WorldCat Identities

Baerman, Matthew

Overview
Works: 19 works in 108 publications in 2 languages and 1,520 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Matthew Baerman
The syntax-morphology interface : a study of syncretism by Matthew Baerman( Book )

23 editions published between 2005 and 2010 in English and held by 376 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book provides the first full-length study of inflectional syncretism, presenting a typology of its occurrence across a wide range of languages. The implications of syncretism for the syntax-morphology interface have long been recognized: it argues either for an enriched model of feature structure (thereby preserving a direct link between function and form), or for the independence of morphological structure from syntactic structure. The Syntax-Morphology Interface presents a compelling argument for the autonomy of morphology, and the resulting analysis is illustrated in a series of formal case studies within Network Morphology. It will be welcomed by all linguists interested in the relation between words and the larger units of which they are a part."--Jacket
Deponency and morphological mismatches( Book )

12 editions published between 2000 and 2007 in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Throughout this collection of essays leading linguists on the theory and typology of mismatches between syntax and morphology establish the important role that research on deponency has to play in linguistics, and set the standard for future work
Defective paradigms : missing forms and what they tell us( Book )

10 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 219 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"An important design feature of language is the use of productive patterns in inflection. In English, we have pairs such as ènjoy' ̃ènjoyed', àgree' ̃àgreed', and many others. On the basis of this productive pattern, if we meet a new verb t̀ransduce' we know that there will be the form t̀ransduced'. Even if the pattern is not fully regular, there will be a form available, as in ùnderstand' ̃ùnderstood'. Surprisingly, this principle is sometimes violated, a phenomenon known as defectiveness, which means there is a gap in a word's set of forms: for example, given the verb f̀orego', many if not most people are unwilling to produce a past tense." "Although such gaps have been known to us since the days of Classical grammarians, they remain poorly understood. Defectiveness contradicts basic assumptions about the way inflectional rules operate, because it seems to require that speakers know that for certain words, not only should one not employ the expected rule, one should not employ any rule at all. This is a serious problem, since it is probably safe to say that all reigning models of grammar were designed as if defectiveness did not exist, and would lose a considerable amount of their elegance if it were properly factored in." "This volume addresses these issues from a number of analytical approaches---historical, statistical and theoretical---and by using studies from a range of languages." "Since 1905 this series has provided a unique record of British scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, by publishing the highly regarded Academy lectures, and through its memoirs of the lives and scholarly achievements of recently deceased Fellows of the Academy." "The series includes thematic volumes that stem from symposia specially convened to address particular subjects."--Jacket
Morphological complexity by Matthew Baerman( Book )

13 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Inflectional morphology plays a paradoxical role in language. On the one hand it tells us useful things, for example that a noun is plural or a verb is in the past tense. On the other hand many languages get along perfectly well without it, so the baroquely ornamented forms we sometimes find come across as a gratuitous over-elaboration. This is especially apparent where the morphological structures operate at cross purposes to the general systems of meaning and function that govern a language, yielding inflection classes and arbitrarily configured paradigms. This is what we call morphological complexity. Manipulating the forms of words requires learning a whole new system of structures and relationships. This book confronts the typological challenge of characterising the wildly diverse sorts of morphological complexity we find in the languages of the world, offering both a unified descriptive framework and quantitative measures that can be applied to such heterogeneous systems
Understanding and measuring morphological complexity( Book )

14 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This work aims to assess the nature of morphological complexity, and the properties that distinguish it from the complexity manifested in other components of language. Chapters highlight novel perspectives on conceptualizing morphological complexity, and offer concrete means for measuring, quantifying and analysing it
The Oxford handbook of inflection( Book )

15 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in English and German and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the latest addition to a group of handbooks covering the field of morphology, alongside 'The Oxford Handbook of Case' (2008), 'The Oxford Handbook of Compounding' (2009), and 'The Oxford Handbook of Derivational Morphology' (2014). It provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art overview of work on inflection - the expression of grammatical information through changes in word forms. The volume's 24 chapters are written by experts in the field from a variety of theoretical backgrounds, with examples drawn from a wide range of languages. The first part of the handbook covers the fundamental building blocks of inflectional form and content: morphemes, features, and means of exponence. Part two focuses on what is arguably the most characteristic property of inflectional systems, paradigmatic structure, and the non-trivial nature of the mapping between function and form. The third part deals with change and variation over time, and the fourth part covers computational issues from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Part 5 addresses psycholinguistic questions relating to language acquisition and neurocognitive disorders. The final part is devoted to sketches of individual inflectional systems, illustrating a range of typological possibilities across a genetically diverse set of languages from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Australia, Europe, and South America --
The evolution of fixed stress in Slavic by Matthew Baerman( Book )

7 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Free to fixed stress in Slavic by Matthew Baerman( )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The common ancestor of the Slavic language had a complex system of free stress, correlated both with lexical and inflectional oppositions. This has been lost in several of the contemporary languages, where stress is instead fixed with respect to the beginning or the end of the word. This dissertation explores the rise of fixed stress, employing Optimality Theory for the formal analysis. Although there is no direct evidence of the transition from free to fixed stress as a historical process, it is still reflected in some areas as a dialect continuum; in this study synchronic dialect geography is used to reconstruct diachrony
The Syntax-Morphology Interface : a Study of Syncretism. Cambridge Studies in Linguistics, The: 109( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Syncretism - where a single form serves two or more morphosyntactic functions - is a persistent problem at the syntax-morphology interface. It results from a 'mismatch', whereby the syntax of a language makes a particular distinction, but the morphology does not. This pioneering book provides the first full-length study of inflectional syncretism, presenting a typology of its occurrence across a wide range of languages. The implications of syncretism for the syntax-morphology interface have long been recognised: it argues either for an enriched model of feature structure (thereby preserving a direct link between function and form), or for the independence of morphological structure from syntactic structure. The Syntax-Morphology Interface argues for the autonomy of morphology, and the resulting analysis is illustrated in a series of formal case studies within network morphology. It will be welcomed by all linguists interested in the relation between words and the larger units of which they are a part
The evolution of fixed stress in Slavic by Matthew Baerman( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The location of deponency by Matthew Baerman( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Wohnkonzepte in Japan Typologien für den kleinen Raum by Christian Schittich( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In den dichtbesiedelten Ballungszentren Japans entstehen – auf scheinbar unbebaubaren engen Flächen – kleine Häuser mit ungewöhnlichen Raumkonzepten und überraschenden Grundrisslösungen. Aber nicht nur dieses Gespür für Raum, auch der sinnliche Umgang mit Materialien, das Gefühl für Ästhetik und die gekonnte Verbindung mit traditionellen Elementen fasziniert Architekten außerhalb Japans. Dass die meisten konstruktiven Lösungen dabei nicht den mitteleuropäischen Standards entsprechen, ist sekundär: Es sind die innovativen Ansätze, die als Inspirationsquelle dienen. Dieser Band stellt die aktuellsten Wohnprojekte aus den letzten Jahren vor: Neben großzügigen Bildstrecken und Grundrissdarstellungen werden zudem ausgewählte Detaillösungen vorgestellt, die für unsere Normen adaptierbar sind
Case syncretism in and out of Indo-European( )

1 edition published in 2001 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Typology and the formal modelling of syncretism( )

1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Proceedings of the British Academy. missing forms and what they tell us( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The stem in inflectional verbal paradigms in Maltese by Maris Camilleri( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Domains of syncretism: a demonstration of the autonomy of morphology( )

1 edition published in 2001 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Linguistic typology morhpology by Matthew Baerman( )

1 edition published in 2007 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Proceedings of the British Academy( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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The syntax-morphology interface : a study of syncretism
Covers
Deponency and morphological mismatchesDefective paradigms : missing forms and what they tell usProceedings of the British Academy. missing forms and what they tell usProceedings of the British Academy
Languages
English (101)

German (3)