WorldCat Identities

Everingham, Susan S.

Overview
Works: 15 works in 42 publications in 1 language and 1,805 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Abstracts 
Roles: Author, Honoree
Classifications: HV5810, 362.70973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Susan S Everingham
What America's users spend on illegal drugs, 2000-2010 : technical report by Beau Kilmer( )

8 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,083 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drug users in the United States spend on the order of $100 billion annually on these drugs (in 2010 dollars). While this total figure has been stable over the decade, there have been important compositional shifts. From 2006 to 2010, the amount of marijuana consumed in the United States likely increased more than 30 percent, while the amount of cocaine consumed in the United States decreased by approximately 50 percent. These figures are consistent with supply-side indicators, such as seizures and production estimates. Methamphetamine consumption rose sharply from 2000 through the middle of the decade, and this was followed by a large decline through 2008. Heroin consumption remained fairly stable throughout the decade, although there is some evidence of an increase in the later years. For all of the drugs, total consumption and expenditures are driven by the minority of users who consume on 21 or more days each month
Controlling cocaine : supply versus demand programs by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

8 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This analysis examines only cocaine-control programs. That is a sufficiently ambitious undertaking, given the current state of the art of cost- effectiveness analyses of drug-control policies. However, the analytical methods used here are relevant to analyses of control programs for other illicit drugs, such as heroin and marijuana. Moreover, the programmatic conclusions of this study are likely to have analogues in those other drug-control efforts
Modeling the demand for cocaine by Susan S Everingham( Book )

5 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report documents the development of a two-state Markovian model of the demand for cocaine and includes the estimation of incidence, prevalence, cohort retention, and consumption. The study states that the incidence of new users into light cocaine use has varied greatly over the years and is an input to the model; however, the model cannot predict future prevalence--it can only project prevalence given a hypothetical incidence scenario. The model also demonstrates that the fraction of all cocaine users who are heavy users has varied greatly over time, and that peak heavy usage followed peak incidence by about ten years. Consequently, the effect on heavy usage of government programs that reduce incidence (such as prevention programs) will only be realized many years later
Response to the National Research Council's assessment of RAND's controlling cocaine study by Jonathan P Caulkins( Book )

5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1999, a scientific committee assembled under the auspices of the National Research Council issued a critique of RAND's 1994 "Controlling Cocaine" report. The committee concluded, "The findings of the RAND study do not constitute a persuasive basis for the formation of cocaine control policy." In the current document, RAND's Drug Policy Research Center rebuts the committee's claim. The Center shows that most of the committee's criticisms rest on an incomplete understanding of the model used in the RAND report or, when taken into account, do not result in important changes in the findings based on the model. The two remaining criticisms are that the data on cocaine treatment effectiveness are not adequate to support modeling and that the mode of price transmission down the cocaine production "pipeline" may be different from that assumed. The Center acknowledges these points as potentially valid but holds that models need not have negligible probability of error to be useful as decision aids
Expeditionary civilians : creating a viable practice of Department of Defense civilian deployment by Molly Dunigan( Book )

3 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Directive 1404.10 (2009) mandates a reliance on military and civilian capabilities to meet national security requirements and requires the identification of a subset of civilians to be organized, trained, and equipped to respond to expeditionary requirements. DoD policy on expeditionary civilians has yet to be fully implemented, however. This end-to-end review and analysis of DoD civilian deployment aims to inform DoD's policy and practice for using deployable civilians to meet mission needs ten to 20 years into the future. It assesses the viability of DoD's civilian deployment framework in meeting its current policy goals, identifies gaps between policy and practice, and proposes a systematic approach to developing and maintaining a civilian deployment capability that meets the current and future needs of U.S. combatant commands. The findings and conclusions are informed by a detailed policy review and interviews with more than 80 officials from organizations that deploy civilians, including DoD, the military services, the combatant commands, and analogous U.S. and foreign government agencies. The study was the first to review in detail combatant command requirements for expeditionary civilian capabilities. Looking ahead, lessons and insights from analogous organizations' approaches to civilian deployment could inform DoD civilian deployment policy and practice"--Back cover
Expeditionary Civilians : Creating a Viable Practice of Civilian Deployment Within the U.S. Interagency Community and Among Foreign Defense Organizations by Molly Dunigan( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Civilians routinely deploy to support military missions abroad. Internationally, defense departments have drawn on internal civilian capabilities to relieve pressure on the uniformed military, and some of these initiatives have been formalized into organizational structures. There are several known challenges associated with deploying civilians to operational theaters, however. For instance, from where should the capability be drawn? How should deployable civilians be selected, prepared, and protected in theater? How can an organization best manage civilians while they are deployed, ensuring that they will have secure jobs upon their return? Moreover, from a recruitment standpoint, how can an organization ensure a steady pipeline of willing volunteers to deploy? How are civilians perceived by and how do they operate among their military colleagues? An end-to-end review of guidance across the civilian deployment process in the U.S. Department of Defense involved investigating the deployment approaches of analogous organizations, both U.S. and foreign. These comparative cases provided insights into best practices and informed the development of four models of civilian deployment. The effort was supported by interviews with representatives from 17 government agencies in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, the European Union, and Australia with well-established civilian deployment programs. This report describes the requirements that generate the need for deployable civilians, the types of missions civilians support, and the methods that organizations use to identify, select, track, and deploy civilians. Findings from the full study can be found in the companion RAND report, Expeditionary Civilians: Creating a Viable Practice of Department of Defense Civilian Deployment"--Back cover
Investing in our children : what we know and don't know about the costs and benefits of early childhood interventions by Lynn A Karoly( )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study quantified the benefits to children and parents participating in nine early intervention programs and conducted a cost-benefit analysis of the Perry Preschool and the Elmira Prenatal/Early Infancy Project (PEIP). The findings indicated that early intervention programs led to the following advantages for program participants relative to those in the control groups: (1) gains in child emotional or cognitive development or improved parent-child relationships; (2) improvements in educational process and child outcomes; (3) increased economic self-sufficiency, initially for parents and later for children; (4) reduced criminal activity; and (5) improvements in health-related indicators. Savings to government programs were much higher than the costs for the Perry Preschool; this was also true for the higher-risk families of the PEIP. For lower-risk participants of the PEIP, however, government savings were not enough to offset program costs. (Two appendices detail the benefit cost analysis. Contains 159 references.) (KB)
Modeling the demand for cocaine by Susan S Everingham( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An ounce of prevention, a pound of uncertainty : the cost-effectiveness of school-based drug prevention programs by Jonathan P Caulkins( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book describes an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of model school-based drug prevention programs at reducing cocaine consumption. It compares prevention's cost-effectiveness with that of several enforcement programs and with that of treating heavy cocaine users. It also assesses the cost of nationwide implementation of model prevention programs and the implementation's likely effect on the nation's cocaine consumption. There is considerable uncertainty surrounding the magnitude of the effects of school-based drug prevention programs. However, a few things are clear. Nationwide implementation of a model program today is affordable, but it would not dramatically affect the course of drug use and the benefits would take years to accrue. Alternatively, the range of cost-effectiveness estimates derived for this book for prevention is comparable to that previously derived for different enforcement interventions. Furthermore, implementing model prevention programs seems to be justifiable in the sense that the benefits produced would likely outweigh the costs of the resources used. Includes tables and figures depicting results of the analysis. Ten appendixes address the implications and effects of cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, and cigarette use. (Contains 82 references.) (Author/MKA)
The dynamic terrorist threat : an assessment of group motivations and capabilities in a changing world by Kim Cragin( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As the war on terrorism wages on, our nation?s policymakers will continue to face the challenge of assessing threats that various terrorist groups pose to the U.S. homeland and our interests abroad. As part of the RAND Corporation?s yearlong?Thinking Strategically About Combating Terrorism? project, the authors of this report develop a way to assess and analyze the danger posed by various terrorist organizations around the world. The very nature of terrorism creates a difficulty in predicting new and emerging threats; however, by establishing these types of parameters, the report creates a fr
Enforcement or treatment? : modeling the relative efficacy of alternatives for controlling cocaine by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Response to NRC Assessment of RAND's Controlling Cocaine Study by Jonathan P Caulkins( )

1 edition published in 2000 in Undetermined and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Modeling the demand for cocaine by Susan S Everingham( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sizing relationships for ballistic missile defense constellations of kinetic energy weapons by Susan S Everingham( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Controlling cocaine : supply versus demand programs
Covers
Modeling the demand for cocaineResponse to the National Research Council's assessment of RAND's controlling cocaine studyInvesting in our children : what we know and don't know about the costs and benefits of early childhood interventionsModeling the demand for cocaineAn ounce of prevention, a pound of uncertainty : the cost-effectiveness of school-based drug prevention programsThe dynamic terrorist threat : an assessment of group motivations and capabilities in a changing worldModeling the demand for cocaine
Languages
English (41)