WorldCat Identities

Blanchette, Cornelia M.

Overview
Works: 38 works in 79 publications in 1 language and 2,263 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: LC89, 355.12
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Cornelia M Blanchette
Department of Education : multiple, nonintegrated systems hamper management of student financial aid programs : statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette, Associate Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division, before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, U.S. Senate by Cornelia M Blanchette( Book )

4 editions published in 1997 in English and Undetermined and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette to the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Reources discusses Department of Education information management systems that support the financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. These programs help the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), the Ford Direct Loan Program (FDLP), the Federal Pell Grant Program, and campus-based programs. Comments are based on work done for high-risk series and other studies done on federal student fiancial programs, as well as ongoing work analyzing the Department's development and use of information systems. There is concern that without effective information management resulting from fully implementing recent legislation--the Clinger-Cohen Act--the multiple, nonintegrated information systems currently operated by the Department may hamper its management of student financial aid programs. Over the past 30 years, separate information systems have been developed to support student financial aid programs. These multiple systems contain incompatible data in nonstandard formats--a situation that has led to inaccurate information, inefficient systems, and high costs. One of the causes of the current information systems' difficulties appears to be the lack of sound, integrated information technology, or systems architecture for managing the Department's portfolio of information systems that support student financial aid programs. The Clinger-Cohen Act of 1996 makes agency heads directly responsible for effective information technology. The Department of Education could benefit greatly by fully implementing the Clinger-Cohen Act. Full implementation of the law would provide another opportunity to correct many of the Department's student financial aid system weaknesses. Appendices list Education Department student financial aid systems and their contract costs from fiscal year 1994 through 1998. Contains a 10-item list of related GAO reports. (JLS)
Higher education : ensuring quality education from proprietary institutions : statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette, Associate Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division, before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations, Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives by Cornelia M Blanchette( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Testimony of the associate director of the Department of Education's Health Education and Human Services Division, Education and Employment Issues, addresses issues concerned with Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended in 1992. Title IV provides grants, loans, and work-study supports to students pursuing post-secondary education including that provided by about 5,000 proprietary schools. The testimony focuses on ensuring that only those schools providing quality education and training access Title IV funds. First, it provides a broad overview of the regulatory framework for Title IV programs and then reports trends such as default rates. It lays out a framework for: (1) examining the legislative provision limiting Title IV participation to schools receiving at least 15 percent of their revenues from non-Title IV sources and (2) determining the extent to which Title IV funds pay to train students for jobs in no- or low-demand occupations. Although positive trends are identified (e.g., proprietary schools' share of Title IV funding has declined), the default rates of students from such schools remain substantially higher at 24 percent than those for peers from nonprofit institutions. Throughout the testimony, graphs and tables illustrate the data presented.(DB)
Charter schools : issues affecting access to federal funds : statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette, Associate Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division, before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives by Cornelia M Blanchette( Book )

5 editions published in 1997 in English and Undetermined and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although all public schools could be eligible for federal funds under Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) programs, concerns have been raised about whether charter schools are receiving an equitable share of these federal funds. This report describes: (1) how federal Title I and IDEA funds are distributed to charter schools, and the opinions of charter-school operators on whether the distribution is equitable; and (2) which factors appear to be facilitating and impeding charter schools in accessing these funds. The report presents the preliminary findings of an ongoing research project involving case studies in seven states and a telephone survey of a representative sample of charter schools in those states. At the time of publication, 30 out of 50 telephone surveys had been completed. The preliminary results suggest that states are allocating federal funds in much the same manner as they allocate funds to traditional public schools. Most charter-school operators believed that they received an equitable share of federal Title I and IDEA funds. Barriers to accessing Title I and IDEA funds include a lack of enrollment and student-eligibility data, the time and cost involved in applying for funding, and the need for training and technical assistance. Appendices contain data on charter schools operating in school year 1996-97 in selected states, and on charter-school states and the number of schools operating in school year 1996-97. Four tables are included. (LMI)
 
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Languages
English (51)