WorldCat Identities

ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND NUTRITION LAB DENVER COLO

Overview
Works: 77 works in 78 publications in 1 language and 80 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND NUTRITION LAB DENVER COLO
Calcium in sweat and its possible relation to calcium requirements( Book )

2 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Indirect calorimetry by new techniques. a description and evaluation( Book )

1 edition published in 1954 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bibliography of u.s. army medical research and nutrition laboratory reports and reprints for 1964( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Environmental temperature and energy expenditure( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study indicates that as the environmental temperature increases there is also an increase in metabolic rate of men performing a fixed activity. There was a significantly higher metabolic rate for men working at 100 F than at 85 and 70 F. Body temperatures also were significantly higher at 100 F than t 85 and 70 F environments. These data again suggest that there is an increase in energy requirements for men living and working in the heat. (Author)
Annual progress rept. for 1 july 61-30 june 62 on internal medicine and basic research in life sciences( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The caloric requirements of men performing moderate physical activities at 3475 meters( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Two groups of young volunteers, one from a sea level area and the other from an elevation of 1610 meters were studied at an elevation of 3475 meters for periods of 24 and 20 days, respectively. The data suggest that after the first week of exposure, there is no increase or decrease in the energy requirements of men living at altitudes of 3475 meters and performing moderate physical activities. The question as to the best nutrient composition of the diet at this altitude was investigated, and it is suggested that the composition and distribution of the food calories consumed are a matter of food habit and preparation. Preliminary information on blood changes reveals that there may be some voluntary dehydration during the first week of high altitude exposure. Information was evaluated on the individual food preferences and acceptability of the US Army ration used in this study. (Author)
Excretion of thiamine and its metabolites in the urine of young adult males receiving restricted intakes of the vitamin( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Eight young men consuming a 2800-kcal diet consisting of 80 g protein, 100 g fat and 400 g carbohydrate and providing 0.11 to 0.18 mg thiamine/day, developed clinical symptoms of thiamine deficiency in 9 to 27 days. Thiamine excreted in the urine decreased to less than 50 micrograms/day at the sixth day to the undetectable levels by the eighteenth day of depletion. Low-level repletion (0.54 to 0.61 micrograms/day) for 12 days failed to produce detectable levels of thiamine in the urine. Red blood cell transketolase activity declined with progressive thiamine deficiency and returned to normal levels with low-level repletion. The excretion of the pyrimidine and thiazole moieties of thiamine as metabolites of the vitamin appeared to increase above the levels found with the use of a diet with sufficient thiamine (about 2 mg/day), and was reduced to control levels following low-level repletion. The pyrimidine moiety in the deficient individual appears to be further catabolized. There appears to be a body store of thiamine which is utilized during a period of deficient intake. Serum cholesterol, nonesterified fatty acids, blood phospholipids, creatinine and hematocrit did not change appreciably during thiamine deficiency. The biochemical pattern for thiamine deficiency in human adults is described. (Author)
Fatty acid composition of plasma and liver lipid components as influenced by dietary protein and cholesterol in growing chicks( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Feeding low protein diets to growing chicks results in elevated plasma cholesterol and glyceride levels, but does not alter the plasma lipid phosphorus levels in the absence of dietary cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol elevated all plasma lipid components regardless of dietary protein level; however, the increases were greater in the low protein fed groups. Dietary cholesterol also significantly increased liver lipid levels, more so in the high protein fed animals. The fatty acid composition of plasma and liver cholesterol esters, glycerides and phospholipids was altered by the dietary treatments employed. Although similar changes were noted in all fractions, the phospholipid and glyceride fractions appeared to be refractive to fatty acid changes as compared to the cholesterol esters. Elevations in plasma cholesterol attributable to either low protein or cholesterol feeding were accompanied by decreased linoleic and arachidonic and increased oleic acid levels. The possible relationship of these alterations to atherosclerosis and abnormal lipid metabolism is discussed. (Author)
Nutrition survey: ranger department fort benning, georgia( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

AR 40-5 prescribes the minimal nutrient intake of a physically active individual living in a temperate environment and subsisting on a garrison or field type ration to be 3600 calories/man/day. The daily food consumption of the Ranger Department trainees, Fort Benning, Georgia, over the entire training period, using the chemical analyses of the food composites averaged 4404 calories or an increase of 22.2% over the daily prescribed intakes. When one utilizes the caloric equivalent of the body weight change ( -70 gm/man/day or 442 calories) the energy requirements averaged 4846 calories/man/day. This was equivalent to an increase of 34.5% over the prescribed daily minimal intakes. This fairly high requirement was not unexpected since the men worked long hours, especially during the field training phase, and were under stress imposed by continuous physical and mental harassment. (Author)
Replacement of Superior Vena Cava with Autogenous Tissue( Book )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Autogenous pericardium and vein were used to replace a maximally resected superior vena cava (average length, 5.5 cm.) in the mongrel dog. Simple replacement failed because of thrombus formation at the suture lines. Limited success was obtained with pericardium complemented with an arteriovenous fistula placed 1 cm. cephalad to the cephalad suture line. An autogenous vein graft with a similar complementary fistula was successful in 15 consecutive preparations. These animals, followed for one year, showed normal function with nearly perfect anatomical restoration without anticoagulant therapy. The fistula maintained graft patency probably because turbulence prevented thrombus retention while neointima formed. The fistulas had closed spontaneously in 6 dogs at one year; the remainder were nearly closed. (Author)
THE EFFECT OF DIET ON JEJUNAL ENZYMES( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In order to study gastrointestinal disease it is necessary to define the normal metabolic processes of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Biopsies of the jejunal mucosal epithelium were performed on normal healthy male volunteers, obese patients undergoing starvation for weight reduction, and certain patients with chronic gastrointestinal disease. Controlled diets were given to volunteers and patients and the effect of these diets on various jejunal enzyme activities was measured. The normal response of jejunal enzyme activities to dietary substances and the responses of these same enzymes in the patients were determined. The study of the effect of dietary substances on normal jejunal enzyme responses has led to the uncovering of several regulatory mechanisms for jejunal enzymes. This in turn has led to the elucidation of a number of puzzling clinical gastrointestinal conditions. The regulation of jejunal enzyme activities by dietary substances is a normal physiological process and when this process fails to occur clinical disease develops. (Author)
Summary of significant findings by sgo irradiated food contractors( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A summary of radiation effects on rats and dogs after the consumption of irradiated foods is presented
Influence of mineral supplementation on serum lipids in normal and thyroidectimized rabbits( Book )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

New Zealand rabbits were used to study the effects of mineral supplementation on serum cholesterol, total fatty acids and lipid phosphorus in fasting normal and thyroidectomized animals. (Author)
Report of Analyses of 1972 Microbiological Data Collection Program by James L Fowler( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A large volume of valuable food microbiological data is generated annually by Department of Defense laboratory facilities. These data have great potential applications in military public health and as a research tool in food hygiene. A Centralized Computerized Microbiological Data Collection Program was designed and implemented by the Food Hygiene and Computer Division, U.S. Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratory. During the calendar year 1972, there were 11 DoD laboratories which participated in the program. Microbiological food testing data from these laboratories were transmitted to USAMRNL, where it was coded and entered into a computer file. At the end of the year, data were retrieved by selected codes. The result of analyses of this file is presented in the form of graphs and tables. (Author)
Cardiopulmonary responses of resting man during early exposure to high altitude( Book )

1 edition published in 1967 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sixteen young male subjects were exposed to simulated altitudes of 2,000, 11,000 and 15,000 ft in a hypobaric chamber and measured at sitting rest after 10, 20, 30 and 40 hours of exposure. Of those measurements made, only Pa O2 changed significantly with time of exposure. Cardiac output rose from 71 at 2,000 ft to 84 and 123 ml/min/kg at 11,000 and 15,000 ft, respectively. This was due to a significant increases in heart rate at both higher elevations with no alteration in stroke volume. Mean arterial blood pressure was unaltered and, therefore, peripheral resistance fell concomitant with the rise in cardiac output. Mean Pa O2 for the three altitudes was 94, 63 and 44 mm Hg; and for % Sa O2: 99 92 and 79. Largest changes in Pa CO2 and pH were observed between 2,000 and 11,000 ft and much less between 11,000 and 15,000 ft. Changes in cardiac output appeared best related to alterations in arterial O2 content or saturation rather than tension, suggesting a peripheral rather than a central origin for the stimulus of the cardiovascular response to high altitude. Most observed circulatory responses appear to follow an exponential relationship with altitude. (Author)
Microflora of Prepared Salads and Specialty Items Procured for Use by DOD Installations by James L Fowler( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Twenty-three prepared salads were obtained from military installations in selected geographic areas of the United States. These were examined microbiologically on arrival at USAMRNL and weekly thereafter for five weeks. Emphasis was placed on the detection and enumeration of food-borne pathogens. The few pathogens initially detected rapidly died off; however, yeasts and molds, as well as other microorganisms reflected by the Standard Plate Count, proliferated to extremely high levels in shrimp, macaroni, carrot and rasin and egg salads. Sixty-four salads and specialty items were surveyed for compliance with Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) microbiological limits. Standard Plate Count violations occurred in 15.6% of the samples, coliform violations in 21.8% of the samples, and yeast and mold violations in 45.3% of the samples. On a combined basis, 56.3% of the samples failed to comply with AAFES microbiological limits. (Modified author abstract)
Laboratory Technique for Producing Microfilariae of 'Dirofilaria immitis' in Mosquitoes( Book )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The basic technique which makes controlled experiments with infective microfilariae (Dirofilaria immitis) possible is the experimental production of third-stage filariae. The technique described is one which has been used by the 406th Medical Laboratory for many years; its development has been the work of many investigators from the Department of Entomology and the Department of Veterinary Medicine. (Author)
Nutrition Survey of Two Consecutive Training Cycles of the Airborne Training BN, CO. 'G', Fort Benning, Georgia, October-November 1953( Book )

1 edition published in 1955 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The primary purpose of this survey was to determine (a) the total food consumption from all sources by these trainees, (b) the nutrient composition and the nutritional adequacy of the ration, (c) the nutritional status of the troops and (d) the energy balance of the troops. The study also included a comparison of the various methods of computing food consumption and food losses
Body composition of a military population ft. carson 1963. i. body density, fat, and potassium 40( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Body volumes were measured on 97 soldiers between the ages of 17 - 52 years by water displacement volumetry and corrected for respiratory gas by a nitrogen washout technique. Total body potassium 40 was measured by a NaI crystal low level gamma radiation counter. The subjects were grouped into 5 year age increments and compositional changes were noted to occur in per cent body fat and quantity of body potassium present. Body density decreased with age reflecting an increase in body fat. Total body potassium decreased with age. Both parameters varied independent of body weight and appear age dependent. Eight additional obese subjects were found to have the lowest body density and total body potassium values (gm K/kg body weight). Effective ranking of body fat burden of populations was demonstrated by body volumetry and age differences were noted from potassium 40 counting. A correlation coefficient of r = 0.731 was demonstrated between body density and body potassium (gm K/kg body weight). (Author)
The excretion of lipid and lipid substances in human sweat( Book )

1 edition published in 1963 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the losses of lipid substances in sweat, under conditions of profuse sweating, were of significance. Under the conditions of this study at high environmental temperatures, the total excretion of lipid substances in sweat was low and would not seem to be of consequence in studies of lipid metabolism. During a 7 1/2 hour exposure period at high temperatures, the total lipid excretion in sweat ranged between 25 and 46 mg. As one would expect, since the total lipid excretion in sweat was low, the excretion of cholesterol, free and total, and lipid phosphorus were also low. (Author)
 
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Audience level: 0.96 (from 0.86 for Indirect c ... to 0.99 for Calcium in ...)

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English (21)