WorldCat Identities

Murray, James Briggs

Overview
Works: 112 works in 121 publications in 2 languages and 159 library holdings
Genres: Catalogs  Bibliography  Exhibition catalogs  Interviews  History  Biography  Folklore  Conference proceedings 
Roles: Interviewer, Director, Author, Production personnel, irr, Narrator
Classifications: E185.5, 792.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about James Briggs Murray
 
Most widely held works by James Briggs Murray
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture by Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture( )
in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Provides access to the catalogs of the Schomburg Center and information on the history, exhibitions and programs at the Center
Black visions '88 : lady legends in jazz, February 1-March 11, 1988 ( Book )
2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Black visions '89 : movements of ten dance masters : January 30-February 24, 1989 ( Book )
3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Black visions '87 : a salute to the Black filmmaker, February 1-28, 1987 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[An Interview with Rex Nettleford] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Rex Nettleford talks about his life and his work in dance and his career with the National Dance Theatre Company of Jamaica
[Jean Genet's The blacks : a panel discussion] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Panel discussion of Jean Genet's play The blacks and the issues it raises. Three members of the panel (director Gene Frankel, and actors Roscoe Lee Browne and Vinie Burrows) who participated in the 1961 American premiere of the play reminisce about that experience, and discuss the ongoing relevance of the play. The current revival of The blacks by the Classical Theatre of Harlem (represented by actor Ty Jones) is also discussed. Genet's play is compared to Lorraine Hansberry's play Les blancs
Black visions '90 : African Americans in space science : February 1-28, 1990 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[An Interview with Austin Hansen] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Austin Hansen discusses his life and career as a photographer
La cultura musical del tambor de acero by James Briggs Murray( )
2 editions published between 1988 and 1989 in Spanish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[An Interview with Nancy Morejón] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In this short interview, Nancy Morejón speaks about her poetry, Cuba, racism and sexism, her work with Casa de las Ameŕicas and reads two of her poems
Black images in American movies ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Donald Bogle lectures on black images in American movies focusing on the roles black performers play in Hollywood films. The lecture is based on Mr. Bogle's book entitled "Toms, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films" and is structured around those black stereotypes. Actors and actresses mentioned include Bill Robinson, Sydney Poitier, Ossie Davis, L.B. Jones, Steppin Fetchit, Willie Best, Mantan Moreland, Eddie Rochester Anderson, Nina Mae McKinney, Fredi Washington, Lena Horne, Dorothy Dandridge, Cicely Tyson, Diana Ross, Louise Beavers, Hattie McDaniel, Ethel Waters, Paul Robeson, Jauno Hernandez and Jim Brown. Bogle also mentions the Blaxploitation films and two superstars, Eddie Murphy and Richard Pryor
Oral history interview with Mme Adji Fatou Seck by Adji Fatou Seck( Visual )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Mme Seck, and her translator (unidentified) describe a healing ceremony of Senegal. The ceremony, called the Ndepp, is organized by the Lebou people to honor their ancestral spirits and to ask them to allow a cure to take place of one of their members. Performed over seven days and nights, it is a complicated ceremony with a precise set of rules and involves the whole community. The translator states what she practices is not a religion but a healing process. Ndepp is not a religion. It does not deal in any way with any God, but rather Ndepp is a traditional healing that incorporates practices that are unkowned in the western hemisphere. Mme Seck reiterates that Ndepp is not a religion but a traditional healing. It consists of healing a possessed body, which is not clinical but rather spiritual. She explains posession by spiritis; the different types of spirit that may possess an individual and how to exorcise that spirit. The conversation is joined by other participants; they attempt to place the healing ceremony within a western psychological context and also to explain the role of the healer within the native worldview ; draws comparison between clinical psychology and traditional medicine; they discuss Islam and traditional healing
[An Interview with griot Papa Susso] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Papa Susso, griot from Gambia, talks about the history of the griot in Gambia and his instrument, the Kora
Oral history interview with Dr. June Jackson Christmas, 1985 June 27 by June Jackson Christmas( Visual )
1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Dr. Christmas discusses her former employment at Harlem Hospital, her job as the commissioner of the New York Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Alcoholic Services and as Chair of the Behavioral Science Program at City College
[An Interview with Louis Lymon] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Louis Lymon talks about his music career and that of his brother, Frankie Lymon
Oral history interview with Rose Morgan by Rose Morgan( Visual )
1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Oral history interview with Pearl Primus] by Pearl Primus( Visual )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Oral History interview with Pearl Primus documents Pearl Primus' early years, dancing career, and anthropological pursuits
Oral history interview with Leon Thomas by Leon Thomas( Visual )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The oral history interview with Leon Thomas begins with Thomas describing events from his childhood in East St. Louis, Illinois. Born in 1937, Thomas was raised in a church-going family. His father, who had been a bootlegger in Mississippi, sang in the church choir. Thomas relates a story about his father's cousin named Man Davis for the legendary life he led in Columbus, Mississippi in the 1920s. As a youngster Thomas listened to B. B. King, Nat King Cole and Billy Eckstine. He sang Little Coquette in the first talent contest he won (1954-55) while in high school, he then won 3rd prize in a contest singing on KMOX radio. He recalls meeting Nat King Cole at a fund raising show at the Y in St. Louis, Missouri; says it was a profound experience. This led to his mother unsuccessfully encouraging him to learn piano. Being musically talented and athletic, Thomas was scouted in high school to play with the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians. Rather than attending summer camp, he began singing with Jimmy Forrest and Grant Green; Thomas says he always took singing for granted. Thomas explains how the voice was the first musical instrument. He explains how amplification and loud music have damaged his hearing, and that he requires his drummers to have a brush technique as does Leroy Williams. He says Mary Lou Williams warned him about loud music claiming it wasn't good for the aura; they also performed some religious music together. Thomas tells how his music has come full circle in that the message of peace he conveys through his singing now parallels the singing he did with Pharoah Sanders on the recording Karma; he now divides his work between singing a capella and with a trio. Thomas met Faye Adams while he was singing the blues at the New Arrow Club, Adams convinced him to move to New York where she introduced Thomas to Babs Gonzales. Through Gonzales Thomas met Betty Carter, Melba Liston and Mary Lou Williams, all of whom were encouraging and helpful in his career. One of his first gigs in NYC was replacing Austin Cromer at the Apollo. Billy Eckstine once referred to Thomas as the man with the four voices. In 1961 Thomas sang at John F. Kennedy's inauguration ball with the Count Basie Orchestra. Shortly afterwards, he was drafted into the Vietnam War, served six months of active duty and was discharged. Thomas then substituted for Irene Reid and O.C. Smith until he could work with the Basie Orchestra again. Thomas talks about Frank Sinatra taking over the Basie Orchestra, going on tour with the orchestra without singing until Tony Bennett intervened. From 1972-73 Thomas toured with Santana, recorded three albums, and made one video with the group. Carlos Santana dubbed Thomas the maharajah of the maracas. Thomas tells about performing with Count Basie's Band at a jazz festival in Cincinnati where he met Louis Armstrong for the first time; their second meeting was at the Grammy's in NYC. Thomas also recorded a duet with Armstrong on the album Louis Armstrong and Friends for Armstrong's 70th birthday. Thomas elaborates on his own voice and its spiritual implications in the music. Thomas concludes the interview by describing Louis Armstrong as being one of the most powerful, charismatic, beautiful, down-to-earth people he ever met. Thomas explains that the ultimate compliment was the compliment Armstrong once gave him
An Interview with Claude Marchant ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Mr. Marchant talks about his career in dance, including his work with the Katherine Dunham Company and his present work in Sweden
Eric Williams : his scholarship, work and impact ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Sandra Barnes, of the University of the West Indies, presents a talk accompanied by a slide presentation which discusses the use of Heliconia as a political symbol in Trinidad and Tobago and elsewhere in the Caribbean Area
 
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Languages
English (27)
Spanish (2)