WorldCat Identities

Norwood Press

Overview
Works: 423 works in 864 publications in 1 language and 33,745 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  History  Juvenile works  Action and adventure fiction  Allegories  Sea stories  Western fiction  Fantasy fiction  Biography  Sea fiction 
Roles: Printer, Book producer, Publisher
Classifications: PS3523.O46, 813.52
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Norwood Press
Child life in colonial days by Alice Morse Earle( Book )

1 edition published in 1899 in English and held by 717 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the end of the 19th century, after Americans had endured thirty years of tremendous change due to rapid industrial growth, social upheavals, and the excesses of the Gilded Age, they began to look back with increasing fondness to their own past. The Colonial Revival in architecture was one fruit of this nostalgia; another was the insightful chronicles of social history in earlier days written by Alice Morse Earle. Following the success of her book Home Life in Colonial Days, Alice Morse Earle wrote a detailed and fascinating account of American children and their lives from the very earliest settlers to the first decades of the new republic. Covering everything from dress to toys, schools to play, discipline and religion, she described in highly readable prose a child's life in the days before the railroad and telegraph. Her book has endured for a century, enthralling readers and inspiring scholars to new research into the field
Mr. Crewe's career by Winston Churchill( Book )

2 editions published in 1908 in English and held by 638 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Think that the problem of large corporations exercising undue influence in the political sphere is a recent phenomenon? If so, think again. Mr. Crewe's Career, an eye-opening historical novel set in the early twentieth century, follows the efforts of the railroad industry to steamroll its way into state politics in New Hampshire
Stage-coach and tavern days by Alice Morse Earle( Book )

2 editions published in 1900 in English and held by 613 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author reconstructs the life of the traveler in colonial times. He examines the inn, the packhorse and conestoga wagon, and the early stage coaches
The crossing by Winston Churchill( Book )

2 editions published in 1904 in English and held by 577 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Time of George Rogers Clark's military achievements in the West and Daniel Boone's wilderness road
Social life at Rome in the age of Cicero by W. Warde Fowler( Book )

1 edition published in 1909 in English and held by 502 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
The sea wolf by Jack London( Book )

8 editions published between 1904 and 1908 in English and held by 500 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Life of a Norwegian sealing schooner and a grim picture of a sailor who is a combination of savage and superman
The Virginian : a horseman of the plains by Owen Wister( Book )

4 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 485 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Set in the vast Wyoming territory, this masterpiece helped establish the code of the West and its stereotypical characters. The novel also features the first known "shootout" in American literature
Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall by Charles Major( )

5 editions published between 1902 and 1911 in English and held by 478 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National Theatre, direction W.H. Rapley, business management W.H. Fowler. Mary Pickford in "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall," from the romantic novel by Charles Major, adapted by Waldemar Young, a Marshall Neilan production, photography by Charles Rosher, art direction by Harold Grieve, Anton F. Grot, Irvin J. Martin, Harry Oliver and H.W. Miles, costumes by Mitchel Leisen, Miss Picford's costumes by Sophie Wachner and Leisen, electrical effects by William S. Johnson, musical score by Victor Schertzinger, released by United Artists Corporation
Fanny Burney (Madame d'Arblay) by Austin Dobson( Book )

1 edition published in 1903 in English and held by 469 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When God laughs and other stories by Jack London( )

4 editions published in 1911 in English and held by 466 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jack London (January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916), was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and other books. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first Americans to make a huge financial success from writing. The Scarlet Plague was written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912. It was re-released in February of 2007 by Echo Library. The story takes place in 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few people left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons. American society at the time of the plague has become severely stratified and there is a large hereditary underclass of servants and "nurses"; and the politcal system has been replaced by a formalized oligarchy. Commercial airship lines exist, as do some airships privately owned by the very rich
The mettle of the pasture by James Lane Allen( Book )

5 editions published between 1903 and 1968 in English and held by 454 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Though James Lane Allen's The Mettle of the Pasture is rife with the lush descriptions and strong sense of place that imbue his previous works, the central focus of this novel is on the complicated nuances of the blossoming love between protagonists Isabel and Rowan, proving that Allen is as skilled in creating unforgettable characters and dramatic tension as he is at depicting the contours of the natural landscape
White fang by Jack London( Book )

5 editions published between 1906 and 1913 in English and held by 418 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The adventures in the northern wilderness of a dog who is part wolf and how he comes to make his peace with man
The choir invisible by James Lane Allen( Book )

3 editions published between 1897 and 1900 in English and held by 412 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Choir Invisible by James Lane Allen, appeared in 1897, and is one of his most popular and pleasing stories. It was enlarged from an earlier story called 'John Gray.' Its scene is the Kentucky of a hundred years ago. The hero is John Gray, a schoolmaster and idealist, who, disappointed in his love for Amy Falconer, a pert, pretty, shallow flirt, gradually comes to care for Mrs. Falconer, her aunt, a noble woman in reduced circumstances, who with her husband has left a former stately home in Virginia and come to live in the Kentucky wilderness. She loves him in return with a deep, tender passion that has in it something of the motherly instinct of protection; but, her husband being alive, she conceals her feeling from Gray until after he has departed from Lexington and settled in another State. She then writes him to say she is free--and he replies that he is married. But he tells her in a final letter that she has remained his ideal and guiding star to noble action. The romantic atmosphere and the ideal cast of these two leading characters make the fiction very attractive; and the fresh picturesque descriptions of pioneer life in Kentucky give the tale historical value"--Bartleby.com
The last American frontier by Frederic L Paxson( Book )

1 edition published in 1910 in English and held by 410 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The History of the American West Collection is a unique project that provides opportunities for researchers and new readers to easily access and explore works which have previously only been available on library shelves. The Collection brings to life pre-1923 titles focusing on a wide range of topics and experiences in US Western history. From the initial westward migration, to exploration and development of the American West to daily life in the West and intimate pictures of the people who inhabited it, this collection offers American West enthusiasts a new glimpse at some forgotten treasures of American culture. Encompassing genres such as poetry, fiction, nonfiction, tourist guides, biographies and drama, this collection provides a new window to the legend and realities of the American West
Historic silver of the Colonies and its makers by Francis Hill Bigelow( Book )

3 editions published in 1917 in English and held by 409 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lady Baltimore by Owen Wister( Book )

2 editions published in 1906 in English and held by 409 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The classic novel of post-Civil War Charleston life, a portrayal of the process of healing the wounds of war through reconciliation between Northerners and Southerners on a personal, not political, level. Set in the early 1900s, there are extended discussions between a Northerner and several Southerners
The game by Jack London( Book )

5 editions published between 1905 and 1912 in English and held by 399 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On the eve of their wedding, twenty-year-old Jack Fleming arranges a secret ringside seat for his sweetheart to view her only rival: the "game." Through Genevieve's apprehensive eyes, we watch the prizefight that pits her fair young lover, "the Pride of West Oakland," against the savage and brutish John Ponta and that reveals as much about her own nature, and Joe's, as it does about the force that drives the two men in their violent, fateful encounter. Responding to a review that took him to task for his realism, Jack London wrote, "I have had these experiences and it was out of these experiences, plus a fairly intimate knowledge of prize-fighting in general, that I wrote The Game." With this intimate realism, London took boxing out of the realm of disreputable topics and set it on a respectable literary course that extends from A.J. Liebling to Ernest Hemingway to Joyce Carol Oates. The familiarity of London's boxing writing testifies to its profound influence on later literary commentators on the sport, while the story The Game tells remains one of the most powerful and evocative portraits ever given of prizefighters in the grip of their passion
John Greenleaf Whittier by Thomas Wentworth Higginson( Book )

1 edition published in 1902 in English and held by 365 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the distinguished English Men of Letters" series comes this biography of Quaker author and activist John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892). A member of nineteenth century New England's family-friendly Fireside Poets School, Whittier was frequently mobbed for his outspoken antislavery beliefs. Written by a fellow abolitionist, this 1902 life story is a wealth of anecdote and reminiscence from Whittier's boyhood to his death
Before Adam by Jack London( Book )

4 editions published between 1907 and 1917 in English and held by 361 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A young man in modern America is terrorized by visions of an earlier, primitive life. Across the enormous chasm of thousands of centuries, his consciousness has become entwined with that of humanity."--Back cover
Burning Daylight by Jack London( Book )

2 editions published in 1910 in English and held by 346 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An action-filled story of the Yukon Territory in 1893, the surging novel of the men who gambled their lives and opened the vast Canadian North in their lust for gold, Burning Daylight was Jack London's best selling book during his lifetime
 
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Audience level: 0.28 (from 0.11 for Lady Balti ... to 0.71 for Specimen b ...)

WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Child life in colonial days
Covers
The sea wolf
Alternative Names
Languages
English (63)