WorldCat Identities

Ellison, Richard

Overview
Works: 98 works in 206 publications in 2 languages and 15,427 library holdings
Genres: Nonfiction television programs  Television interviews  Interviews  History  Documentary television programs  Personal narratives  Nonfiction films 
Roles: Producer, Author
Classifications: DS557.5, 959.7043
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Richard Ellison
Vietnam : a television history( Visual )

2 editions published between 1987 and 1996 in English and held by 373 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a multi-part series on the Vietnam conflict, covering the history of Indochina, the French wars, and United States involvement, using actual film footage from news and government archives
Interview with Edward Geary Lansdale, 1979( Visual )

6 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 162 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

General Edward Geary Lansdale was an advisor to French forces on special counter-guerrilla operations against the Viet Minh. From 1954 to 1957 he was in Saigon and served as an advisor to the American-backed government of South Vietnam. Lansdale recalls his experience fighting communist groups in the Philippines and credits that success for his being called to duty for Vietnam. Lansdale discusses the differences between fighting in the Philippines and Vietnam. He recalls that the Vietnamese had a strong distrust for foreigners and this resulted in a distrust of the government. However, Lansdale contends that it was not a mistake to support the French in Vietnam during 1950 as the French had been our allies in World War II and the United States had close cultural and economic ties with France. Lansdale also recalls his time as a special advisor to Ngo Dinh Diem. Lansdale explains at length the problems Ngo Dinh Diem had, such as being steeped in a Vietnamese Mandarin tradition that created his disengagement with the people and their needs. Lansdale also gives his opinion of Madame Nhu as a tragic figure who was extremely misunderstood
Interview with W. Averell (William Averell) Harriman, 1979( Visual )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 161 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Averrell Harriman was a long-serving U.S. ambassador who acted as the chief U.S. negotiator of the Paris Peace Accord. Harriman discusses the seeds of U.S. policy toward Indochina following World War Two, with Roosevelt and Stalin being in agreement that it would be best if the French did not return there. He expresses his displeasure that France was using Marshall Fund money to support its military in Vietnam. He describes U.S. presidents' different stances toward Vietnam and his experience at the Paris Peace Accord negotiations. He goes into great detail accounting for the various reasons for the U.S. being in Vietnam, including the two countries' postures toward the Soviet Union and China. He offers his impressions of Diem and other Vietnamese leaders
Interview with Maxwell D. (Maxwell Davenport) Taylor, 1979( Visual )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 161 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maxwell D. (Maxwell Davenport) Taylor, a United States Army General and diplomat, discusses briefly his Korean War experience and how that helped him in Vietnam. Taylor explains that when he first retired in 1959 he never thought the United States would become involved in Vietnam. Taylor recalls the Geneva Agreements in 1954 and that he disagreed with Eisenhower's decision about Dien Bien Phu. Taylor also discusses his impressions of Diem and how Taylor alleges the United States pulled the rug out from Diem, which created chaos that Taylor inherited when he became ambassador. Taylor recalls the Tonkin Gulf and the lessons of Vietnam
Interview with David Halberstam, 1979( Visual )

4 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 160 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

David Halberstam was a New York Times reporter in Vietnam during the War. He describes American press as a threatening presence for both the American and Diem governments. He recalls a wealth of anonymous sources willing to share their stories and describes a tension between the anti-communist, Cold War attitudes of news editors and accurate reporting from Vietnam - which would change after the Tet Offensive. He recounts President Kennedy's attempt to have him removed from his post in Vietnam, and Ambassador Lodge's visit to Saigon. Finally, he discusses the evolution of war reporting from a focus on the Vietnamese to a focus on the Americans and the dramatic effect of television news
Interview with Wayne Smith, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wayne Smith was a combat medic during Vietnam. Smith recalls his Cambodian operations that consisted of search and destroy missions. He discusses his role as a medic, to be as quick as possible to get to the wounded and make sure that they were evacuated. He talks about the waning public support during his time in Vietnam and the morale of the troops in Cambodia. Smith also recalls the news of the pullout in 1970 and how that affected the ongoing military operations
Interview with Scott Camil, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scott Camil served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1967. He describes his own negativity towards the Vietnamese during his tour, and the camaraderie among his group of Marines. He recounts in detail his first battle and his involvement in search and destroy missions during "Operation Stone" in 1967. Camil discusses the mood of American soldiers during the war and how it may have fed certain atrocities committed against Vietnamese civilians. Camil would later become an anti-war activist. He describes his personal transformation and his anger towards the US government upon his return from Vietnam
Interview with Paul C. Warnke, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secretary of Defense for International Affairs under LBJ, Paul C. Warnke recalls the bombing campaign against the North Vietnamese. He states that one of the misjudgments that the United States made was that victory was more important to the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese than to the Americans. Warnke recalls that even though the bombing was not working, there were no other solutions, so there was a reluctance in the administration to halt the bombing. He states that the turning point came when McNamara realized that the North Vietnamese wanted unification and saw the US as aliens. Warnke talks about his changing views regarding the war and that the US was in a tough situation since they were the ones invading a country, not trying to drive out invaders
Interview with Lucien Conein, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lucien Conein was an OSS officer in Vietnam in the early 1960s. He recalls the events leading up to the coup d'etat on November, 1963, which resulted in the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem's government. Conein reported plans of the coup to Ambassador Lodge and recalls the US government made it clear to the planners, ahead of time, that the US would neither support nor thwart Diem's overthrow
Interview with Leslie H. Gelb, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leslie Gelb served in the Defense Department in the late 1960s and later worked as a correspondent for the New York Times. He describes tensions within the Defense Department and recalls Robert McNamara's 1967 testimony that the bombing of North Vietnam was not working as a turning point. He discusses how America's lack of knowledge about Vietnam and its people shaped diplomacy. Finally, he describes inaccurate calculations on the part of General Westmoreland and how the Pentagon measured military success
Interview with Bill D. Moyers, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bill Moyers was Special Assistant to President Johnson for Legislative and Political Affairs and later become his Press Secretary. He describes a deep apprehension Johnson had about Southeast Asia immediately upon taking office - reinforced by advisers from the Kennedy administration who insisted he needed to deal with Vietnam. Nevertheless, he paid it little attention for his first year, particularly as he considered an escalation impossible in an election year. Moyers sources many of the failures in Vietnam not as a lack of American power and influence but as an inability for American leaders to understand what the North Vietnamese wanted. He closes by discussing the options presented to the president by Secretary McNamara, each of which reinforced Johnson's belief that there was no way to win the war
Interview with Ton-That Thien, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dr. Ton-That Thien served under Bao Dai and Ngo Dinh Diem. Here he describes his 1968 capture and interrogation by Communist forces, and his escape during the Battle of Hue with the help of American marines. He discusses the role of the American press in Vietnam and recalls a clash of opinion with Madame Nhu
Interview with Roger Hilsman, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roger Hilsman worked in the Kennedy Administration, first as director of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research and then as the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs. He was criticized for drafting a cable on behalf of President Kennedy to the American Ambassador to South Vietnam instructing the Ambassador to give direct support to the opponents of President Ngo Dinh Diem. He describes the Kennedy White House as youthful and confident but shaken when Soviet Premier Khrushchev announced his support for insurgencies around the world. He says this announcement paved the way for the US counterinsurgency operations in Vietnam. Hilsman says he tried to convince Kennedy that the way to fight guerillas was with guerillas themselves. He also recounts Kennedy's distaste for sending American troops into Vietnam. He describes meeting with South Vietnamese leadership in the early 1960s, the mixed signals they received, and a lack of political support for their policies. He says Kennedy was desperate to get America out of Vietnam
Interview with Paul M. Kattenburg, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Paul M. Kattenburg spent five months in 1952 at the US Embassy in Saigon, and from 1954 to 1963 worked in the Research and Analysis Division of the State Department. He notes that at the time there was a scarcity of Vietnam experts available due to the relative isolation of the region and the lingering effects of McCarthyism. Kattenberg also describes Saigon scene in 1952 and his impression of Bao Dai's government. Kattenberg states that the continued support Ngo Dinh Diem was decided by the US Ambassador to Vietnam Frederick Reinhardt. During this period the United States was not yet fully involved in Vietnam and considered to be subordinate to the French
Interview with Pierre Brochand( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in French and English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

French Diplomat Pierre Brochand served in Saigon and describes the last days of the American presence there. He discusses the failed opposition movement in South Vietnam, and recalls chaotic scenes during the fall of Saigon and the American evacuation
Interview with John Chancellor, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John Chancellor was a White House press correspondent during the early Johnson administration. In 1965, he became director of Voice of America. Here he describes President Johnson's relationship with the media and his mission at Voice of America. He discusses the challenge of broadcasting America's first "televised war" and describes tension for journalists between covering anti-war activity and amplifying it. He recalls Spiro Agnew's attack on the press. Finally, he describes the stages of war news coverage and the evolving relationship between the press and the government
Interview with David T. Dellinger, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

David Dellinger was a pacifist, anti-war activist, and a member of the Chicago 7 who was considered a stalwart in the non-violence activist movement during Vietnam. Born into a prominent Republican family in Massachusetts and educated at Yale, Dellinger recounts how he developed his political beliefs and the effect it had on those surrounding him. Dellinger also illustrates the power of the grassroots movement by using the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - that it was in fact, the movement at the grassroots level that changed the policy at the top. He talks about the reasons why he believes the United States got involved in Vietnam and why he marched on the Pentagon in 1967, as well as his feelings on why the march was successful. Dellinger also goes into detail about the disruption he helped create at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, the effect it had on the anti-war movement and the problems he saw with American democracy
Interview with Charles Sabatier, 1982( Visual )

3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Charles Sabatier served in the United States Army in the Vietnam War. Paralyzed by a bullet wound, he spent his post-war life as an activist for the disabled. He discusses his impressions of the Army at the time, and details the events surrounding his injury during the Tet Offensive. He describes his reintegration to American society and the struggles he faced as a veteran of an unpopular war and a disabled person. Mr. Sabatier tells of how his feelings toward the war changed, and how his paralysis changed his view of himself. He concludes with his thoughts on the anti-war movement, and expresses an understanding toward the Vietnamese against whom he fought
Interview with Le Van Tri, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Le Van Tri discusses his medical work treating fallen Viet Cong soldiers in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He describes working under difficult conditions at Bach Mai Hospital, where the operating room was located underground and lit by oil lamps. He also describes the bombing of the hospital and day-to-day struggles to provide medical care in a war zone
Interview with Frank Snepp, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Frank Snepp was the former chief analyst of North Vietnamese strategy for the CIA in Saigon. Snepp recalls the decision of the American forces to pull out of Vietnam. He discusses that Nguyen Van Thieu's cousin, Hoang Duc Nha was the sole member of the South Vietnamese government who did not believe that the Americans would continue to send support and tried to warn Nguyen Van Thieu not to rely on the Americans. He also recalls the corruption within the South Vietnamese government and how the CIA was told not to report any corruption within South Vietnam. Snepp further discusses the evacuation from Vietnam and how it was organized
 
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Languages
English (52)

French (1)