WorldCat Identities

Shaw, Harold M. 1877-1926

Overview
Works: 13 works in 24 publications in 2 languages and 996 library holdings
Genres: Short films  Silent films  History  Internet videos  Drama  Documentary films  Historical films  Propaganda films  Actualities (Motion pictures)  Academic theses 
Roles: Director, Attributed name, Actor, Author, Producer, Adapter
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Harold M Shaw
Edison : the invention of the movies( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 659 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Commercial motion pictures were invented at the Edison Laboratory between 1888 and 1893. Perhaps none of the component parts were strictly new, but the ability of Edison and his staff to reorganize them for a specific purpose was an extraordinary cultural achievement. In 1894, Edison was the sole producer of motion pictures in the world. Many Edison films continue to be impressive as the company employed such accomplished early directors as John Collins and Alan Crosland
De Voortrekkers( Visual )

9 editions published between 1916 and 2014 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

White version of the Great Trek of the Boer people across South Africa - actually, the invasion of Zulu land. This silent film shows the villainy and treachery of the Zulus and the heroism of the whites. But in its renegade Zulu character Sobuza (played by the actor Goba), who aids the whites, it may have created the first African film-star. Directed by Harold Shaw
Treasures III : social issues in American film, 1900-1934( Visual )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The third program in a series of 48 movies that helped change America. During the first decades of the 20th century no issue was too controversial for movies ... from prohibition to abortion, unions, atheism, the vote for women, worker safety, juvenile justice, homelessness and immigration, these films became the catalyst for social change
Thirty days at hard labor( Visual )

1 edition published in 1912 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At Bear Track Gulch( Visual )

1 edition published in 1913 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Edison : the invention of the movies( Visual )

1 edition published in 1918 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two hours of interviews with archivists and early cinema scholars. Over two hundred scans of artifacts from MoMA's Edison Collection never available to the public before: stills, script fragments, interoffice memos, and promotions. 140 complete films
Edison: The Invention Of The Movies by Thomas A Edison( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Commercial motion pictures were invented at the Edison Laboratory between 1888 and 1893. Perhaps none of the component parts were strictly new, but the ability of Edison and his staff to reorganize them for a specific purpose was an extraordinary cultural achievement. In 1894, Edison was the sole producer of motion pictures in the world. Many Edison films continue to be impressive as the company employed such accomplished early directors as John Collins and Alan Crosland
Program 4( Visual )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Die voortrekkers (het winnen van een nieuw werelddeel) : groot Hollandsch-Zuid-Afrikaansch aanschouwelijk drama by Harold M Shaw( Book )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The rose of Rhodesia( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The crime of carelessness( Visual )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"A response to possibly the worst tragedy, or crime, in American labor history: the March 1911 fire at the Triangle Waist Company, in which 146 workers died, mostly girls and women in their teens and early twenties. Not until 9/11 would there be a deadlier workplace disaster in New York City. The Triangle plant, located in a 10-story building just off Washington Square in Greenwich Village, was a relatively modern garment factory, specializing in 'waists, ' or shirtwaists (the woman's blouse that, worn with a skirt, had liberated fashion since the 1890s). The company had been in the news in 1909 for its two owners' unyielding resistance to demands, including for improved working conditions, made in the shirtwaist workers strike, known in labor history as the 'Uprising of the Twenty Thousand, ' and notable for its young immigrant female leaders. Investigations after the Triangle fire revealed extraordinary safety failures, including at least one locked exit door and a fire escape that collapsed under the weight of fleeing workers. The public outrage was reflected in the 100,000 who walked to the funeral, on a drizzly day, amid the black umbrellas of 250,000 additional spectators. The seven unidentified victims were laid to rest with services in three faiths: Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish. It was, The New York American reported, one of the 'most impressive spectacles of sorrow New York has ever known.' There was a scramble to fix responsibility. 'Blame shifted to all sides for fire horror, ' ran a New York times front-page headline. Alongside city and state commissions came this fiction-film response from the National Association of Manufacturers, a trade lobby founded in 1895 and still active today. In 1912, when The crime of carelessness was released, the Association represented some 4,000 manufacturers and was relentless in its antiunion 'open shop' crusades. The film, a collaboration with the Edison company, was provided for screening at no charge except for shipping, along with other titles in which the Association had a hand (including An American in the making, on disc 4). According to the Association's brochure, its films were shown 'in fully 7,500 theatres all over the country' and 'have been particularly effective in bringing home useful lessons.' Lecturers sent out by the Association would often accompany the films to reinforce the 'industrial betterment' philosophy behind them: 'Without complete and cordial co-operation on the part of employer and employee, the prevention of industrial accidents is impossible, [and] the elimination of fire waste is impracticable.' The crime of carelessness tells the story of a workplace fire at a textile mill without reference to any specific company or city, but the parallels with, and rewritings of, the Triangle situation are striking. The films begins with a shot of a safety inspector warning the owner about a blocked fire door, and apparently not writing up the violation, after which the story centers on a couple at the mill who are planning their marriage, Hilda (Mabel Trunnell) and Tom (Barry O'Moore, known as Herbert Yost when he began his film career under D.W. Griffith at Biograph). Tom is a chain smoker, who ignores both Hilda's admonitions and a reprimand from the owner, who points out the 'positively no smoking' sign. There are fair parallels here with the situation at Triangle, where no-smoking signs were posted on every floor in English, Italian, and Yiddish. The policy was often ignored by the more privileged 'cutters' (generally men, who were responsible for making accurate cuts through many layers of cloth). Investigations after the Triangle fire concluded that it probably started when a cutter tossed a match or a cigarette into a scrap bin of cotton (which can be explosively flammable), as loosely re-created in the film. Tom proves both culprit and hero, in risking his life to break through a wall when the fire exit is blocked and then in returning to the flaming building to rescue Hilda. The path he takes is unclear, but to save her, Tom has to carry Hilda down a freight elevator, which was also one of the few escape routes in the Triangle fire. The film thus apparently strives for accuracy and fair-mindedness, but with a revealing shift of emphasis, away from the owners, who in the Triangle case were vilified in the press and public rallies. The film focuses instead on the worker's carelessness, on how his thoughtless act brings unemployment, poverty, and his own near-suicidal despair. The 'crime' of the title seems primarily his. Tattered former workers shun him on the streets while Hilda, disabled from her injuries, folds away her unused wedding dress and moves with her parents to a dingy apartment, where she ekes out a living tying artificial flowers. She has a stark, symbolic vision, 'her reasoning, ' an intertitle explains, of the three representative men pointing in a round-robin of accusations, an image captioned in the National Association of Manufacturers' publicity: 'Who is responsible? The youth who disobeyed the rules, the inefficient inspector, or the owner?' In the film's happy ending, the owner has a revelation that he, too, bears some responsibility, if only after Hilda comes on crutches to confront him. He writes to Tom with a job offer: 'We are both to blame. ... I am sure we have both learned our lesson.' The chief problem with all of this 'complete and cordial co-operation' is that the true responsibility for the Triangle deaths was so clear that the film's reasonable tone comes across as self-protective spin. In the film version, everyone is to blame, which is to argue that no one really is. Missing are such features of the Triangle fire as the fire hoses with no water pressure, the exits leading only to dead ends, the filmsy fire escapes, and the overcrowded working conditions. Fires were such frequent events at textile plants that planning for them was routine. The two Triangle owners, however, had a history of planning for fires by purchasing ever larger insurance policies. They were classified in the insurance industry as 'repeaters' for having collected on previous large claims. By the time of this film, they had been acquitted of all criminal charges in the Triangle case, thanks mainly to the judge's ruling that it had to be proved that they knew the fire exit door was locked. They paid nothing to victims' heirs, despite collecting far more in insurance than actual losses. One of the owners was convicted the year following this film of knowingly locking a fire door in another factory, and fined $25. As a final indignity, in 1914, their Triangle Waist Company was caught sewing in counterfeit National Consumers' League labels, which certified that garments were 'made under clean and healthful conditions'"--Treasures III brochure notes by Scott Simmon
Hospital management engineering by Harold M Shaw( Book )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Toil and tyranny : program 3( Visual )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.31 (from 0.00 for Hospital m ... to 0.99 for The crime ...)

Alternative Names
Harold M. Shaw American film director

Harold M. Shaw Amerikaans filmregisseur (-1926)

Harold M. Shaw director de cine estadounidense

Harold M. Shaw director de cinema estatunidenc

Harold M. Shaw réalisateur américain

Harold M. Shaw regista, attore e sceneggiatore statunitense

Shaw Harold 1877-1926

هارولد شو مخرج أفلام أمريكي

Languages
English (17)

German (1)