WorldCat Identities

City Univ. of New York, Ny. City Coll Department of Asian Studies

Overview
Works: 13 works in 13 publications in 1 language and 17 library holdings
Classifications: F128.9.C5, 305.8951073
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ny. City Coll City Univ. of New York
Gangs in New York's Chinatown. Monograph No. 6 by Betty Lee Sung( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In order to examine the phenomenon of gangs among Chinese youths in New York, interviews were conducted with members of the Chinatown community and with persons working in this community. In this document the texts of the author's discussions with eight individuals are presented. A social worker who works with delinquent Chinese youth and a former gang member now working in an outreach project characterize gang members and their motivations, and describe gang activities. A Young Chinese man, not a member of a street gang, talks about life in Chinatown. Two policemen and a Chinatown civic leader also discuss gang related problems. In addition, information obtained in an interview with two "hard core" gang members, and the author's assessment of their comments, are presented. Changes in the character of Chinese youth gangs over the years are evident through these interviews. Some immigration figures, as well as arrest statistics, are offered to help illustrate these changes. Recommendations for remedying the youth gang problem are addressed to government, community and school officials, and to the youths and their parents. (Gc)
National Conference on Asians in America and Asian Americans. Sponsoredby the Asian American Assembly for Policy Research by Ny. City Coll City Univ. of New York( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this report, the activities of a conference on Asian Americans and Asians in America are summarized and papers presented are reprinted. Topics considered in the papers include education, employment, affirmative action, identity, pluralism, Chinese cultural background, teaching of English, cross-cultural situations, development of comprehensive services, problems of Chinese immigrant children, and normalization of U.S. foreign policy as it affects Asian Americans. The conference agenda and listing of participating panelists is appended. (Wi)
Chinese Immigrant Children. Preliminary Report. Monograph No. 5 by Rose Chao( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a comparative study of Chinese elementary school children who are recent immigrants to the United States. The purpose of the study is to investigate the adjustment process of these children in the school, in the home, and in the community. The findings are based primarily upon first hand observations, interviews, and the researchers' knowledge about the community. Contrasts are drawn between the life style of Chinese families in Chinatown and those living in Elmhurst, Queens. The financial hardship of the immigration experience is described as being particularly severe for the Chinatown residents. Family problems of Chinese Americans are also described. The issue of language problems and bilingualism in the schools is addressed. Anecdotal information is provided concerning the experiences of immigrant Chinese children in Queens and Chinatown elementary schools. Detailed experiences, based on interviews with Chinese family members, are used to illustrate specific problem areas. (Gc)
Transplanted Chinese children : report to Administration for Children, Youth & Family, Department of Health, Education and Welfare by Betty Lee Sung( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study is to find out what happens in the lives of Chinese immigrant children and youth when they come from the Orient to the United States. The study, confined to New York City immigrants, presents a brief historical background, describes the immigrant experience of family, school and neighborhood, identifies problem areas such as bilingual education, bicultural conflict and gangs, and outlines support systems such as after-school programs and peer groups. The immigrant experience of changing status and roles and social and psychological adjustment are also investigated. Information was obtained from school records and through home visits, participant observation and a survey questionnaire. Findings are summarized at the end of each of 11 chapters. It is concluded that the children in general are doing well academically and exhibit few behavioral problems. The Chinese family is altered by life in the United States; particularly, parental absence is a common feature of the new life. Ethnic community structures and institutions are not equipped to handle the large number of recent immigrants. Policy recommendations are offered. (Author/RH)
The Second National Conference Summary by Carolyn Chai( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this summary of the 1978 National Conference on Asians in America and Asian Americans, conference proceedings, as well as papers and panel discussions, are briefly outlined. Workshops on foreign policy, immigration, Asian identity, education and employment, Indo-Chinese in the United States, teaching English to immigrants, racism and affirmative action, and community development, are discussed in terms of papers presented, ideas examined, and panel participants. Major problems, opportunities, and priorities for Asians in the United States are identified. (Wi)
Developing Comprehensive Services for New York City's Chinese AmericanCommunity by Allen B Cohen( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this paper, the history and activities of the Chinatown Planning Council are described. Formed by individuals in the fields of social service and education, as well as business people and local citizens, the Council set the goal of developing educational and social services for the Chinese Americans in New York's Chinatown as well as for those about to enter the United States as a result of the repeal of the McCarren-Walter Act. The methods used to achieve these goals are outlined in the paper under the headings of employment, day care, the elderly, youth, cultural arts, housing, economic development, research, work in the expanding Chinese Community, uniqueness of the Council's activities, and gaps in service. Each specific activity of the Council centers is explained in terms of the needs it fulfills and the historical reasons for those needs. What emerges is not only a profile of the Council, but a picture of the problems faced by the Chinese American community over the past two decades. (Wi)
"Normalization," U.S. Foreign Policy and Domestic Linkages by James Chieh Hsiung( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this paper, the United States' foreign policy with regard to normalization of relations with mainland China and the implications of various normalization strategies is discussed. Failures in Kissinger's policy (fixation upon super-actors, but neglect of regional powers and the attitude that Taiwan was disposable) are identified. The effects of the Kissinger legacy are described and problems of balancing power in a world consisting of four major groups (advantaged industrial nations, communist nations, rich but developing nations, and the global poor) are examined. The new United States design for foreign policy and normalization is explained as a shift from balancing the Washington, Moscow, Peking triangle to attempting to achieve a West-South alliance. Both the ussr and China are seen as communist rivals of the United States in the Southern Arc. Intermediate powers are perceived as important to the United States in the event of a showdown with a large Communist power. Based on this perception of the Carter administration policy, problems with normalization include a reluctance to meet Peking's demands and a reluctance to abandon Taiwan totally. This impasse over normalization is shown to be a result of the White House's shift in strategic thinking on foreign policy and Peking's stubborness with regard to its conditions. (Author/WI)
A Pluralistic Perspective on Asian American Identities by Franklin J Woo( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Numerous methods of categorization have been devised to define the cultural types of Chinese living in America. However, an understanding of Chinese ethnicity in America is not limited to understanding ethnicity alone, but to how America itself is perceived. The underlying assumption in considering Chinese in America and Chinese-Americans as two separate groups with parallel perceptions of ethnic awareness and experiences, is that America itself is understood to be a changing society. The melting pot concept of ethnic groups being assimilated into a predominantly European-Anglo-Saxon society by giving up their own ethnicity is rejected. What is seen is a new ideal of cultural pluralism which demands ethnic awareness and identity. The unity of the America of the future must be discovered in and through diversity and pluralism. Here Chinese in America and Chinese Americans can help each other to discover the best in Chinese ethnicity in the American multicultural setting. An understanding of history in the broadest possible context of Chinese-American relations can liberate peoples of Chinese origins in America from narrow and inward self perceptions to new horizons and unlimited possibilities of not only ethnic and American, but international and global, awareness and identity. (Author/WI)
Defining Cross-Cultural Situations by Robert N St. Clair( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this essay, the cross cultural conflicts associated with linguistic problems are explored in terms of the development of linguistic theory from 1933 to the present. The linguistic code, positivism, the existential approach to sociolinguistics, linguistic solidarity, defining the situation, language and culture, and cross-cultural conflicts in linguistic expression (Japan and the United States) are discussed. Ideas set forth in the essay include the following: (1) problems of cross-cultural interference are not all related to mismatches between linguistic codes; (2) positivism is inadequate for dealing with problems of a bilingual or bicultural nature; (3) the concept of a completely homogeneous superstructure of linguistic competence is nonexistent; (4) a system of cultural idealism should replace cultural concepts based on elitist or materialistic frameworks; (5) a parallel can be drawn between the role that an official dialect plays in a society and an official ideology provides for a nation; (6) socially transmitted language inferences play a major role in defining the context of a situation; and (7) a social and psychological approach to language in cross-cultural situations is imperative. (Author/WI)
Asians in the Mainstream. Keynote Address by Harry W Low( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In order for Asians to progress in American society, they must commit themselves to total participation in the mainstream of the culture while preserving their own special cultural identity. Asian unity in strategies for civil and cultural advancement at the local level must not become clouded by excessive involvement in international politics. With unity, such as that provided by the Northern California Asian Leadership Council to increase interchange among Asian leaders, the influence and impact of Asians will increase. However, Asians must become less politically apathetic and must involve themselves in elections and in such groups as the Chinese for Affirmative Action and the various Asian professional groups. Asians must also join with other minority groups with similar interests to combat poverty, discrimination, urban problems, legislative injustice, and educational and employment inequalities. Asian groups must make sure that strong affirmative action policies are not only adopted, but also put into effect. Law enforcement, educational opportunities and knowledge of the English language are essential to Asian success as are economic conditions. Asians must learn to exploit favorable economic conditions, such as the developing trade in the Pacific Basin. However, successful Asians must be sure not to exploit or oppress other members of Asian communities, but rather, must use their influence to advance the status of all Asians in the United States. (Wi)
Chinese Thought and Chinese Language: Effects on Students' Writings by Nancy Duke S Lay( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Because the conceptual and grammatical constructions of English and Chinese vary drastically, Chinese students often have difficulty learning to think and write in English. Cultural conflicts of young Chinese in America compound their difficulties with the English language. The old values expressed by Chinese affect students' abilities to write clearly in English. Belief in the value of life, learning, and self reliance is central to Chinese thought. Writing topics for students involving these subjects should be considered. Using the Chinese idea of the yin/yang concept, teachers can introduce analogies and comparisons as methods for teaching composition. Because of the different structure of the Chinese language, the importance of articles, prepositions, and conjunctions in English should be emphasized. These and other suggestions for improving Chinese student's writing are made in this paper. (Wi)
A New American Ideal: Unity Through Pluralism by Philip H Park( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Racial pluralism can serve as the basis on which ethnic diversity and the concept of an American unity can come together. Pluralism can take into consideration the present revival of ethnic identity in all ethnic communities including the Asian American. It can also deal with the issue of American identity in the midst of burgeoning ethnic sensitivity. Asian American history is characterized by attempts to exclude Asians from full participation in the society (immigration exclusion acts, miscegenation laws), acts of violence (such as the imprisonment of Japanese-Americans in concentration camps), and the ongoing influences of the larger society. By creating a new ethnic identity within the American context, Asians, like other ethnic groups, have gained a sense of self affirmation and a strong community identity. However Asians must not let the new ethnicity exclude them from the unifying factors of American life and experience. Through racial pluralism, Asian Americans can achieve three major goals: (1) a basis on which they can deal with the whole of society from their own experiences and insights; (2) a means of creating a just society; and (3) power to build an inclusive society in which the educational, economic and political opportunities are open to all. (Author/WI)
Teaching of English to Asians by Daniel P Hendricksen( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this essay, the relationship of American linguistic theory to teaching English as a second language (esl) is traced over the past few decades. The limitations of the structuralist paradigm in a language learning situation are discussed. The use of pattern drills based on the structuralist surface feature attention to word placement. The pre-Chomskyan notion of language learning as habit formation is criticized. Discreet point testing is seen as a somewhat distorted measure of language competency. The effect of Chomsky's Tranformational-Generative grammar on esl is examined. The contrastive analysis hypothesis and the markedness differential hypothesis are outlined. Major revisions within the transformational camp in the late 1960s and early 1970s are defined in terms of their effects on language learning. Several specific problems of Asians in esl situations are identified. The importance of asking the right questions about language teaching methodologies and linguistic theories is stressed. (Author/WI)
 
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