WorldCat Identities

Ellison, Richard

Overview
Works: 98 works in 194 publications in 2 languages and 16,017 library holdings
Genres: Nonfiction television programs  Television interviews  Interviews  History  Personal narratives  Documentary television programs  Military history  Nonfiction films 
Roles: Producer, Author
Classifications: E178, 959.704
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Richard Ellison
Vietnam, a television history( Visual )

10 editions published between 1983 and 1996 in English and held by 426 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A 13-part documentary program which follows events in Vietnam from the 1945 revolution against the French to the U.S. evacuation from Saigon in April 1975
Interview with Paul C. Warnke, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secretary of Defense for International Affairs under LBJ, Paul C. Warnke recalls the bombing campaign against the North Vietnamese. He states that one of the misjudgments that the United States made was that victory was more important to the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese than to the Americans. Warnke recalls that even though the bombing was not working, there were no other solutions, so there was a reluctance in the administration to halt the bombing. He states that the turning point came when McNamara realized that the North Vietnamese wanted unification and saw the US as aliens. Warnke talks about his changing views regarding the war and that the US was in a tough situation since they were the ones invading a country, not trying to drive out invaders
Interview with Scott Camil, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scott Camil served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1967. He describes his own negativity towards the Vietnamese during his tour, and the camaraderie among his group of Marines. He recounts in detail his first battle and his involvement in search and destroy missions during "Operation Stone" in 1967. Camil discusses the mood of American soldiers during the war and how it may have fed certain atrocities committed against Vietnamese civilians. Camil would later become an anti-war activist. He describes his personal transformation and his anger towards the US government upon his return from Vietnam
Interview with George W. Ball, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

George W. Ball served in the State Department under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, and later as Ambassador to the United Nations. He describes the early Johnson Administration as a period of "drift" when the US was becoming increasingly involved in Vietnam, a trend Ball opposed in numerous memos and meetings. Ball discusses his role as the voice of dissent within the Johnson administration, arguing that they learn from mistakes previously committed by the French in Vietnam. He recalls Johnson as a sympathetic and intelligent man who wanted to end the war but could not afford to lose it
Interview with Bill D. Moyers, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bill Moyers was Special Assistant to President Johnson for Legislative and Political Affairs and later become his Press Secretary. He describes a deep apprehension Johnson had about Southeast Asia immediately upon taking office - reinforced by advisers from the Kennedy administration who insisted he needed to deal with Vietnam. Nevertheless, he paid it little attention for his first year, particularly as he considered an escalation impossible in an election year. Moyers sources many of the failures in Vietnam not as a lack of American power and influence but as an inability for American leaders to understand what the North Vietnamese wanted. He closes by discussing the options presented to the president by Secretary McNamara, each of which reinforced Johnson's belief that there was no way to win the war
Interview with Lucien Conein, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lucien Conein was an OSS officer in Vietnam in the early 1960s. He recalls the events leading up to the coup d'etat on November, 1963, which resulted in the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem's government. Conein reported plans of the coup to Ambassador Lodge and recalls the US government made it clear to the planners, ahead of time, that the US would neither support nor thwart Diem's overthrow
Interview with Wayne Smith, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wayne Smith was a combat medic during Vietnam. Smith recalls his Cambodian operations that consisted of search and destroy missions. He discusses his role as a medic, to be as quick as possible to get to the wounded and make sure that they were evacuated. He talks about the waning public support during his time in Vietnam and the morale of the troops in Cambodia. Smith also recalls the news of the pullout in 1970 and how that affected the ongoing military operations
Interview with Roger Hilsman, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roger Hilsman worked in the Kennedy Administration, first as director of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research and then as the Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs. He was criticized for drafting a cable on behalf of President Kennedy to the American Ambassador to South Vietnam instructing the Ambassador to give direct support to the opponents of President Ngo Dinh Diem. He describes the Kennedy White House as youthful and confident but shaken when Soviet Premier Khrushchev announced his support for insurgencies around the world. He says this announcement paved the way for the US counterinsurgency operations in Vietnam. Hilsman says he tried to convince Kennedy that the way to fight guerillas was with guerillas themselves. He also recounts Kennedy's distaste for sending American troops into Vietnam. He describes meeting with South Vietnamese leadership in the early 1960s, the mixed signals they received, and a lack of political support for their policies. He says Kennedy was desperate to get America out of Vietnam
Interview with Frank Snepp, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Frank Snepp was the former chief analyst of North Vietnamese strategy for the CIA in Saigon. Snepp recalls the decision of the American forces to pull out of Vietnam. He discusses that Nguyen Van Thieu's cousin, Hoang Duc Nha was the sole member of the South Vietnamese government who did not believe that the Americans would continue to send support and tried to warn Nguyen Van Thieu not to rely on the Americans. He also recalls the corruption within the South Vietnamese government and how the CIA was told not to report any corruption within South Vietnam. Snepp further discusses the evacuation from Vietnam and how it was organized
Interview with Leslie H. Gelb, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leslie Gelb served in the Defense Department in the late 1960s and later worked as a correspondent for the New York Times. He describes tensions within the Defense Department and recalls Robert McNamara's 1967 testimony that the bombing of North Vietnam was not working as a turning point. He discusses how America's lack of knowledge about Vietnam and its people shaped diplomacy. Finally, he describes inaccurate calculations on the part of General Westmoreland and how the Pentagon measured military success
Interview with Pierre Brochand( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in French and English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

French Diplomat Pierre Brochand served in Saigon and describes the last days of the American presence there. He discusses the failed opposition movement in South Vietnam, and recalls chaotic scenes during the fall of Saigon and the American evacuation
Interview with Lloyd M. (Mike) Rives, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mike Rives was an American diplomat in Cambodia from 1969 - 1970. Mr. Rives describes the difficulty in dealing with Prince Sihanouk, and the atmosphere in Phnom Penh after Lon Nol took over the government. He speaks about the American incursion into Vietnam and his discussions with General Alexander Haig about giving military support to Lon Nol's government
Interview with Lucien Bodard, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

French reporter and writer Lucien Bodard recalls life in Saigon during 1954 and the rise of the Binh Xuyen, the Vietnamese paramilitary crime organization. Bodard also discusses the relationship between the United States and France and their relationships with the culture and people of Vietnam
Interview with Jane Barton, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jane Barton went to Vietnam with the American Friends' Service Committee to work in a rehabilitation clinic and to observe the treatment of prisoners in Quang Ngai, South Vietnam. She describes evidence of torture and the complicity of the American government. She describes the damages inflicted on Vietnamese civilians by relocation programs and by landmines. Finally, she discusses the negative attitudes of the Vietnamese in her area towards the government of South Vietnam and the American presence
Interview with Carleton Swift( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Carleton Swift, a CIA employee, replaced Archimedes Patti as head of the O.S.S. mission in Hanoi. Swift recounts why he got involved with Indochina and his experiences after he took the mission over from Patti. Swift recalls his impressions of Ho Chi Minh describing him as a slight man and Swift admits to not understanding how Ho Chi Minh gained so much power. Swift discusses the way the Americans dealt with the North Vietnamese and the friendships that developed
Interview with Harry McPherson, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Harry McPherson served as Special Counsel to LBJ from 1965 to 1969 and was Johnson's chief speechwriter from 1966 to 1969. McPherson begins the interview by recalling the conflicted mood at the White House following the Tet Offensive. The optimism found in military cables and official information clashed with televised images showing the nation that the war was resulting in massive loss of human life and that a prisoner could be shot at point-blank range. He also talks about the concerns LBJ had that the Vietnam War might escalate into a world war and that the goal was not to destroy North Vietnam but rather to keep them contained and not overthrow the government in South Vietnam. He ends the interview with a personal sketch of President Johnson, a complex and tragic figure
Interview with Ton-That Thien, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dr. Ton-That Thien served under Bao Dai and Ngo Dinh Diem. Here he describes his 1968 capture and interrogation by Communist forces, and his escape during the Battle of Hue with the help of American marines. He discusses the role of the American press in Vietnam and recalls a clash of opinion with Madame Nhu
Interview with David T. Dellinger, 1982( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

David Dellinger was a pacifist, anti-war activist, and a member of the Chicago 7 who was considered a stalwart in the non-violence activist movement during Vietnam. Born into a prominent Republican family in Massachusetts and educated at Yale, Dellinger recounts how he developed his political beliefs and the effect it had on those surrounding him. Dellinger also illustrates the power of the grassroots movement by using the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - that it was in fact, the movement at the grassroots level that changed the policy at the top. He talks about the reasons why he believes the United States got involved in Vietnam and why he marched on the Pentagon in 1967, as well as his feelings on why the march was successful. Dellinger also goes into detail about the disruption he helped create at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, the effect it had on the anti-war movement and the problems he saw with American democracy
Interview with Paul M. Kattenburg, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Paul M. Kattenburg spent five months in 1952 at the US Embassy in Saigon, and from 1954 to 1963 worked in the Research and Analysis Division of the State Department. He notes that at the time there was a scarcity of Vietnam experts available due to the relative isolation of the region and the lingering effects of McCarthyism. Kattenberg also describes Saigon scene in 1952 and his impression of Bao Dai's government. Kattenberg states that the continued support Ngo Dinh Diem was decided by the US Ambassador to Vietnam Frederick Reinhardt. During this period the United States was not yet fully involved in Vietnam and considered to be subordinate to the French
Interview with J. Vinton (Vint) Lawrence, 1981( Visual )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 163 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A former United States CIA paramilitary officer, Vinton J. Lawrence was stationed in Laos from 1962 to 1966. Lawrence recalls arriving in Vientiane. After the Geneva Convention only two CIA agents were allowed to stay in-country, Lawrence and Tony Poe. Together Lawrence and Poe set up base in Long Cheng and began to work closely with Vang Pao. Lawrence contends that Vang Pao was not a creation of the CIA but rather a trained soldier who had completed officer's school. Lawrence recalls his impression of Vang Pao as a dynamic man and a natural leader. Lawrence also talks about the evolution of Long Cheng from a bucolic place to a overpopulated shanty town. Lawrence recalls his feelings about his time in Laos and his sorrow as to what has happened to its people, who he believes have gone against their own best interests
 
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Languages
English (47)

French (1)