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APA Psycbooks - York University

Overview
Works: 28 works in 28 publications in 1 language and 94 library holdings
Genres: Detective and mystery fiction  Historical fiction  Thrillers (Fiction)  True crime stories  Textbooks  History  Biography 
Classifications: BJ1251, 150
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Most widely held works by APA Psycbooks - York University
Progressive practices in directing learning by Anthony Ray Palmer( )

1 edition published in 1929 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"After attending a series of lectures, a young, inexperienced teacher remarked, "The lectures were very interesting and the principles discussed seemed important, but I do not know any more about putting the principles into practice than I did before." With the above remark in mind, the present volume has been written for the specific purpose of giving definite help to the classroom teacher by bridging the gap between general principles and their practical application. This book is a product of the author's experience as a teacher in directing the learning activities of pupils in the public school and students in the university. The topics treated and the materials selected have been chosen with the one thought in mind--to help the teacher direct the learning activities and individualize them in order to meet the individual needs of each pupil entrusted to her care. For this reason a large amount of illustrative material in the form of experiments, scientific studies, and progressive practices in teaching has been included in the present volume. For the student in teacher training classes this book provides material that will broaden her horizon and stimulate thought and discussion. For the inexperienced or untrained teacher it provides practical materials to serve as thought patterns as she thinks about her own pupils. For the experienced and well-trained teacher it offers a sound basis for constructive study of the problems encountered in directing the learning activities of the pupils in her classes. To summarize, it is the purpose of this book to help teachers direct the learning activities of their pupils through the use of progressive practices applicable anywhere under present conditions"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Training the senses and the child's memory by William Emer Miller( )

1 edition published in 1918 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First, read the entire book to get the scope of the work; then, apply the ideas and exercises according to the age of the child. Let the children advance as rapidly as they can master the work. Do not over-urge them, or make the work tedious. Above all, see that the children understand the principle, and apply it to all of its activities"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
The G. Stanley Hall lecture series, Vol. 5( )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The G. Stanley Hall Lecture Series is an annual program of five distinguished lectures presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association and subsequently published as a single, bound volume. The lectures represent content updates of recent literature in a large number of areas typically covered in a survey course in introductory psychology. This book, the fifth volume of the Hall Series, includes the five lectures presented at the 1984 meeting of the APA in Toronto, Canada. The lecturers and their topics are Duane M. Rumbaugh, comparative psychology; Jerome Kagan, developmental psychology; Anne Anastasi, psychological testing; N. Dickon Reppucci, public policy; and Douglas W. Bloomquist, perception and sensory processes. Although this series is primarily oriented to teachers of psychology, the lectures are of value to anyone interested in staying abreast of the most important developments in all areas of psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
The mind of a "member"; new bearings for service to home and work relations by Alfred D Sheffield( )

1 edition published in 1951 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is a modest legacy of shared thought which over the years has dwelt on questions of "success" in services to group relations. Its co-authors have long sensed a growing need, in the interest of community thinking about our institutions of work enterprise and home living, of contacts between practitioners in both fields to reach understandings about the kinds of goodness in "good" group relations which each means to help develop. To the immediate receivers of help good comes of it, perhaps quite to their content, if it simply leaves relief of thwarts and strains in difficult situations. To those who bear the expense of professional service, whether in a factory or in a neighborhood of families, results may seem good with relations smoothed in the grooves of accepted forms and feelings, however charged these may be with latent ill. For critical and loyally anxious thinkers about our institutional ways of life, that help brings most good where its receivers become alerted participants in a rethinking of values in their problems for solutions on new levels of relationship. Here the "alerting" is a question of recognizing the dynamics of response between persons in roles which present a complex structure of special sentiments and behaviors. What the community needs is more people who see these in terms of their higher "group-adjustive" possibilities. Otherwise what we get, especially in industry, is stock impulses just to "humanize relations" or to address large complex problems with mere moralizing appeals, as when voices during recent labor-trouble seemed a town-wide choir of earnest barkers-up of wrong trees. With such a background what is here offered is not an informative treatise covering family and factory matters, but illustrative examination of experiences in both fields to demonstrate leads toward the achieving of "good" membership-character. Its appeal lies in its concern with social learning in work-groups and homes; its aim is to stir fresh perceptions for powers of "situational thinking." The main steps in this sequence of chapters are (1) to remark the specific kinds of perceptive competency that qualify anyone to be a real "member"; (2) to illustrate the scope of socially adjustive learnings in the factory, where relationships are between persons as bearers of specialized roles; (3) to develop what a "culture-conscious" and "situational" approach can mean in services to the family, where people learn basic adjustive perceptions in their association as whole personalities; and (4) to enlarge on the nature of "success" in enrichments of individual participation, and in standards of group fulfillment for the community"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
Group psychotherapy; theory and practice by J. W Klapman( )

1 edition published in 1946 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of riddles giving answers to such questions as "If hamburgers grew on trees what would they be called?" or "How come all hippies stick together?"
Blondes and brunets by Katherine M. (Huntsinger) Blackford( )

1 edition published in 1916 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This little volume shows the general scheme used by Dr. Blackford in using color to determine character. It is not a text book,--that belongs in the author's extraordinary study course teaching people in detail the entire science, and how to use it,--but it is marvelously suggestive and illuminating. If it will only prove an alluring stepping stone for the reader toward the full comprehension and mastery of a science as essential as it is new, the volume will a thousand times repay him or her for the reading"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Dynamics of population; social and biological significance of changing birth rates in the United States by Frank Lorimer( )

1 edition published in 1934 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book looks at the social and biological significance of changing birth rates in the United States. The following topics are discussed: Population trends of American groups; Measurable characteristics of American groups; Influence of differential reproduction on the characteristics of the American people; Causes and control of population trends." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
The G. Stanley Hall lecture series, Vol. 3( )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These lectures are intended for use with introductory psychology courses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Psychology from the standpoint of a behaviorist by John B Watson( )

1 edition published in 1924 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature"--Publisher's description
The elements of moral science by Francis Wayland( )

1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is a treatise upon moral science. Being designed for the purposes of instruction, its aim is, to be simple, clear, and purely didactic. I have rarely gone into extended discussion, but have contented myself with the attempt to state the moral law, and the reason of it, in as few and as comprehensive terms as possible. The illustration of the principles, and the application of them to cases in ordinary life, I have generally left to the instructor, or to the student himself." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)
The child and his development by J. Murray Lee( )

1 edition published in 1958 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book has been written for undergraduates, graduates, and teachers who wish to understand the principles of human development which have most significance for working with children and adolescents in the classroom. We have put forth a hypothesis of the basic universal driving force of human life. From this we have developed implications which seem both to follow logically and to fit the best and most recent findings of research. On the basis of these implications we have postulated techniques of obtaining more detailed and specific knowledge about individuals and groups. Then with the basic understandings and their implications, and the specific information as a background, we have proposed ways of working with children which are consistent with the original basic point of view. Thus we hope the ideas and concepts in this book are a totality, that they are not isolated "truths" which may well be mutually contradictory when seen against a background of basic assumptions. Our particular approach derives from the conviction that individuals are basically the same from infancy to old age. They have the same motivating force, the same needs, satisfied in very similar ways. We feel that the understanding of the physical and psychological developmental patterns combined with comprehension of what the child is trying to accomplish help a teacher more than any of the other approaches. Applications for the teacher and to teaching have been stressed throughout the book. It is primarily concerned with the school-age child from 6 to 18. The concepts developed and the illustrations used are those we feel will give the teacher the most help in understanding and working with children"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
The maze test and clinical psychology by S. D Porteus( )

1 edition published in 1959 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In continuous use since 1915, the Porteus Maze test retains its original character and is easily the most durable test in clinical practice today. Yet in the last fifteen years new and striking proofs of its validity have been forthcoming. It is now accepted as the most sensitive measure of brain damage available. The most recent follow-up of Columbia-Greystone patients (1958) showed that 94 per cent of patients who suffered superior cortical topectomies exhibited marked Maze test impairment. No other test scale reflects such consistent losses following all types of psychosurgery, vitamin B deficiency, or use of a tranquilizing drug. Thus the Maze is by far the most sensitive indicator of induced deficits. It can therefore be described as a psychosomatic test. For 45 years it has proved valuable in the diagnosis of mental deficiency and the qualitative scoring reveals reliable differences between delinquents and non-delinquents. But the most amazing new development concerns the test's projective-expressive aspects, the execution of which makes it possible to match a single individual repetition in 90 per cent of cases. Upon this is based a self-consistency or flexibility score. This new volume describes both the Original and Extension series, discusses their theoretical framework, presents simplified test quotient tables, and sets forth concise rules for application and scoring of the tests"--Jacket. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
The vanity of arts and sciences by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim( )

1 edition published in 1694 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"It is an old opinion, and the concurring and unanimous judgment almost all philosophers, whereby they uphold, that every Science addeth so much of a sublime Nature to Man himself, according to the Capacity and worth of every person, as many times enables then to Translate themselves beyond the Limits of humanity, even to the Celestial Seats of the Blessed. From hence have proceeded those various and innumerable Encomiums of the Sciences, whereby every one hath endeavour'd, in accurate, as well as long. I, persuaded by reasons of another nature, do verily believe, that there is nothing more pernicious, nothing more destructive to the well-being of Men, or to the Salvation of our Souls, than the Arts and Sciences themselves."
Children's behavior : viewed by adults and children by Sophie Ritholz( )

1 edition published in 1959 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The author's study which constitutes this book is significant for two reasons. First, it fills the gap in our knowledge of how the different actors in this complex drama of interpersonal relationships--parents, teachers, mental hygienists, and children--view childish behavior. It shows us what other studies along the same line have not, to date, revealed, namely, the child's side of the story. In the second place, it has emphasized what other studies of children have hinted at but have failed to prove conclusively, the relative importance of parents' and teachers' roles in determining the child's self-concept after he reaches the school age. While written primarily for scientists as a report of a research study made by the author, this book offers much that can be of real value to both parents and teachers. Without reading between the lines, they can see the handwriting on the wall in the form of a warning to stop, look, and listen when dealing with childish behavior which, heretofore, they have automatically labelled as "problem behavior." If it serves the purpose of awakening them to the serious responsibility they have in dealing with such behavior, it will then have made an important contribution to our present knowledge"--Foreword. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
The G. Stanley Hall lecture series by Vivian Parker Makosky( )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The G. Stanley Hall Lecture Series is an annual program of five distinguished lectures presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association. The lectures represent content updates of recent literature in a large number of areas typically covered in a survey course in undergraduate psychology. Although the series is primarily oriented to teachers of psychology, the lectures are of value to anyone interested in staying abreast of the most important developments in all areas of psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
The practical phrenologist and recorder and delineator of the character and talents of [blank], as marked by [blank] : a compendium of phreno-organic science by O. S Fowler( )

1 edition published in 1869 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"To teach learners these organic conditions which indicate character, is the first object of this manual. And to render it accessible to all, it condenses facts and conditions, rather than elaborates arguments, - because to expound Phrenology is its highest proof, - states laws and results, and leaves them upon their naked merits; embodies recent discoveries, and crowds into the fewest words and pages just what learners most need to know, and hence requires to be studied rather than merely read. To record character is its second object."
Personality; studies in personal development by Harry Collins Spillman( )

1 edition published in 1919 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The essays comprising this volume are based upon a series of addresses delivered by the author before the New York high schools under the joint auspices of the New York Board of Education and the New York Chamber of Commerce. Surmounting the generally-accepted arts and sciences of our highly developed age is a super-art, recorded by Plato but by no means universally practiced since his day--The Art of Living. Man, nature's final effort in the scheme of evolution, the unchallenged conqueror of the world, is less efficient in many habits of life than the animals which centuries ago vanished in his path of progress. Ambitious men and women must prepare to meet hew standards of measurement--Intellectually, physically, morally. Whatever the ambition--to become a stenographer, an engineer, a banker, or even the President of the United States--one must first be a real man before he can build any of these. This book has been written for those schools that recognize this truth and have grown weary in well-directed effort to train men and women for the professions by a composite of mathematics, language, science, shorthand, etc., homeopathically or hypodermically administered. In short, the book has been written for all men and women who concede that the best school can give only a poor start in the direction of a real education; that we never graduate at all but are always in a state of educational transit; that man's intellectual and spiritual unfoldment is a matter quite apart from books; and that the greatest school of all is the classroom wherein he finds himself both teacher and student--the school of self-discovery and development"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Types of mental defectives by Martin W Barr( )

1 edition published in 1920 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The information most eagerly sought by those entering upon the work among the feeble-minded is naturally how to easily recognize the various forms of mental defect, in order that they may define, and meet promptly, the special needs of those with whom they are brought in daily contact. To this end, types of various grades are useful as sign-posts pointing the way to successful diagnosis of defect-mental, moral and physical. In defining types many points, such as have been indicated by tests, as well as by the stigmata of degeneration noted in the individual, are to be considered. Appended herewith will be found the educational classification, which, as the outgrowth of a close study of cases and careful adaptation to needs-indorsed by both physicians and teachers-has proven in a long experience the best one as simplifying the tasks of all engaged in the work. This classification is arrived at by first separating broadly the untrainable idiot from the trainable imbecile in asylum, custodial, and school division; next by dividing the imbeciles into grades of mentality for the awakening and further development of power along lines suited to the capacity of each; and finally by indicating possible training for life work in industrial or manual lines according to individual proclivity"--Foreword. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)
The elements of statistical method by Willford Isbell King( )

1 edition published in 1916 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The purpose of this book is to furnish a simple text in statistical method for the benefit of those students, economists, administrative officials, writers, or other members of the educated public who desire a general knowledge of the more elementary processes involved in the scientific study, analysis, and use of large masses of numerical data. While it is intended primarily for the use of those interested in sociology, political economy, or administration, the general principles set forth are applicable likewise to every variety of statistical data. The author has found that the members of his classes in this subject were not, as a rule, expert mathematicians, and he believes that this is true of a majority of those persons who are called upon to make practical use of statistics, hence, no pretense whatever has been made, in this work, of presenting any but the most simple of the mathematical theorems upon which statistical method is based"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
The life of Naomi Norsworthy by Frances Caldwell Higgins( )

1 edition published in 1918 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The author of this book is fortunate, it seems to me, in that she has not sought to write a detailed biography or make a sketch or give a portrait of Naomi Norsworthy. It is rather a tribute of a friend to a friend, with just enough detail to show why that friendship was close and reciprocal. The most striking characteristic of Miss Norsworthy was her genius for friendship. There was withal in her something of the Puritan. Her lovable nature, cheerful disposition, and largeness of heart were tempered with a natural reserve and controlled by a searching conscience that often led her into conflict with herself. In time of stress she needed a confessor. The revelation of herself at such times disclosed the weakness of the woman and the strength of the devotee. Had she been born in another faith or in an earlier age, she might have been the Mother Superior of a religious order. As it was, she became a teacher, and, faithfully following in the footsteps of the Master, she spent herself that others might have life and have it more abundantly"--Foreword. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)
 
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