WorldCat Identities

Indiana Univ., Bloomington Department of Special Education

Overview
Works: 12 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 34 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Bloomington Indiana Univ.
An effective interface between regular & special education : a synopsis of issues and successful practices by Barbara Elliott( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This information packet attempts to identify issues in the interface between special and regular education and to highlight positive examples of regular education/special education cooperative action. A discussion of issues in the regular/special education relationship focuses on role relationships between regular and special education administrators at both the building and central office levels and notes the lack of consensus concerning role changes. The next section presents a rationale for restructuring regular and special education into a more unified educational system and identifies major issues which cluster around categorization, mainstreaming, instructional practices, and funding. Principles of developing an ideal interface between the two systems are identified, focusing on leadership and a shared commitment to education of students with disabilities. The remainder of the paper examines 10 sets of examplary practices selected from sites nationwide. The practices fall into five areas: (1) identification, (2) referral, (3) instruction/intervention, (4) evaluation, and (5) staff development. Examples are drawn from Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, California, Washington, North Carolina, Maine, and Connecticut. Appendices include the following: a paper by Lee J. Gruenwald and Ruth Loomis titled "Evolving Organizational Structures in Special Education: The Madison Example"; forms for referral; forms for identifying exemplary special education programs; and a summary of Project read data. (Contains 60 references.) (Db)
Position Responsibilities and Relationships in the Evaluation of District Level Special Education Administrators. A Review of Position Descriptions, Performance Evaluation Instruments, and Research Regarding the Job Responsibilities and Performance Evaluation of District Level Special Education Administrators. CASE Information Dissemination Packet by Carl A Lashley( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Intended to assist local school districts in developing personnel standards and evaluation procedures for district-level special education administrators, this document begins by summarizing aspects of the evaluation of special education administrators. The document is then organized into areas of responsibility, with corresponding outcomes and specific evaluation statements for each area. Responsibility areas were developed from a review of the literature and evaluation documents, and include the following: advocacy; policy and planning; leadership; compliance management; fiscal management; human resources management; curriculum, instruction, and related services; community relations; improving the educational process; and promoting growth/self actualization. Responsibility areas generally include 2 to 5 outcomes and 3 to 10 evaluation statements. A sample evaluation format is also included. (Contains 8 references.) (Db)
Collaboration : research and practice by Cassandra Mccrory Cole( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this information packet for special education administrators, the literature on collaboration between regular and special educators is reviewed, issues relative to the implementation of collaboration are discussed, and eight model sites are described. After an introduction, distinctions between collaboration and consultation are drawn. Key principles of collaboration (complementary instruction, team teaching, and supportive learning activities) are considered, as are benefits of collaborative teaching (E.G., utilization of complementary teaching strengths) and potential barriers (interpersonal problems, traditional school structures, traditional attitudes regarding the dual systems of special and general education, and administrative mandates which violate the essential voluntariness of collaboration). The following issues in program development and implementation are specifically addressed: (1) time, (2) grading, (3) individualized education programs, (4) staff development, (4) curriculum accommodation and instructional modification, (5) teacher education programs, (6) reform issues, and (7) funding. Finally, programs at the following locations are described: Bakersfield (Vermont); Bloomington (Indiana); Redmond (Washington); Boulder (Colorado); Holt (Michigan); Littleton (Colorado); Albuquerque (New Mexico); and Gaithersburg (Maryland). Appendices include: a listing of responsibilities of both regular and special educators; definitions of various integration models; a sample format for integration model contracts; and sample elementary report card formats. (Contains 46 references.) (Db)
Local interagency councils for preschool handicapped programs : an effective strategy to implement the mandate by Janet L Morgan( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This information packet is designed to assist local interagency councils to implement Public Law 99-457's requirements concerning the provision of high quality services to preschool children with disabilities and their families. The model described provides a framework for continual coordination of agency programs as well as use of collaboration for problem solving. It is designed to structure the independent but similar functions of various agencies, eliminate fragmentation and duplication of services, allow for more effective utilization of personnel and resources, ensure the provision of a full array of services, streamline the service delivery system for families, and eliminate the sense of territoriality that often plagues services to children. The document reviews the goals and rationale for a local interagency council, states prerequisites for effective interagency efforts, describes the critical characteristics of a council, examines the maturation or developmental stages of a council, discusses implementation procedures for assembling the interagency team, and outlines the main functions and activities which result in effective collaboration. An appendix briefly outlines four case studies, which examine the advantages of collaboration for the agencies, the child, and the family. (Contains 50 references.) (JDD)
Parent involvement in the special education process : a synopsis of exemplary models by Margaret Lewis( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document describes eight models of local and state special education efforts that are providing viable ways for parents to become more involved in their children's education. The models are designed to develop effective two-way communication and collaboration between parents and teachers, develop methods for parents to actively support their children's learning in partnership with the school staff, develop methods by which the educational staff may provide ongoing support for parents, develop methods for staff to involve parents in program improvement efforts, and develop an ongoing parent training program. The models include two preschool programs, one a district-wide program in Seattle, Washington, and the second a building-level attempt in Southwick, Massachusetts. The next three models are district/state-wide programs that cover the entire kindergarten to grade 12 spectrum, in Nebraska, Connecticut, and San Diego (California). The sixth model describes a transitional program in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, to help students bridge the gap between the sheltered world of school to the less structured world of work. The seventh model is a parent-helping-parent program that extends across Minnesota and focuses upon the establishment of coalitions for providing more effective communication between parents, special needs children, and the school. The eighth model describes a parent communication network at the local school level in South Bend, Indiana. (Contains 20 references.) (JDD)
The Principal's Blue Book on Special Education. Part I : Administrators & the Law Governing Students with Disabilities. Revised by Martha M McCarthy( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This guide for principals examines legal principles guiding public school administrators in their relations with students. It reviews students' rights and administrators' responsibilities in general and then addresses federal and state statutory mandates that afford additional protections to students with disabilities. The section on students' rights and administrators' responsibilities discusses due process, equal protection, first amendment protections, and administrator liability. The section on rights of children with disabilities explores: identification of children with disabilities; procedural safeguards; right to appropriate educational programs; and application of school policies to students with disabilities in connection with disciplinary practices, testing programs, graduation requirements, interscholastic sports, and students' records. (Contains 83 footnotes.) (Jdd)
Inservice Education-Staff Development. CASE Information Dissemination Packet by Cynthia L Kolenko( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This information packet is intended to provide special education administrators with information and materials regarding inservice education and staff development. The first section presents a research and development model based on Project tamec (Technical Assistance for Mainstreaming Exceptional Children), a North Carolina program which assists regular education personnel in working with students having mild handicaps. The second section presents seven "best practices" models, focusing on building-based programs and networking systems. Each listing discusses the target population; a program description; the process for evaluation, analysis, or renewal; adoption requirements; funding requirements; materials available; and a contact person. The final section focuses on structuring inservice and staff development programs. This section presents a total of 30 abstracts divided into 5 topical areas: (1) design models for inservice; (2) building-based inservice for integration; (3) strategies for rural inservice; (4) strategies for vocational inservice; and (5) references and resources for inservice. (Db)
Instructional supervision in special education : integrating teacher effectiveness research into model supervisory practices by David Zadnik( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document reviews the attributes of instructional effectiveness and supervisory practices in special education and examines the extent to which these attributes and practices are used as criterion measures for supervising instruction. The document prescribes and recommends exemplary practices that supervisors in special education ought to engage in to effectively supervise special education instruction. The first section reviews research on teacher effectiveness, identifying teacher competencies that can be used to assist in designing criteria and standards for supervising special education instructional personnel. The first section also reviews research on effective supervisory processes. The second section describes the current status of supervision of instruction in special education programs. An analysis is conducted on a sample of special education supervisory and evaluative instruments and processes to determine whether these instruments and processes contain effective components. The third section identifies and describes selected exemplary models and practices currently in use in local special education programs. Lastly, the document presents implications for supervisory personnel on the effective supervision of instruction. An appendix provides copies of five exemplary supervision models and observation instruments. (Contains 25 references.) (Jdd)
The Principal's Blue Book on Special Education. Part II : Principal Instructional Leadership and Supervisory Practices in Special Education Programs by Leonard C Burrello( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This guide is designed to assist principals in the supervision of special education programs in their schools. The first of seven papers, by Ann Schnepf and Linda DeClue, offers a general overview of supervisory practices pertaining to special education. Subsequent papers review specific categories of students with disabilities and the supervision of special education programs for those students. They include: "Learning Disabilities" (George Van Horn and Linda DeClue); "Emotional Disabilities" (George Van Horn); "Substantial Disabilities" (George Van Horn); "Physical Disabilities" (Ronald DiOrio); "Communication Disabilities" (L. Annette Carter and Elizabeth McCrea); and "Sensory Disabilities" (Ronald DiOrio). Each paper follows generally the same format, outlining program objectives, components of a quality program, definition of the disabling condition, identifying characteristics, best educational practices in relation to that disability; role of regular and special education teachers, what a principal should look for in a classroom for students with that disability, needs for related services and transportation services, and references. An appendix contains an outline of the key provisions of Public Law 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act). (Jdd)
The Team Concept in Special Education. CASE Information Dissemination Packet by Janice M Brown( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This information packet for special education administrators addresses the team concept as a means of providing special education services at the local school level to mainstreamed students with mild handicaps and provides examples of such programs. In the first three sections, major purposes and goals of teams are reviewed, including provision of inservice training, direct teacher assistance, and improvement of student support systems. Five documents in the fourth section present examples of common team concepts and actual programs. These include: "Teacher Assistance Teams: a Model for Within-Building Problem Solving" (James C. Chalfant and others); "Breaking Down Classroom Walls: Establishing Building Based Teams" (Gil Bushey and Lynn Baker); "Building Support Teams" (Mike Horvath); "Building Team Guide" from Grand Rapids (Michigan) Public Schools; and the section on Student Support Teams from "Educational Planning for Handicapped Students--Procedures Manual" of the Minneapolis (Minnesota) Public Schools. Finally, six federal projects and programs related to the team concept are summarized, including name of a contact person, location, title, program description, and major objectives. (Db)
Input Organizational Strategies of Educable Mentally Retarded and Normal Boys in Free Recall Verbal Learning by Merrill C Sitko( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To investigate organizational strategies of educable mentally retarded (emr) and normal boys, the performance of 30 normal boys (mean iq 105.1) and 30 emr boys (mean iq 69.9), ages 7-12 years, was compared on various free recall learning tasks. Three measures of input organization employed were category clustering, associative clustering, and subjective organization. Subjects were presented with five stimulus lists of 12 words each, and were given 12 trials on each list. Results showed that emr boys demonstrated less category clustering and recall than normal boys on the categorized list, and less associative clustering and recall on a stimulus list composed of high-associative paradigmatic noun pairs. Difference in recall between the groups on a stimulus list of high-associative syntagmatic word pairs was significantly less than the difference in recall on a list of high-associative paradigmatic noun pairs. Emr boys also exhibited significantly less recall than normal boys on stimulus lists of low-associative paradigmatic and low-associative syntagmatic word pairs. (Author/KW)
Locus and Control and Achievement in Middle Class and Lower Class Children by Nettie R Bartel( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A locus of control measure was administered to 431 lower and middle class children in grades one, two, four and six. Subjects did not differ significantly from each other on locus of control in grades one and two, but by fourth and sixth grades the differences had reached significance. Correlations between locus of control and achievement were generally positive for both lower and middle class children. Results were interpreted in terms of the social control function served by the public schools. (Author)
 
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