WorldCat Identities

Webb, Craig

Overview
Works: 21 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 613 library holdings
Genres: Architectural drawings  Drawings  Field guides  Pictorial works  Periodicals  Calendars  Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: NA737.G44, 720.92
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Craig Webb
 
Most widely held works by Craig Webb
Gehry draws by Frank O Gehry( Book )

5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 544 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Gehry has described drawing as his way of "thinking aloud"; Gehry Draws traces that thinking through 29 major projects, providing a privileged view of the creative practice of a master architect. More than 360 drawings (most of which are previously unpublished) and more than 400 additional illustrations chart the evolution of Gehry images from marks on the page to three-dimensional models to completed buildings. Horst Bredekamp's introduction relates Gehry's drawing methods to the concept of "disegno," as practiced by Leonardo and Durer - not only the act of drawing and modeling but also the dynamics of creative thinking." "Gehry himself describes his method for Bredekamp in several explanatory sketches, and Bredekamp applies this to a study of drawings made for specific Gehry commissions. Virtual-reality filmmaker Rene Daalder and writer Mark Rappolt return this discussion to the twenty-first century, looking at, among other things, analog methods in the digital world of contemporary architecture."--Jacket
The beginner's guide to identifying 100 Australian birds by Frank Haddon( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

5 editions published in 2005 and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

En façade, sous la marquise en acier: Entrée du Red Cat Theater aussi connu sous le nom de Roy and Edna Disney / CalArts Theater
Essays on choice under risk and uncertainty by Craig Webb( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

3 editions published in 2005 and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

P-115 Probiotic Modulation of Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in dogs. Similar to IBD in humans, microbial imbalances in dogs are characterized by a decrease in diversity and altered concentrations of beneficial/harmful species. While studies have reported alterations in fecal (luminal) bacterial populations, only limited information is available about the mucosal microbiota of IBD at diagnosis and in response to medical therapy. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mucosa-associated microbiota and determine the clinical, microbiological, and mucosal homeostatic effects of probiotic therapy in CIBD. Methods: A prospective, randomized double-blind clinical trial was performed. Thirty-four dogs diagnosed with moderate-to-severe IBD (CIBDAI score>5) were randomized to receive standard therapy (i.e., elimination diet and oral glucocorticoids = ST) with or without a multi-strain probiotic*. The mucosal microbiota from endoscopic intestinal biopsies of IBD dogs was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and qPCR targeting the 16S rRNA genes of total bacteria, group-specific organisms, and individual bacterial species shown to be relevant in human and canine IBD. Epithelial tight junction protein (TJP) expression was studied using immunohistochemistry. Clinical signs and changes in mucosal microbiota and TJP expression were temporally assessed before and after 8 weeks of probiotic therapy. Results: Both dog groups showed a reduction in GI signs after 8 weeks of IBD therapy compared to baseline CIBDAI scores (P <0.05). ST and probiotic therapy modulated the number of total bacteria of IBD dogs in a similar fashion. Changes in mucosal bacteria mirrored those for total bacteria except that Eub338-positive bacteria failed to increase (P = 0.13) in dogs treated with probiotic. When evaluating changes in the spatial distribution of mucosal bacteria following therapy, significant increases in bacteria hybridizing to probes against Eubacteria, Bifidobacterium spp., Fecalibacterium spp., and Enterobacteriaceae were observed within adherent mucus of dogs treated with ST. These same bacterial groups and Lactobacillus spp. were increased within the adherent mucus of IBD dogs receiving probiotic (P <0.001). A comparison of treatment effects affecting adherent mucus bacteria showed that ST therapy preferentially increased Bifidobacteria spp. (P <0.05) while probiotic therapy preferentially increased Lactobacillus spp. (P <0.001). Probiotic therapy was associated with up-regulated (P <0.05) expression of TJPs E-cadherin, occludin, and zonulin versus ST. Quantitative PCR failed to reveal significant shifts in fecal microbial composition regardless of treatment. Conclusions: This is the first study utilizing FISH methods to localize, quantify, and directly compare different medical treatments on mucosal bacterial populations in CIBD. The most important finding of this study obtained using FISH was the absence of a significant difference in mucosal bacteria following treatment of IBD dogs with ST versus probiotic. Microbiota from mucosal samples more clearly represent the underlying microbial dysbiosis, at diagnosis and in response to treatment, as compared to fecal samples. *Visbiome which contains the same strains, in the same concentration and proportions, and is therapeutically equivalent to the VSL#3 brand probiotic blend as produced before January 31, 2016
Earth omen by Frijid Pink( Recording )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

À droite: Grand escalier menant à l'entrée principale
[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

En gros plan: Mur de scène
P-115 Probiotic Modulation of Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in dogs. Similar to IBD in humans, microbial imbalances in dogs are characterized by a decrease in diversity and altered concentrations of beneficial/harmful species. While studies have reported alterations in fecal (luminal) bacterial populations, only limited information is available about the mucosal microbiota of IBD at diagnosis and in response to medical therapy. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mucosa-associated microbiota and determine the clinical, microbiological, and mucosal homeostatic effects of probiotic therapy in CIBD. Methods: A prospective, randomized double-blind clinical trial was performed. Thirty-four dogs diagnosed with moderate-to-severe IBD (CIBDAI score >5) were randomized to receive standard therapy (i.e., elimination diet and oral glucocorticoids = ST) with or without a multi-strain probiotic*. The mucosal microbiota from endoscopic intestinal biopsies of IBD dogs was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and qPCR targeting the 16S rRNA genes of total bacteria, group-specific organisms, and individual bacterial species shown to be relevant in human and canine IBD. Epithelial tight junction protein (TJP) expression was studied using immunohistochemistry. Clinical signs and changes in mucosal microbiota and TJP expression were temporally assessed before and after 8 weeks of probiotic therapy. Results: Both dog groups showed a reduction in GI signs after 8 weeks of IBD therapy compared to baseline CIBDAI scores ( P < 0.05). ST and probiotic therapy modulated the number of total bacteria of IBD dogs in a similar fashion. Changes in mucosal bacteria mirrored those for total bacteria except that Eub338-positive bacteria failed to increase ( P = 0.13) in dogs treated with probiotic. When evaluating changes in the spatial distribution of mucosal bacteria following therapy, significant increases in bacteria hybridizing to probes against Eubacteria, Bifidobacterium spp., Fecalibacterium spp., and Enterobacteriaceae were observed within adherent mucus of dogs treated with ST. These same bacterial groups and Lactobacillus spp. were increased within the adherent mucus of IBD dogs receiving probiotic ( P < 0.001). A comparison of treatment effects affecting adherent mucus bacteria showed that ST therapy preferentially increased Bifidobacteria spp. ( P < 0.05) while probiotic therapy preferentially increased Lactobacillus spp. ( P < 0.001). Probiotic therapy was associated with up-regulated ( P < 0.05) expression of TJPs E-cadherin, occludin, and zonulin versus ST. Quantitative PCR failed to reveal significant shifts in fecal microbial composition regardless of treatment. Conclusions: This is the first study utilizing FISH methods to localize, quantify, and directly compare different medical treatments on mucosal bacterial populations in CIBD. The most important finding of this study obtained using FISH was the absence of a significant difference in mucosal bacteria following treatment of IBD dogs with ST versus probiotic. Microbiota from mucosal samples more clearly represent the underlying microbial dysbiosis, at diagnosis and in response to treatment, as compared to fecal samples. *Visbiome which contains the same strains, in the same concentration and proportions, and is therapeutically equivalent to the VSL#3 brand probiotic blend as produced before January 31, 2016
Accounting for optimism and pessimism in expected utility by Craig Webb( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Discounting the subjective present and future by Jinrui Pan( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Au centre: Lillian Disney Fountain, fontaine en porcelaine blanche et bleue imitant une fleur s'épanouissant
Walt Disney concert hall documentation by Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Four architectural models and 20 drawings from the competition phase, from approximately 1988, document the Disney Concert Hall designs by James Stirling and Gottfried Böhm
[Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, 1999-2003( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Au centre: Grand escalier tournant
Raptor and Wildlife Refuge of Tasmania calendar( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Australian mammals( Visual )

in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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