WorldCat Identities

Wasem, Ruth Ellen

Overview
Works: 218 works in 661 publications in 1 language and 15,942 library holdings
Genres: Rules  Legislative materials 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: JV6483,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Ruth Ellen Wasem
 
Most widely held works by Ruth Ellen Wasem
Asylum and "credible fear" issues in U.S. immigration policy by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Unauthorized aliens residing in the United States : estimates since 1986 by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Asylum policies for unaccompanied children compared with expedited removal policies for unauthorized adults: in brief by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Temporary professional, managerial, and skilled foreign workers: legislation in the 113th Congress by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration : visa security policies by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Female genital mutilation (FGM): background information and issues for Congress by Tiaji Salaam-Blyther( )

in English and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alien legalization and adjustment of status: a primer by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 248 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mexican migration to the United States: policy and trends by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration policy on expedited removal of aliens by Alison Siskin( )

in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration of foreign nationals with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Medicaid citizenship documentation by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigration of foreign workers : labor market tests and protections by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Noncitizen eligibility and verification issues in the health care reform legislation by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. immigration policy on permanent admissions by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. immigration policy on asylum seekers by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. immigration policy on Haitian migrants by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Overview of immigration issues in the 112th Congress by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. immigration policy on temporary admissions by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

8 editions published between 2002 and 2011 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. law provides for the temporary admission of various categories of foreign nationals, who are known as nonimmigrants. Nonimmigrants are admitted for a designated period of time and a specific purpose. They include a wide range of visitors, including tourists, foreign students, diplomats, and temporary workers. There are 24 major nonimmigrant visa categories. These visa categories are commonly referred to by the letter and numeral that denotes their subsection in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA); for example, B-2 tourists, E-2 treaty investors, F-1 foreign students, H-1B temporary professional workers, J-1 cultural exchange participants, or S-4 terrorist informants. According to the most recent analysis, there were 1.8 million nonimmigrants who maintained a residence in the United States in 2008. Of the 1.8 million nonimmigrants, 50.8% (0.93 million) were temporary workers and their families, 32.2% (0.59 million) were students and their families, 13.1% (0.24 million) were exchange visitors and families, and 3.8% (0.07 million) were diplomats, other representatives, and their families. Although most nonimmigrants must demonstrate that they are not coming to reside permanently in the United States, many ultimately adjust their status to become legal permanent residents. The law and regulations set terms for nonimmigrant lengths of stay in the United States, typically have foreign residency requirements, and often limit what aliens are permitted to do in the United States (e.g., gain employment or enroll in school), but many observers assert that the policies are not uniformly or rigorously enforced. Achieving an optimal balance among major policy priorities, such as ensuring national security, facilitating trade and commerce, protecting public health and safety, and fostering international cooperation, remains a challenge
Visa security policy : roles of the Departments of State and Homeland Security by Ruth Ellen Wasem( )

in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foreign nationals (i.e., aliens) not already legally residing in the United States who wish to come to the United States generally must obtain a visa to be admitted, with certain exceptions noted in law. The Departments of State (DOS) and Homeland Security (DHS) each play key roles in administering the law and policies on the admission of aliens. Although the DOS's Consular Affairs is responsible for issuing visas, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigrant Services (USCIS) in DHS approves immigrant petitions, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in DHS operates the Visa Security Program in selected embassies abroad, and the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in DHS inspects all people who enter the United States. In addition, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) in the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has a significant policy role through its adjudicatory decisions on specific immigration cases. Although there was a discussion of assigning all visa issuance responsibilities to DHS when the department was being created, the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) opted not to do so. Some have expressed the view that DOS has too much control over visas, maintaining that the Homeland Security Act intended DHS to be the lead department and DOS to merely administer the visa process. Proponents of DOS playing the principal role in visa issuances assert that only consular officers in the field have the country-specific knowledge to make decisions about whether an alien is admissible and that staffing 250 diplomatic and consular posts around the world would stretch DHS beyond its capacity. Whether the visa security roles and procedures are adequately funded may arise as the budget is considered. This report will be updated as significant developments occur
 
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Audience level: 0.43 (from 0.37 for Asylum and ... to 0.94 for Ruth Ellen ...)

Languages
English (29)