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Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped

Overview
Works: 74 works in 76 publications in 1 language and 134 library holdings
Classifications: LC4015,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped Indiana Univ.
Oral Reading Observation System Observer's Training Manual by Mary Ella Brady( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A self-instructional program for use by teachers of the handicapped, this training manual was developed to teach accurate coding with the Oral Reading Observation System (OROS)an observation system designed to code teacher-pupil verbal interaction during oral reading instruction. The body of the manual is organized to correspond to the nine categories of oros: target pupil-exact oral reading; target pupil-miscues; look, sound, and meaning teacher prompts; pupil answers to prompts; teacher feedback and management; teacher telling; and nonoral reading or other behaviors not related to oral reading. Each section contains definitions; examples of behavior representing each code; special coding rules, exceptions, and special technical procedures; and exercises for gauging trainee progress. Five appendixes contain definitions of all oros categories, keys for all exercises, general coding techniques, dialect features, and phonics rules and generalizations. The manual is intended for use only by those who have studied the oros "User's Manual" or have been trained by someone familiar with the "User's Manual." (Fl)
Description and Evaluation of the Mainstreaming Modules. FinalReport 48.3 by Keith Brownsmith( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A training package on mainstreaming was field tested with 263 regular and special class teachers and paraprofessionals. The package included a set of structured roleplays and discussion sessions designed for use by untrained workshop managers in a 2- to 3-hour workshop. It was concluded that the training materials are capable of being utilized without special assistance in the field, that the experience of participating in the training sessions is interesting and informative, and that most of the workshops seem to stimulate interest in followup activities on mainstreaming. (Among appended materials are sample questionnaires and a summary of written comments.) (Sbh)
Reading Problems of the Secondary Learning Disabled Student. LdSeries #3 by Patricia H Gillespie( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presented at the Montgomery County (pa) Intermediate Unit Conference on Learning Disabilities in the Secondary Schools, 1975, the paper presents a review of the literature on reading problems of learning disabled secondary students. Aspects covered include identification issues in learning disabilities, models of the reading process and of learning disabilities, assessment in reading, reading characteristics of the learning disabled adolescent, and instructional strategies in reading for the learning disabled. A selected series of studies is presented, showing that most learning disabled children possess reading difficulties, the exact nature of which is not yet clear. Among the conclusions presented are that assessment techniques in reading usually lack validity, reliability, and true diagnostic value; and that reading programing is more developed on the elementary level than on the secondary level. (Dls)
Directory of Cith Training Materials by Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped Indiana Univ.( Book )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The directory of teacher training materials being developed by the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped contains 24 summaries of current projects. Provided for each project are topic, project director, author, target population, general objective, rationale, format, package contents, a general description, approximate time requirements, developmental stage, and evaluation data. The following are examples of described materials: an audiotape and set of color slides to help special education teachers learn to observe and record children's behaviors, a cassette and filmstrip to help teachers enlist the aid of parents as partners in teaching handicapped children, an audiotape and slides to teach principles of affective education, a deck of monster cards to help teachers analyze concepts for instruction, and a programed instruction manual and video tapes to help teachers develop behavior management techniques. (Db)
The Development of Oral Reading Prompting Skills in the Catts-CbteProgram for Pre-Service Teachers of the Mildly Handicapped. FinalReport 53.5 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report describes the operation of a model preservice special education teacher preparation practicum designed from a competency based teacher education frame of reference and utilizing a computer assisted teacher training system (catts). Chapter I provides introductory information (including teacher training objectives) and an explanation of practicum organization (with sections on such program components as physical setting, criteria for trainee and pupil selection, and accountability and assessment techniques). Chapter ii focuses on the Oral Reading Observation System (oros), a research and evaluation tool that enables a trained observer to code teacher and child verbal behaviors during an oral reading activity. Chapter iii, which makes up a major portion of the document, presents five related studies of teacher behavior conducted in conjunction with the catts-oros teacher preparation practicum. Addressed in each study are the subjects, procedures, background of the study, and training interventions, along with the specific treatment or empirical questions. Among the 18 sections of the appendix are sample training manuals, summary of responses to tutor evaluation, lesson plan checklist and form, bibliography of child-use materials, and tabulation of pupil responses to interviews. (Sbh)
A Comparison of the Effect of Self Evaluation Lessons and IncreasedContent of the Prompting Module on Teacher Interactions with HandicappedReaders During Oral Reading. Final Report 11.3 by Mary Ella Brady( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studied with 12 teachers of educable mentally retarded students in intermediate and junior high self-contained classrooms and remedial reading students receiving extra reading instruction were the effects of teacher instructions during oral reading on pupil reading strategies. Teachers were given a self-instructional module on prompting skills for responding to pupil miscues during oral reading. Among findings were that the teachers rated the training as very helpful although they were not able to increase the success rate of their prompts, that many were unable to discriminate between different kinds of prompts, and that there were no differences between variations of the prompting module used. (Im)
Anticipation of Cognitive Behavior of Mentally Retarded and NonretardedChildren. Final Report 16.3 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study attempted to determine the relative accuracy with which 290 college students anticipated the responses of a group of 65 educable mentally retarded (emr) males (11- to 14-years-old) and a group of 66 normal children (10- to 14-years-old). College students were asked to predict responses to emr and normal children to questions designed to emphasize cognitive processes rather than academic skills. Anticipations were analyzed according to the students' sex, academic major, age, hours in special education courses, and experience with emr children. Data, shown in tables which provide detailed statistical analyses, indicated that all groups of college students anticipated the nonretarded children's responses at a reasonable level of accuracy (mean of 13.2 correct answers out of a possible 24), but that none of the groups correctly anticipated responses of emr Ss at any level of proficiency (mean of 5.5 correct answers out of 24). However, special education majors, students in special education courses, students who had had experience with emr children, oldest students, and females were better than their counterparts in anticipating responses of the emr group. Appendixes provide questions used in preparing the normative data base, tables that indicate responses of the emr and the nonretarded groups, instructions to the college students, and correlation matrices. (Lh)
Evaluating and Providing Feedback on the Effectiveness of Instructionfor Handicapped Children Integrated in Inner-City Secondary Schools. Final Report by Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped Indiana Univ.( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The final report presents a quarter-by-quarter analysis of results in a project designed to develop and implement a microcomputer-based management system for resource room teachers of mainstreamed mildlly handicapped secondary students. Information was to consist of updated daily records of instructional activities and of the individual student program in each subject area in both regular and resource classes. Quarterly reports address site development activities, computer systems information, data collection and analysis tasks, and computer software information. Teachers had access to an individualized education program system which enhanced daily lesson planning, and were trained to use two software programs: a reading assessment and progress evaluation program and a math assessment and tutorial program. Among major findings were that teachers were able to record and monitor student academic performances via microcomputers; that teachers readily accepted and used certain non-time consuming software programs; and that a math achievement software program contributed to significant achievement improvement of mildly handicapped middle school students. (Cl)
The Philadelphia Open Classroom Project. Technical Report 24.2 by Nettie R Bartel( Book )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As part of an ongoing study of handicapped children in the open classroom, 12 children (in grades k through 4) were observed who had been identified by their teachers as either benefiting most or least from open class instruction. The literature review of the entire study focused on the critical variables (teachers' roles, individual differences, and individualized instruction) involved in using the open classroom for special education. In the experiment reported, Ss behavior over 5 hours was classified as either academic vs. Nonacademic; amount of time spent with teachers, peers, or alone; and positive vs. Negative interactions. It was found that Ss spent more time in nonacademic activities than academic, alone and with peers than with teachers, and in positive interactions. Preliminary findings of the entire study suggested that, in comparison to instruction in traditional classrooms, considerably more peer helping takes place in the open classroom; younger or poor achieving children are learning incidentally considerable material in the open classroom that is presented to older children; younger children in the open classroom engage in activities usually associated with older children; and teachers seem to perceive less deviant behavior and less under-achievement in the open classroom, leading to fewer referrals for psychological examinations, testing, and special class placement. (Graphs are provided to illustrate statistical data from the research project.) (Sb)
A Model for Delivery of Services via Case Conference Process. LdSeries #6 by Herbert J., Jr Rieth( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A model for the delivery of services to learning disabled children which provides procedures for services in the least restrictive environment through professional and parental participation is described. It is explained that the components of the model are the referral system, the case conference (where the decision is made regarding the necessity for services and the type of services, the number and type of personnel involved, and the environment where the services will be delivered), and the individualized educational plan (composed of program objectives, implementation procedures, and evaluation procedures). Included is a model individualized educational plan developed in accordance with the provisions in P.L. 94-142 (Education for All Handicapped Children Act). (Bd)
The Effectiveness of a Computer-Assisted Teacher Training System (Catts)in the Development of Reading and Listening Comprehension InstructionalStrategies of Preservice Special Education Trainees in a TutorialClassroom Setting. Final Report 53.4 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Described is a project which relates psycholinguistic processes (reading and listening comprehension) of handicapped children to the training needs of special education teachers through the application of Computer-Assisted Teacher Training System technology in performance based teacher education. The first chapter discusses preservice special education and presents the nine objectives of the project. Chapter 2 reviews the literature and considers implications and conclusions relating to the following topics: interactive teaching behaviors and reading and listening comprehension, language strategies of retarded children, reading studies involving educable mentally handicapped children, reading comprehension and organization in the retarded. Chapter 3 describes the methods used in the project observation system, training materials, coder training, and coder competencies evaluation; tutor background, practicum objectives and tutoring procedures; and teaching phases and experimental design). The results of the project (including 11 tables) are discussed in chapter 4. Chapter 5 summarizes the project in terms of objectives, perspective, methods, data sources, and results, and draws conclusions about the effectiveness of the project. (Bd)
Project Steel. a Special Project to Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Final Report. Executive Summary by Theodore W Frick( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The document presents the executive summary of the final report of Project steel (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory), a 3-year study at Indiana University. Project steel achieved four major goals: (1) development, implementation, and evaluation of a microcomputer-based observation system for codification, storage, and summarization of special education trainees' classroom teaching performances; (2) development, field testing, and evaluation of computer literacy training procedures and materials for preservice and inservice special education teachers; (3) development, implementation, and evaluation of a computer-based testing system for assessing teacher knowledge; and (4) development and preliminary evaluation of a computer-based information management system for storing and retrieving data on special education teachers' performances during their preservice training program. The report concludes that the microcomputer-based observation and feedback system was clearly effective in altering teacher behavior, that the computer literacy training modules developed are an effective instructional package, that the computer-based testing system can help college instructors assess students' acquisition of cognitive objectives, and that the computer-based information management system provides an efficient and secure method for total program evaluation. (Db)
Anticipation of Cognitive Behavior of Mentally Retarded and Normal Children by Candace S Garrett( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study attempted to determine the relative accuracy with which 290 college students anticipated the responses of a group of 65 educable mentally retarded (emr) males (11- to 14-years-old) and a group of 66 normal children (10- to 14-years-old). Anticipations were analyzed according to the students' sex, academic major, age, hours in special education courses, and experience with emr children. Data indicated that all groups of college students anticipated the nonretarded children's responses at a reasonable level of accuracy (mean of 13.2 correct answers out of a possible 24), but that none of the groups correctly anticipated responses of emr Ss at any level of proficiency (mean of 5.5 correct answers out of 24). However, special education majors, students in special education courses, students who had had experience with emr children, oldest students, and females were better than their counterparts in anticipating responses of the emr group. It was found that graduate special education majors did not anticipate more accurately than undergraduate majors, and that students who had taken two or three special education courses anticipated emr responses as poorly as students with no special education background. Findings were thought to show that students are oversensitized to the differences between emr and nonretarded children to such an extent that their anticipations of emr responses are as poor as those of students without special training. (Gw)
The Role of the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped inProject Prime. (Programmed Reentry into Mainstream Education by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Described is the role of the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped (cith) in Project prime (Programmed Reentry into Mainstream Education), which attempted to assess the efficacy of mainstreaming for 1,035 emotionally disturbed, educable mentally retarded, and language/learning disabled Texas pupils in grades 3-5. The behavior categories of four classroom observation systems used in the project to record types of behavior management, levels of cognitive demand, amount of pupil participation, and quality of classroom climate are outlined. Details are given on the development and contents of training packages for the observation systems (which include audio and video tapes). Procedures are explained for training 528 observers, for maintaining quality control, and for assessing reliability during observer training. Appendixes include time records of cith personnel, and the observations of a workshop trainer. (Ls)
The Effects of Catts' Feedback in a Preservice Special Education TeacherTraining Program. Final Report 53.32 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of Computer-Assisted Teacher Training System (catts) feedback in a preservice special education teacher training program are discussed. It is explained that a series of studies were conducted to test the efficacy of catts feedback in effecting teacher trainees' acquisition and performance of specific teaching skills. Chapter 1 presents the goals and objectives of the project, an overview of the project (pilot procedures, descrimination training, laboratory classroom design, trainee evaluation), and describes both the organization of the catts project and an overview of catts itself (teaching station, observation coding station, analysis-encoding station). Chapter 2 deals with the two observation systems used for feedback of teacher and student behaviors to trainees, cog-strat (focused on teacher and student cognitive styles of interaction) and man-strat (focused on student on- and off-task behavior and strategies of teacher management of student behavior), and discusses such areas as observer training and evaluation of observer competencies. Such aspects of project organization and implementation as teacher education laboratory classrooms, implementation procedures (teaching and coding), scheduling observation and teachers, and the effects of feedback on trainee behaviors are studied in chapter 3. Chapter 4 summarizes the results of the study which revealed that all trainees significantly increased their rate of criterion performance as a function of catts feedback. The summary and conclusions of the project are presented in the final chapter. (Bd)
Computer-Based Information Management System. Project Steel. a Special Project to Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume Iv. Final Report by Theodore W Frick( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The document is part of the final report on Project steel (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the fourth of four project objectives, the development and preliminary evaluation of a computer-based management system. The steel Information Management System maintains three primary types of information bases on students enrolled in the undergraduate special education (mildly handicapped) program at Indiana University: (1) demographic information; (2) observational data collected in field experience situations; and (3) test performance obtained using the steel computer-based testing system. The system was developed using Scientific Information Retrieval database management software. Each student is individually identified and all data records linked to that individual's case identification number. Student information is accessed through currently developed functions designed for faculty use. Sample functions include: accessing the mail system, adding observation data to the student database, updating a student profile, and summarizing a student's observation data. A typical user interaction session is also provided. (Author/DB)
An Analysis of the Impact of Instructional Time within Different Service Delivery Systems on the Academic Achievement of Mildly Handicapped Children. Final Report by Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped Indiana Univ.( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This final report describes a 3-year project which investigated the relationship between academic learning time (alt) and achievement in reading and mathematics of mildly handicapped students within the context of different special education delivery systems. Subjects were 24 educably mentally retarded, learning disabled, and emotionally disturbed students, aged 7-13 years, in grades 1-5. During the first one and a half years, descriptive data were collected to determine the amount and kinds of alt to provide. During the last one and a half years, interventions based on the results were carried out and evaluated. The relationship of increased direct instruction to increased academic engagement was reported as the most dramatic overall alt finding. Section 1 of the document consists of the text of a teacher's manual summarizing the research findings and suggesting strategies for increasing alt and student academic achievement. Sections 2, 3, and 4 present a review of the literature, a summary description of project activities and methodology, and results and discussion. In section 5, conclusions and limitations are discussed, and questions for further research are posed. Appendices include: (1) Academic Learning Time Observation System (altos) coding forms; (2) altos Observer Reference Manual; (3) altos Reference Manual for Teacher Logs; (4) sample teacher printout and directions; and (5) source listing of basic programs. (Jw)
The Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Resource Teachers' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Attitudes Toward Consultation. Final Report by Bloomington. Center for Innovation in Teaching theHandicapped Indiana Univ.( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A questionnaire on the consultation role of resource teachers was developed and administered to 192 resource teachers, 236 regular education classroom teachers, and 214 principals. The scale incorporated questions on attitudes and competence of resource teachers as well as on potential problems interfering with consultation. In addition, resource teachers and principals estimated the amount of time spent on various school duties, with recommendations for time allocation. Analysis of responses across professional roles revealed small but significant differences in attitudes toward consultation. Attitudes toward consultation tended to be neutral or undecided. Overall, resource teachers were rated as somewhat skilled in consultation tasks. The major problem identified for consultation programs was time for teachers to meet other problems included in inadequate training and lack of administrative support. Resource teachers and principals estimated that 7.5% of the resource teachers' time is allotted to consultation, noting that the time should be increased to 10.5%. Appendices include the questionnaires for the three subject groups, a description of interviews with resource teachers and a description of a prototype workshop on consultation, as well as respondents' comments, demographic information, and numerous tables. (Cl)
Design, Development, and Validation of Anticipation Games. WorkingPaper 16.14 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discussed is the development of games which provide teacher-trainees with experience in anticipating the response of different types of handicapped children to different tasks, and reported are results of four studies evaluating the effects of such games. It is explained that the games are designed to improve understanding of students and that they provide immediate feedback based on empirical data. The process of developing anticipation games is described in three stages: analyzing people and situation, collecting normative data, and choosing a game format. Summarized are studies which investigated questions such as how accurately different groups of college students anticipated educable mentally retarded and nonretarded children's responses to a set of questions. (Ls)
The Improvement of Social Status Among Rejected Pupils Through theModification of Teacher Behavior Using the Computer-Assisted TeacherTraining System (Catts): An Inservice Training Application of Catts. Final Report 53.6 by Melvyn I Semmel( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study involving 16 elementary school teachers and 32 low social status children was conducted to improve the social status of target classrooms through the implementation of an "in situ" Computer Assisted Teacher Training System (catts) intervention. During the treatment phase, teachers in Group 1 (n=8) received 12 catts post-session feedback opportunities in the format of hardcopy computer printouts, which were profiles of the teacher interactions with low-status children. Teachers in Group 2 (n=8) received only seven sessions with catts post-session hardcopy computer printout feedback. At the end of the study, posttest sociometric measures were administered to all children. Data revealed that teachers in both groups increased their frequency of giving positive reinforcement and asking questions in the classroom as a result of the catts data phone intervention. Results also showed that the low-status pupils increased in their classroom interactions from baseline to treatment phases. (Appended materials include instructions for sociometric testing, information on reading the computer feedback printout, and the Indiana Interaction Index categories and definitions.) (Author/SBH)
 
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English (21)