WorldCat Identities

Umphrey, Martha Merrill

Overview
Works: 41 works in 199 publications in 1 language and 22,426 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Editor, Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Martha Merrill Umphrey
Imagining new legalities : privacy and its possibilities in the 21st century by Austin Sarat( )

10 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 1,782 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

La 4e de couverture indique : "Imagining New Legalities reminds us that examining the right to privacy and the public/private distinction is an important way of mapping the forms and limits of power that can legitimately be exercised by collective bodies over individuals and by governments over their citizens. This book does not seek to provide a comprehensive overview of threats to privacy and rejoinders to them. Instead it considers several different conceptions of privacy and provides examples of legal inventiveness in confronting some contemporary challenges to the public/private distinction. It provides a context for that consideration by surveying the meanings of privacy in three domains--the first, involving intimacy and intimate relations; the second, implicating criminal procedure, in particular, the 4th amendment; and the third, addressing control of information in the digital age. The first two provide examples of what are taken to be classic breaches of the public/private distinction, namely instances when government intrudes in an area claimed to be private. The third has to do with voluntary circulation of information and the question of who gets to control what happens to and with that information."
Law without nations by Austin Sarat( )

10 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,757 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The possibility of law in the absence of a nation would seem to strip law from its source of meaning and value. At the same time, law divorced from nations would clear the ground for a cosmopolitan vision in which the prejudices or idiosyncrasies of distinctive national traditions would give way to more universalist groundings for law. These alternately dystopian and utopian viewpoints inspire this original collection of essays on law without nations. This book examines the ways in which the growing internationalization of law affects domestic national law, the relationship between cosmopolita
Law on the screen( )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 1,717 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Essays originally presented at a conference entitled Law's Moving Image, held April 11-12, 2003, at Amherst College
The place of law( )

15 editions published between 2003 and 2006 in English and held by 1,677 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The essays in The Place of Law speak to the role of place in our understanding of law. The contributors treat place as more than geographical fact - calling attention to the ways in which localized cultures are expressed in legal norms, inquiring about new spaces within which legal authority is being deployed, and examining the interactions between law and the process of globalization
Lives in the law( )

11 editions published between 2002 and 2006 in English and held by 1,665 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The essays look at the consequences that legal practice has on the lives of its practitioners as well as on the individual legal subject and on the shape of shared identities. These essays challenge liberal and communitarian notions of what it means to live the law. In the first of the essays, Pnina Lahav presents a study of the Chicago Seven Trial to paint a picture of the law's power to serve as a site for the definition of a collective group identity. In contrast, Sarah Gordon focuses on the experience of an individual legal subject, namely, the defendant in the Hester Vaughn trial, a notorious nineteenth-century case of infanticide. Frank Munger looks at how law constructs the identity of women and explores the strategies by which poor women resist the law's construction of their dependency. In the fourth essay, Vicki Schultz offers a moral vision of equality that straddles the liberal and communitarian positions with her articulation of the concept of a "life's work." Lastly, Annette Wieviorka examines the recent trial of Maurice Papon for complicity in crimes against humanity to reveal how the very identity of a nation--in this case, France--can be defined through juridical and legal acts. Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science and Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, Amherst College. Lawrence Douglas is Associate Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, Amherst College. Martha Umphrey is Assistant Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, Amherst College
Law's madness( )

12 editions published between 2003 and 2006 in English and held by 1,659 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Law and madness? Madness, it seems, exists outside the law and, in principle, society struggles to keep these slippery terms separate. From this perspective, madness appears to be law's foil, the chaos that escapes law's control and simultaneously justifies its existence. Law's Madness explores the gray area between the realms of reason and madness. The distinguished contributors to Law's Madness propose a fascinating interdisciplinary approach to the instability and mutual permeability of law and madness. Their essays examine a variety of discursive forms-from the literary to the historical to the psychoanalytic-in which law is driven more by narrative than by reason. Their studies delineate the ways in which the law takes its definition in part from that which it excludes, suppresses, or excises from itself, illuminating the drive to enforce barriers between non-reason and legality, while simultaneously shedding new light on the constitutive force of the irrational in legal doctrine. Law's Madness suggests that the tense and paradoxical relationship between law and madness is precisely what erects and sustains law. This provocative collection asks what must be forgotten in order to uphold the rule of law. Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College. Lawrence Douglas is Associate Professor of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought at Amherst College. Martha Merrill Umphrey is Associate Professor of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought at Amherst College
Law and the stranger( )

11 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,633 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The essays contained in this book were originally prepared for and presented as a seminar series at Amherst College."--Acknowledgments
The secrets of law by Austin Sarat( )

9 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 1,603 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Explores the ways law both traffics in and regulates secrecy. Taking a close look at the opacity built into legal and governance processes, it explores the ways law produces zones of secrecy, the relation between secrecy and justice, and how we understand the inscrutability of law's processes. The first half of the work examines the role of secrecy in contemporary political and legal practices-including the question of transparency in democratic processes during the Bush Administration, the principle of public justice in England's response to the war on terror, and the evidentiary law of spousal privilege. The second half of the book explores legal, literary, and filmic representations of secrets in law, focusing on how knowledge about particular cases and crimes is often rendered opaque to those attempting to access and decode the information. Those invested in transparency must ultimately cultivate a capacity to read between the lines, decode the illegible, and acknowledge both the virtues and dangers of the unknowable"--Page 4 of cover
Law and war( )

8 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,516 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Law and War explores the cultural, historical, spatial, and theoretical dimensions of the relationship between law and war - a connection that has long vexed the jurisprudential imagination. Historically the term 'war crime' struck some as redundant and others as oxymoronic: redundant because war itself is criminal; oxymoronic because war submits to no law. More recently, the remarkable trend toward the juridification of warfare has emerged, as law has sought to stretch its dominion over every aspect of the waging of armed struggle. No longer simply a tool for judging battlefield conduct, law now seeks to subdue warfare and to enlist it into the service of legal goals. Law has emerged as a force that stands over and above war, endowed with the power to authorize and restrain, to declare and limit, to justify and condemn. In examining this fraught, contested, and evolving relationship, Law and War investigates such questions as: What can efforts to subsume war under the logic of law teach us about the aspirations and limits of law? How have paradigms of law and war changed as a result of the contact with new forms of struggle? How has globalization and continuing practices of occupation reframed the relationship between law and war?"--Unedited summary from book cover
Law as punishment/law as regulation( )

8 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,430 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Law depends on various modes of classification. How an act or a person is classified may be crucial in determining the rights obtained, the procedures employed, and what understandings get attached to the act or person. Critiques of law often reveal how arbitrary its classificatory acts are, but no one doubts their power and consequence. This crucial new book considers the problem of law's physical control of persons and the ways in which this control illuminates competing visions of the law: as both a tool of regulation and an instrument of coercion or punishment. It examines various instances of punishment and regulation to illustrate points of overlap and difference between them, and captures the lived experience of the state's enterprise of subjecting human conduct to the governance of rules. Ultimately, the essays call into question the adequacy of a view of punishment and/or regulation that neglects the perspectives of those who are at the receiving end of these exercises of state power"--Provided by publisher
Reimagining To kill a mockingbird : family, community, and the possibility of equal justice under law by Austin Sarat( )

9 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1,052 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fifty years after the release of the film version of Harper Lee s acclaimed novel To Kill a Mockingbird, this collection of original essays takes a fresh look at a classic text in legal scholarship. The contributors revisit and examine Atticus, Scout, and Jem Finch, their community, and the events that occur there through the interdisciplinary lens of law and humanities scholarship. The readings in this volume peel back the film s visual representation of the many-layered social world of Maycomb, Alabama, offering sometimes counterintuitive insights through the prism of a number of provocative contemporary theoretical and interpretive questions. What, they ask, is the relationship between the subversion of social norms and the doing of justice or injustice? Through what narrative and visual devices are some social hierarchies destabilized while others remain hegemonic? How should we understand the sacrifices characters make in the name of justice, and comprehend their failures in achieving it? Asking such questions casts light on the film s eccentricities and internal contradictions and suggests the possibility of new interpretations of a culturally iconic text. The book examines the context that gave meaning to the film s representation of race and how debates about family, community, and race are played out and reframed in law
Law and the utopian imagination( )

4 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 844 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Law and the Utopian Imagination seeks to explore and resuscitate the notion of utopianism within current legal discourse. The idea of utopia has fascinated the imaginations of important thinkers for ages. And yet - who writes seriously on the idea of utopia today? The mid-century critique appears to have carried the day, and a belief in the very possibility of utopian achievements appears to have flagged in the face of a world marked by political instability, social upheaval, and dreary market realities. Instead of mapping out the contours of a familiar terrain, this book seeks to explore the possibilities of a productive engagement between the utopian and the legal imagination. The book asks: Is it possible to re-imagine or revitalize the concept of utopia such that it can survive the terms of the mid-century liberal critique? Alternatively, is it possible to re-imagine the concept of utopia and the theory of liberal legality so as to dissolve the apparent antagonism between the two? In charting possible answers to these questions, the present volume hopes to revive interest in a vital topic of inquiry too long neglected by both social thinkers and legal scholars"--Unedited summary from book cover
Law's mistakes by Austin Sarat( )

7 editions published in 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 831 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From false convictions to botched executions, from erroneous admission of evidence in a criminal trial to misunderstandings that arise in the process of creating contracts, law is awash in mistakes. The essays in Law's Mistakes explore what law recognizes as errors and the way it responds to them. They identify the jurisprudential and political perspectives that underlie different understandings of what is or is not a legal mistake, and examine the fraught, contested, and evolving relationship between law and error. In addition, they offer templates for thinking about what mistakes can tell us about the aspirations and limits of law, and for understanding how our imagining of law is enabled and shaped by its juxtaposition to a condition labeled 'mistake'"--Unedited summary from book cover
Law and mourning( )

5 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 695 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"[This book] brings together a distinguished group of scholars to explore the many and complex ways that law both regulates and gives meaning to our experience of loss. The essays in this volume illuminate how law helps us to absorb and contend with loss and its reverberations, channeling the powerful emotions associated with death and protecting those vulnerable to them. At the same time, law creates a regulatory framework for death as it establishes the necessity for a clear demarcation of the boundary between life and death, defines what we can and cannot do with the remains of the dead, and creates both privileges and disabilities for survivors. The contributors to the volume also explore how mourning generates critiques of existing legal and political orders which seem compelled by calls from the dead, unleashing an indifference to legal consequences in survivors that can undermine or destroy law." -- Publisher's website
Subjects of responsibility : framing personhood in modern bureaucracies( )

9 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 637 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bringing together the work of scholars in anthropology, law, literary studies, philosophy, and political theory, the essays in this volume show how state and private bureaucracies play crucial roles in fashioning forms of responsibility, which they then enjoin on populations
The limits of law( Book )

5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 372 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Essays examine the different meanings of the limits of law: descriptive, normative, and constitutive. They take as their focus law's relationship to "transitional moments and spectral spaces"--acts of terror, states of emergency, gestures of surrender, offers of amnesty, payment of reparation, and invocations of retroactivity. They show how law is generated and changed through contact with conditions at the edges of legal theory
Law and the sacred( Book )

8 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 371 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The essays in this book were originally prepared for ... during the 2001-2002 academic year."--Acknowledgments
Law as Punishment by Austin Sarat( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 340 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Law depends on various modes of classification. How an act or a person is classified may be crucial in determining the rights obtained, the procedures employed, and what understandings get attached to the act or person. Critiques of law often reveal how arbitrary its classificatory acts are, but no one doubts their power and consequence. This crucial new book considers the problem of law's physical control of persons and the ways in which this control illuminates competing visions of the law: as both a tool of regulation and an instrument of coercion or punishment. It examines various instance
Law and catastrophe( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 289 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The essays in this book were ... presented as a seminar series at Amherst College during the 2003-2004 academic year ... financial support provided by the College's Charles Hamilton Houston Forum on Law and Social Change."--Page [vii]
How law knows( Book )

5 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 252 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The chapters in this book were originally prepared ... during the 2004-2005 academic year."--Acknowledgments
 
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Law and the stranger
Covers
Law on the screenThe place of lawLives in the lawLaw's madnessLaw and the strangerLaw as punishment/law as regulationSubjects of responsibility : framing personhood in modern bureaucraciesThe limits of law
Alternative Names
Merrill, Martha Umphrey

Merrill Umphrey, Martha

Umphrey, Martha.

Umphrey, Martha M.

Umphrey, Martha Merrill

Languages
English (156)