WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:15:31 2014 UTClccn-nr870007210.27Sextus Empiricus0.531.00Myers family papers89701455nr 870007211988230Bury, R. G.Bury, R.G., 1869-Bury, R. G. f. 1869Bury, R. G. (Robert Gregg), 1869-Bury, R. G. (Robert Gregg), n. 1869Bury, Robert GreggBury, Robert Gregg, b. 1869Gregg Bury, Robert 1869-lccn-n50002828SextusEmpiricusnp-platoPlatolccn-n89623884Fowler, Harold North1859-1955trllccn-n88635997Lamb, W. R. M.(Walter Rangeley Maitland)1882-trllccn-no2004030804Platolccn-n80080289Shorey, Paul1857-1934trllccn-n79139459Platolccn-n83018254Pyrrhonof Elisnp-socratesSocratesnc-sextus empiricusSextus EmpiricusBury, Robert Gregg1869-Criticism, interpretation, etcState, ThePhilosophy, AncientSkepticismGreek literaturePhilosophyLogicPlatoPolitical sciencePyrrhon,--of ElisBury, Robert Gregg,PleasureUtopiasKnowledge, Theory ofLatin literatureClassical literatureSkeptics (Greek philosophy)Symposium (Plato)Logos (Philosophy)Logos (Christian theology)Bible.--JohnSocratesSextus,--EmpiricusPhysiologyFowler, Harold North,EthicsLawPhilebus (Plato)LoveMind and bodyRhetoricLaw--PhilosophyRobinson, ConstanceAir pilotsManners and customsMarriageCourtshipComposition (Music)Child, PaulBarry, Philip,FamiliesLogiciansNew York (State)--New YorkFlanner, Janet,Munch, Charles,Gielgud, John,American National Red CrossUnited States.--Office of Strategic ServicesO'Brien, Howard Vincent,Expatriate artistsFitzgerald, F. Scott--(Francis Scott),1869195118951897190919131914191719191923192419251926192719281929193219331935193619381939194019421943194819491950195219531955195719601961196219631964196619671968196919701971197319751976198019811983198419871988198919901993199419971999200020012004200520062007201220136123146612184PA3612ocn002655806ocn000833597ocn006380324ocn000310409ocn002638773ocn008711564ocn180640860ocn039541239ocn437583679ocn029115582ocn000514510ocn462313860ocn213822149ocn038617154ocn310592426ocn492961275ocn457889792ocn492961306ocn799982750ocn865318530ocn440950213148973ocn015865815book19330.56SextusSextus Empiricus+-+0579449215118863ocn003485139book19140.53PlatónPlato, with an English translation+-+959544921560434ocn000833597book19260.39PlatoThe lawsPLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times+-+866744921547842ocn002721658book19090.70PlatónThe Symposium of Plato46044ocn010903648book19290.39PlatónTimaeus ; Critias ; Cleitophon ; Menexenus ; EpistlesPLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times+-+620744921541427ocn000514510book18970.76PlatónThe Philebus of Plato35721ocn006263709book19140.63PlatoPlato, with an English translation14716ocn023367477book19330.33SextusOutlines of pyrrhonism+-+52400242351014ocn004690917book19400.59Bury, Robert GreggThe Fourth gospel and the logos-doctrineCriticism, interpretation, etc8115ocn029590022book19480.29SextusSextus Empiricus+-+0579449215677ocn029590021book19360.27SextusSextus Empiricus+-+1998449215635ocn006947747book19990.50PlatónPlato in twelve volumes. With an English translationPhilosophie / Antike+-+7936449215617ocn029590020book19350.29SextusSextus Empiricus+-+26784492155410ocn029590019book19330.31SextusSextus Empiricus+-+76584492153912ocn180640860book19350.73SextusAgainst the logicians"Sextus Empiricus' Against the Logicians is by far the most detailed surviving examination by any ancient Greek skeptic of the areas of epistemology and logic. It critically examines the pretensions of non-skeptical philosophers to have discovered methods for determining the truth, either through direct observation or by inference from the observed to the unobserved. It is therefore a fine example of the Pyrrhonist skeptical method at work. It also provides a mine of information about the ideas of other Greek thinkers, ideas that are in many cases poorly preserved in other sources. This volume presents Against the Logicians in a new and accurate translation, together with a detailed introduction that sets the work in its philosophical context."--Jacket+-+26784492153812ocn256665223book19490.39SextusAgainst the professors+-+0579449215309ocn256636203book19360.37SextusAgainst the physicists : against the ethicists+-+1998449215298ocn038617154book19090.70PlatoThe Symposium269ocn630823038book19350.35SextusSextus Empiricus : in four volumes+-+2678449215253ocn004948498book19290.37PlatónPlato, with an English translation; Timaeus, Critias, Cleitophon, Menexenus, Epistles, by R.G. Bury+-+620744921581ocn065768974book19610.39PlatoThe lawsPLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times11ocn702131678mix1.00Myers familyMyers family papersThe papers contain correspondence with family, friends, and acquaintances, plus a variety of personal papers, including obituaries, letters of sympathy, diaries, and scrapbooks documenting the lives of Richard E. and Alice Lee Myers and their children. Prominent correspondents include Stephen Vincent Benét, Nadia Boulanger, Grace Flandrau, John Gielgud, Charlotte Kett, Archibald MacLeish, and Gerald Murphy+-+0579449215+-+0579449215Fri Mar 21 15:08:53 EDT 2014batch28432