WorldCat Identities

Sen, Arijit 1963-

Overview
Works: 7 works in 18 publications in 1 language and 158 library holdings
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 307.76
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Arijit Sen Publications about Arijit Sen
Publications by  Arijit Sen Publications by Arijit Sen
Most widely held works by Arijit Sen
The kin system as a poverty trap? by Karla Ruth Hoff ( )
6 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An institution found in many traditional societies is the extended family system (kin system), an informal system of shared rights and obligations among extended family for the purpose of mutual assistance. In predominantly non-market economies, the kin system is a valuable institution providing critical community goods and insurance services in the absence of market or public provision. But what happens when the market sector grows in the process of economic development? How do the members of kin groups respond, individually and collectively, to such changes? When the kin system "meets" the modern economy, does the kin system act as a "vehicle of progress" helping its members adapt, or as an "instrument of stagnation" holding back its members from benefiting from market development? In reality, the consequences of membership in a kin group have been varied for people in different parts of the world. Hoff and Sen characterize the conditions under which the kin system becomes a dysfunctional institution when facing an expanding modern economy. The authors first show that when there are moral hazard problems in the modern sector, the kin system may exacerbate them. When modern sector employers foresee that, they will offer employment opportunities on inferior terms to members of ethnic groups that practice the kin system. These entry barriers in the market, in turn, create an incentive for some individuals to break ties with their kin group, which hurts members of the group who stay back in the traditional sector. The authors then show in a simple migration model that if a kin group can take collective action to raise exit barriers, then even if migrating to the modern sector and breaking ties increases aggregate welfare (and even if a majority of members are expected to gain ex post, after the resolution of uncertainty about the identity of the winners and losers), a majority of agents within a kin group may support ex ante raising the exit barrier to prevent movement to the modern sector. This result is an example of the bias toward the status quo analyzed by Raquel Fernandez and Dani Rodrik in the context of trade reform. The authors do not claim that all kin groups will necessarily exhibit such a bias against beneficial regime changes. But they provide a clear intuition about the forces that can lead to the collective conservatism of a kin system facing expanding opportunities in a market economy-forces that can lead the kin group to become a poverty trap for its members
Homeownership, community interactions, and segregation by Karla Ruth Hoff ( )
4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Making place space and embodiment in the city by Arijit Sen ( )
4 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Space and place have become central to analysis of culture and history in the humanities and social sciences. Making Place examines how people engage the material and social worlds of the urban environment via the rhythms of everyday life and how bodily responses are implicated in the making and experiencing of place. The contributors introduce the concept of spatial ethnography, a new methodological approach that incorporates both material and abstract perspectives in the study of people and place, and encourages consideration of the various levels-from the personal to the planetary-at which
Kin System as a Poverty Trap? by Karla Ruth Hoff ( )
1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Homeownership, Community Interactions, and Segregation by Karla Ruth Hoff ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The kin system as a poverty trap? by Karla Ruth Hoff ( Recording )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
"An institution found in many traditional societies is the extended family system (kin system), an informal system of shared rights and obligations among extended family for the purpose of mutual assistance. In predominantly non-market economies, the kin system is a valuable institution providing critical community goods and insurance services in the absence of market or public provision. But what happens when the market sector grows in the process of economic development? How do the members of kin groups respond, individually and collectively, to such changes? When the kin system "meets" the modern economy, does the kin system act as a "vehicle of progress" helping its members adapt, or as an "instrument of stagnation" holding back its members from benefiting from market development? In reality, the consequences of membership in a kin group have been varied for people in different parts of the world. Hoff and Sen characterize the conditions under which the kin system becomes a dysfunctional institution when facing an expanding modern economy. The authors first show that when there are moral hazard problems in the modern sector, the kin system may exacerbate them. When modern sector employers foresee that, they will offer employment opportunities on inferior terms to members of ethnic groups that practice the kin system. These entry barriers in the market, in turn, create an incentive for some individuals to break ties with their kin group, which hurts members of the group who stay back in the traditional sector. The authors then show in a simple migration model that if a kin group can take collective action to raise exit barriers, then even if migrating to the modern sector and breaking ties increases aggregate welfare (and even if a majority of members are expected to gain ex post, after the resolution of uncertainty about the identity of the winners and losers), a majority of agents within a kin group may support ex ante raising the exit barrier to prevent movement to the modern sector. This result is an example of the bias toward the status quo analyzed by Raquel Fernandez and Dani Rodrik in the context of trade reform. The authors do not claim that all kin groups will necessarily exhibit such a bias against beneficial regime changes. But they provide a clear intuition about the forces that can lead to the collective conservatism of a kin system facing expanding opportunities in a market economy-forces that can lead the kin group to become a poverty trap for its members. "--World Bank web site
Homeownership, community interactions, and segregation by Karla Ruth Hoff ( Recording )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.84 (from 0.47 for Homeowners ... to 0.95 for Homeowners ...)
Languages
English (16)