalia] by Reinout Willem Henry Jon Wiers( )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Longitudinal relations between cognitive bias and adolescent alcohol use( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Introduction: To prospectively predict the development of adolescent alcohol use with alcohol-related cognitive biases, and to predict the development of alcohol-related cognitive biases with aspects of impulsivity. Methods: Data were used from a two-year, four-wave online sample of 378 Dutch young adolescents (mean age 14.9 years, 64.8% female). With zero-inflated Poisson regression analysis we prospectively predicted weekly alcohol use using baseline cognitive biases. Additionally, multiple regression analyses were used to prospectively predict the emergence of alcohol-specific cognitive biases by baseline impulsivity and alcohol use. Results: Zero-inflated Poisson analyses demonstrated that the Visual Probe Task reliably predicted weekly alcohol use at different time points. Baseline alcohol use and baseline impulsivity measures did generally not predict alcohol-specific cognitive biases. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that while certain measures of alcohol-related attentional bias predicted later alcohol use in young adolescents, approach biases did not. Baseline measures of impulsivity and alcohol use did not predict later alcohol-related cognitive biases. We discuss implications for cognitive models on the development of cognitive biases and their role in early addictive behaviors. Highlights: We examined whether cognitive biases and impulsivity predicted alcohol use. We examine interaction between impulsivity and alcohol on future cognitive bias. We found that attention bias predicted future alcohol use. We did not find that impulsivity, alcohol or interactions predicted cognitive bias
Controlled and implicit processes in evaluative conditioning on implicit and explicit attitudes toward alcohol and intentions to drink( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Since implicit attitudes (i.e. evaluations occurring outside of complete awareness) are highly predictive of alcohol consumption, we tested an evaluative learning procedure based on repeated pairing to a critical stimulus (i.e. alcohol, the CS) with a valenced stimulus (the US) in order to modify implicit attitudes (i.e. evaluative conditioning; EC). We hypothesized that manipulating the learning context to bolster implicit affect misattribution should strengthen EC effects on implicit attitudes toward alcohol, while encouraging deliberate processing of CS-US pairs, should strengthen EC effects on explicit attitudes. In our study (n = 114 students) we manipulated whether CS-US pairs were presented simultaneously or sequentially. Recollective memory was estimated with a Process Dissociation Procedure. Both implicit and explicit attitudes were assessed immediately after the procedure. Behavioral intentions were measured directly after and one week after the EC-procedure. We found that EC with sequential presentation had a stronger impact on implicit and explicit measures and on purchase intentions immediately after the procedure and one week after. The present findings provide new evidence that (i) EC is an effective way to change implicit attitudes toward alcohol and (ii) evidence that EC may be better described by propositional rather than dual process accounts. Highlights: We found that EC modify implicit attitudes toward alcohol. Attitude change seem to happen through controlled processes. EC lead to change in intentions to drink through controlled processes
Weaknesses in executive functioning predict the initiating of adolescents' alcohol use( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Working memory functioning predicts the initiating of (binge) drinking in adolescents. Response inhibition predicts the initiating of drinking, but not binge drinking in adolescents. Weakness in executive functioning precedes drinking behavior of adolescents. Abstract: Recently, it has been suggested that impairments in executive functioning might be risk factors for the onset of alcohol use rather than a result of heavy alcohol use. In the present study, we examined whether two aspects of executive functioning, working memory and response inhibition, predicted the first alcoholic drink and first binge drinking episode in young adolescents using discrete survival analyses. Adolescents were selected from several Dutch secondary schools including both mainstream and special education (externalizing behavioral problems). Participants were 534 adolescents between 12 and 14 years at baseline. Executive functioning and alcohol use were assessed four times over a period of two years. Working memory uniquely predicted the onset of first drink ( p  = .01) and first binge drinking episode ( p  = .04) while response inhibition only uniquely predicted the initiating of the first drink ( p  = .01). These results suggest that the association of executive functioning and alcohol consumption found in former studies cannot simply be interpreted as an effect of alcohol consumption, as weaknesses in executive functioning, found in alcohol naïve adolescents, predict the initiating of (binge) drinking. Though, prolonged and heavy alcohol use might further weaken already existing deficiencies
De ouder-kind interactie vragenlijst by Alfred Lange( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in Dutch and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Association between attention bias to threat and anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: Considerable research links threat‐related attention biases to anxiety symptoms in adults, whereas extant findings on threat biases in youth are limited and mixed. Inconsistent findings may arise due to substantial methodological variability and limited sample sizes, emphasizing the need for systematic research on large samples. The aim of this report is to examine the association between threat bias and pediatric anxiety symptoms using standardized measures in a large, international, multi‐site youth sample. Methods: A total of 1, 291 children and adolescents from seven research sites worldwide completed standardized attention bias assessment task (dot‐probe task) and child anxiety symptoms measure (Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders). Using a dimensional approach to symptomatology, we conducted regression analyses predicting overall, and disorder‐specific, anxiety symptoms severity, based on threat bias scores. Results: Threat bias correlated positively with overall anxiety symptoms severity (ß=0.078, P =.004). Furthermore, threat bias was positively associated specifically with social anxiety (ß=0.072, P =.008) and school phobia (ß=0.076, P =.006) symptoms severity, but not with panic, generalized anxiety, or separation anxiety symptoms. These associations were not moderated by age or gender. Conclusions: These findings indicate associations between threat bias and pediatric anxiety symptoms, and suggest that vigilance to external threats manifests more prominently in symptoms of social anxiety and school phobia, regardless of age and gender. These findings point to the role of attention bias to threat in anxiety, with implications for translational clinical research. The significance of applying standardized methods in multi‐site collaborations for overcoming challenges inherent to clinical research is discussed
Neural response to alcohol taste cues in youth: effects of the OPRM1 gene( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Genetic variations in the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene have been related to high sensitivity to rewarding effects of alcohol. The current study focuses on the neural circuitry underlying this phenomenon using an alcohol versus water taste-cue reactivity paradigm in a young sample at relatively early stages of alcohol use, thus limiting the confound of variations in duration of alcohol use. Drinkers (17-21 years old) were selected on genotype carrying the AA--(n = 20) or the AG--(n = 16) variant of the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the OPRM1 gene (rs1799971), and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Magnitude of the neural activity and frontostriatal functional connectivity in response to alcohol versus water were investigated. The AG-group demonstrated reduced activation in prefrontal and parietal regions, including the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, superior and inferior parietal lobule, compared with the AA-group. No activation differences were observed in the mesolimbic pathway. Connectivity from the ventral-striatum to frontal regions for alcohol> water trials was higher in the AG than the AA group. For the dorsal-striatum seed region, the AG group showed increased connectivity to non-PFC regions. These results indicate that adolescents carrying the G-allele may be more vulnerable for the alcohol to hijack the reward system in the absence of frontal control to regulate craving. This implies that findings of hyperactivation in the mesolimbic structures of G-allele carriers in earlier studies might result from both genetic susceptibility and heavy drinking. Abstract : In a young sample, we demonstrated reduced prefrontal activation and greater connectivity from the ventral-striatum to frontal regions, in the AG vs AA-variant of the OPRM1 gene (rs1799971) for alcohol> water-taste trials. These results indicate that adolescents carrying the G-allele may be more vulnerable for the alcohol to hijack the reward system in the absence of frontal control to regulate craving
Implicit cognitive processes in psychopathology( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Evaluating implicit drinking identity as a mediator of drinking motives and alcohol consumption and craving( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Introduction: Implicit drinking identity (i.e., cognitive associations between the self and drinking) is a reliable predictor of drinking. However, whether implicit drinking identity might mediate the relationship between other robust predictors of drinking and drinking outcomes is unknown. We hypothesized that implicit drinking would mediate the relationship between drinking motives and alcohol consumption and craving. Method: We assessed drinking motives at Time 1, implicit drinking identity at Time 2 (on average, 11 days later) and self-reported alcohol consumption and craving at Time 3 (on average, 6 days later) in a sample of 194 US undergraduates (54% women) who reported at least one heavy drinking episode (4 drinks for women, 5 for men) in the past month. Participants completed self-report measures of drinking motives, daily alcohol consumption, and current craving. Results: Implicit drinking identity uniquely mediated the relationship between social motives and alcohol consumption. It did not, however, mediate the relationship between motives and craving. Time 2 implicit drinking identity was positively associated with greater alcohol consumption and craving at Time 3, even after controlling for drinking motives. Subsequent analyses indicated significant indirect effects between social, enhancement, and coping motives (but not conformity) and consumption and craving when each motive was evaluated individually. Conclusions: Implicit drinking identity continues to have promise as a predictor of drinking outcomes and as a target for interventions. Future experimental and prospective studies will be critical to establish the circumstances under which implicit drinking identity is strengthened and/or activated and the resulting effects on hazardous drinking. Highlights: Does implicit drinking identity mediate between drinking motives and drinking? We tested this in a short-term prospective study of US undergraduates. Drinking identity uniquely mediated between social motives and consumption. Indirect effects were found for three motives when tested individually. Drinking identity is a robust predictor and a potential intervention target
Alcohol Cognitive Bias Modification training for problem drinkers over the web( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Following successful outcomes of cognitive bias modification (CBM) programs for alcoholism in clinical and community samples, the present study investigated whether different varieties of CBM (attention control training and approach-bias re-training) could be delivered successfully in a fully automated web-based way and whether these interventions would help self-selected problem drinkers to reduce their drinking. Participants were recruited through online advertising, which resulted in 697 interested participants, of whom 615 were screened in. Of the 314 who initiated training, 136 completed a pretest, four sessions of computerized training and a posttest. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions (attention control or one of three varieties of approach-bias re-training) or a sham-training control condition. The general pattern of findings was that participants in all conditions (including participants in the control-training condition) reduced their drinking. It is suggested that integrating CBM with online cognitive and motivational interventions could improve results. Highlights: First web-based test of different varieties of cognitive training in problem drinkers As usual in internet research large dropout (half after inclusion, another half during training) Drinking went down in all conditions, including sham-training control Combinations of motivational intervention and cognitive training should be studied
A Test of Multisession Automatic Action Tendency Retraining to Reduce Alcohol Consumption Among Young Adults in the Context of a Human Laboratory Paradigm( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: Young adult heavy drinking is an important public health concern. Current interventions have efficacy but with only modest effects, and thus, novel interventions are needed. In prior studies, heavy drinkers, including young adults, have demonstrated stronger automatically triggered approach tendencies to alcohol‐related stimuli than lighter drinkers. Automatic action tendency retraining has been developed to correct this tendency and consequently reduce alcohol consumption. This study is the first to test multiple iterations of automatic action tendency retraining, followed by laboratory alcohol self‐administration. Methods: A total of 72 nontreatment‐seeking, heavy drinking young adults ages 21 to 25 were randomized to automatic action tendency retraining or a control condition (i.e., "sham training"). Of these, 69 (54% male) completed 4 iterations of retraining or the control condition over 5days with an alcohol drinking session on Day 5. Self‐administration was conducted according to a human laboratory paradigm designed to model individual differences in impaired control (i.e., difficulty adhering to limits on alcohol consumption). Results: Automatic action tendency retraining was not associated with greater reduction in alcohol approach tendency or less alcohol self‐administration than the control condition. The laboratory paradigm was probably sufficiently sensitive to detect an effect of an experimental manipulation given the range of self‐administration behavior observed, both in terms of number of alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks and measures of drinking topography. Conclusions: Automatic action tendency retraining was ineffective among heavy drinking young adults without motivation to change their drinking. Details of the retraining procedure may have contributed to the lack of a significant effect. Despite null primary findings, the impaired control laboratory paradigm is a valid laboratory‐based measure of young adult alcohol consumption that provides the opportunity to observe drinking topography and self‐administration of nonalcoholic beverages (i.e., protective behavioral strategies directly related to alcohol use). Abstract : Automatic action tendency retraining was not associated with greater reduction in alcohol approach tendency or less alcohol self‐administration than the control condition among heavy drinking young adults. This figure shows the primary, blood alcohol concentration (BAC)‐related outcomes. On the left, peak estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) during a 3‐hour ad‐libitum ‐drinking period in the retraining and control conditions. On the right, peak actual breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) obtained after the end of the ad‐libitum ‐drinking period in the retraining and control conditions
 
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Handbook of implicit cognition and addiction
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Alternative Names
Wiers, Reinout W. 1966-

Wiers, Reinout W. (Reinout Willem Henry Jon), 1966-

Wiers, Reinout Willem Henry Jon

Wiers, Reinout Willem Henry Jon 1966-

Languages
English (37)

Dutch (10)