WorldCat Identities

Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio

Overview
Works: 14 works in 51 publications in 1 language and 579 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Juvenile works  Fiction  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Editor, Author, 958, Thesis advisor
Classifications: QL737.C22, 599.77
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Claudio Sillero-Zubiri
The biology and conservation of wild canids by David W Macdonald( Book )

20 editions published between 2004 and 2010 in English and held by 294 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This work on the dog family deals with the many aspects of the biology and conservation of wolves, dogs, jackals and foxes. It covers many topics relevant to modern conservation science, and features detailed case studies of many canid species across theglobe
Canids : foxes, wolves, jackals, and dogs : status survey and conservation action plan( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The wolf watchers by Alison Hood( Book )

4 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ethiopian wolf : status survey and conservation action plan( Book )

5 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Behavioural ecology of the Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensis by Claudio Sillero-Zubiri( )

6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biology and conservation of wild felids by David W Macdonald( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The editors utilize their fifty years of combined professional experience in the behaviour and ecology of wild felids to draw together a unique network of the world's most respected and knowledgeable experts on cats large and small. For the first time, this interdisciplinary field of research is brought together within a single volume, in a compendious exploration of wild cats that are as intriguing as they are beautiful and charismatic." "Beginning with a complete account of all thirty-six felid species, there follow eight comprehensive review chapters that span all the topics most relevant to felid conservation and biology, including evolution and systematics, felid form and function, genetic applications, behavioural ecology, management of conflict with people and control of international trade in felid species, conservation tools/techniques, ex situ management, and felid diseases. Nineteen detailed case studies then delve deeply into the very best species investigations worldwide, written by leading figures in the field. These chapters portray the unique attributes of the wild felids, describe their fascinating (and conflicting) relationship with humans, and create an unparalleled platform for future research and conservation measures. A final chapter analyses the requirements of, and interdisciplinary approaches to, practical conservation with cutting-edge examples of conservation science and action with implications that go far beyond the cat family." "The wild felids provide examples that will thrill the evolutionary biologist and theoretician, enthral the natural historian, and challenge the conservation biologist and wildlife manager. Anybody interested in evolutionary and behavioural biology, in mammals, in the environment, or in conservation will find much that is new and enriching in this book. It is also an unrivalled source of information for anyone with a serious interest in cats."--Jacket
Monitoring Ethiopian wolf populations : a field manual by Scott Newey( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Canids : foxes, wolves, jackals and dogs( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Canids: foxes, wolves, jackals and dogs : status survey and conservation action plan( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simien Jackal : ecology and conservation by Dada Gottelli( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Competition and niche separation between Corsac and Red Foxes in Mongolia by James D Murdoch( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Canis simensis by Claudio Sillero-Zubiri( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Partage au sommet de la chaîne alimentaire : comment la hyène tachetée s'adapte à la présence de lions ? : coexistence des prédateurs apicaux dans une savane arborée by Stéphanie Périquet( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Being at the top of the food chain, apex predators have the potential to influence the whole community structure through food webs, even within their own guild. In Africa, lions (Panthera leo) and spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta, hyaenas hereafter) are the largest and most numerous predators, with hyaenas often thought to be subordinate to the larger lion Never the less, our understanding of their interactions is limited, even more in wooded ecosystems. This work focuses on identifying the mechanisms allowing for hyaenas and lions to coexist, such as resource and habitat partitioning. The main hypothesis is that hyaenas should avoid lions both spatially and temporally. A literature review shows that despite the high potential for exploitative and interference competition (high range and diet overlaps), hyaenas are present at nearly all sites occupied by lions and their densities are positively correlated. I collected data on hyaena and lion ecology, through direct observations and GPS collars, during 2.5 years of fieldwork in Hwange National Park (HNP), Zimbabwe. HNP is characteristic of a semi-arid dystrophic wooded savanna dominated by elephants (Loxodonta africana). In HNP, hyaena ecology is largely influenced by the location of artificial waterholes, elephant carcasses and lions. Hyaenas select for habitats where prey are abundant and locations close to artificial waterholes, as do lions. Hyaenas only spatially avoid lions in extreme conditions of vulnerability and risk. Elephant carcasses are a major source of food for hyaenas and their used increased during a period of increased intraguild competition with lions, which lead to switch in hyaena foraging strategy from active hunting to scavenging. The presence of large carcasses is probably promoting coexistence between the two large carnivores. Encounters with lions at carcasses are common and can occur during several consecutives nights with the two predators staying in the vicinity of each other. However, when not related to food, encounters are very short with both predators often moving away after being in contact. In stark contrast with the classical hypothesis, hyaenas in HNP do not show a general pattern of lion avoidance. Interactions between these two species are complex and hyaenas appear to respond to lion presence is reactive rather than predictive and very dynamic. Even though lions are their main competitors, in some circumstances hyaenas stay in their vicinity, as they can also be a source of food through scavenging and kleptoparatism. These results bring some light on the mechanisms of interaction and coexistence between large carnivores as well as the impact on management decisions on their ecology that could prove useful for planning their conservation
Is the grass greener on the other side? : testing the ecological trap hypothesis for African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) in and around Hwange National Park by Ester Van Der Meer( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

When animals show a preferential choice for sink habitat they are said to have been caught in an ecological trap. Habitat choice behaviour is beneficial in classic source-sink systems, as animals living in high quality habitat (natality>mortality) only choose to migrate into low quality habitat (natality<mortality) when there is not enough high quality habitat available. Within an ecological trap habitat choice is detrimental and can lead to rapid extirpation of a species, as animals living in high quality habitat choose to migrate into low quality habitat even when there is enough high quality habitat available. Ecological traps occur when sudden natural or human induced changes cause formerly reliable settlement cues to be no longer associated with an adaptive outcome, causing animals to make a maladaptive habitat choice. To be able to distinguish a sink from an ecological trap additional knowledge of the relationship between habitat preference and habitat quality is required. Within the Hwange system African wild dogs seem to base their habitat choice on the right fitness enhancing ecological cues. They experience a higher hunting efficiency in the buffer zone outside Hwange National Park, less competition with lions and spotted hyenas and a better access to suitable den sites. As a result African wild dogs outside the National Park give birth to larger litters of pups. However, due to an 'edge effect', human induced mortality in the buffer zone is so high it exceeds natality. African wild dogs nevertheless make a maladaptive habitat choice and move into the mortality sink outside the safety of the protected area as they are unable to judge habitat quality accurately by taking this human induced mortality risk into account. In other words, African wild dogs in the Hwange system are caught in an ecological trap in the buffer zone outside Hwange National Park
 
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Audience level: 0.63 (from 0.04 for Biology an ... to 0.97 for Canids: fo ...)

The biology and conservation of wild canids
Alternative Names
Zubiri Claudio Sillero-

Languages
English (51)

Covers
The wolf watchersBiology and conservation of wild felids