WorldCat Identities

Information Technology Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 580 works in 620 publications in 1 language and 741 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Academic theses 
Classifications: T58.5,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Information Technology Laboratory (U.S.)
Technical accomplishments by Information Technology Laboratory (National Institute of Standards and Technology)( )

in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Methods used in tieback wall design and construction to prevent local anchor failure, progressive anchorage failure, and ground mass stability failure by Ralph W Strom( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simplified procedures for the design of tall, flexible anchored tieback walls by Robert M Ebeling( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Monitoring of Marseilles Dam submersible gates, Illinois River, Illinois( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Instrumentation at the National Center for Asphalt Technology test track by Reed B Freeman( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Information Technology Laboratory( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advanced Network Technologies Division--Software Diagnostics and Conformance Testing Division--Statistical Engineering Division--Computer Security Division--Mathematical and Computational Sciences Division--High Performance Systems & Services Division--Information Access and User Interfaces Division--Distributed Computing and Information Services Division--Office of Enterprise Integration
Extended load/unload/reload hyperbolic model for interfaces : parameter values and model performance for the contact between concrete and coarse sand by Jesus E Gomez( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The extended hyperbolic model for interfaces developed by Gomez, Filz, and Ebeling (Technical Report ITL-99-1; Report 2) can model the response of interfaces subjected to complex stress paths that may include simultaneous changes in shear and normal stresses and unloading-reloading. These types of loading can occur at soil-structure interfaces of multi-anchored systems used in navigation projects. Therefore, it is possible that finite element analyses of multi-anchored systems can be performed that incorporate the extended hyperbolic model for interfaces. Performance of the model is excellent for interfaces between fine sands and concrete. However, the model has not been evaluated against the results of shear tests between coarse sand and concrete. In this investigation, a number of interface tests between coarse sand and concrete were performed. Comparisons were made between the calculated and measured interface response. These comparisons show that the extended hyperbolic model is also accurate for this type of interface and, therefore, that it can be used for a large variety of interfaces between granular soils and concrete
Fragility analysis of concrete gravity dams by Paulos B Tekie( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concrete gravity dams are an important part ofthe nation's infrastructure. Many dams have been in service for over 50 years, during which time important advances in the methodologies for evaluation of natural phenomena hazards have caused the design-basis events to be revised upwards, in some cases significantly. Many existing dams fail to meet these revised safety criteria and structural rehabilitation to meet newly revised criteria may be costly and difficult. A probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) provides a rational safety assessment and decision-making tool managing the various sources of uncertainty that may impact dam performance. Fragility analysis, which depicts fl%e uncertainty in the safety margin above specified hazard levels, is a fundamental tool in a PSA. This study presents a methodology for developing fragilities of concrete gravity dams to assess their performance against hydrologic and seismic hazards. Models of varying degree of complexity and sophistication were considered and compared. The methodology is illustrated using the Bluestone Dam on the New River in West Virginia, which was designed in the late 1930's. The hydrologic fragilities showed that the Eluestone Dam is unlikely to become unstable at the revised probable maximum flood (PMF), but it is likely that there will be significant cracking at the heel ofthe dam. On the other hand, the seismic fragility analysis indicated that sliding is likely, if the dam were to be subjected to a maximum credible earthquake (MCE). Moreover, there will likely be tensile cracking at the neck of the dam at this level of seismic excitation. Probabilities of relatively severe limit states appear to be only marginally affected by extremely rare events (e.g. the PMF and MCE). Moreover, the risks posed by the extreme floods and earthquakes were not balanced for the Bluestone Dam, with seismic hazard posing a relatively higher risk
Smeared and discrete crack evaluations of a lock exhibiting earth pressure-induced cracking by Robert M Ebeling( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report discusses the results of an evaluation of crack initiation and propagation at Snell Lock, one of the locks constructed on the St. Lawrence Seaway during 1956 and 1957. The rock-founded, unreinforced concrete gravity lock walls of Snell Lock experienced cracking as a result of earth loading in excess of those anticipated during structural design. The objective of this study is to appraise two analytical procedures used to evaluate the potential for and/or the extent of cracking within massive concrete structures. The two analytical procedures available for analyzing hydraulic structures that may exhibit cracking during loading are based on either the smeared crack theory or the discrete crack theory. The smeared crack theory uses a strength-of-materials approach to evaluate crack initiation potential and/or crack propagation in a material. A linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) discrete crack analysis is used to assess if a discrete crack will propagation or arrest for a given increment of loading. Generally, LEFM relate the stress magnitude and distribution at the crack tip to the nominal stress applied to the structure; to the size, shape, and orientation of the crack or discontinuity; and to the material properties. The demand due to loading(s) applied to the retaining structure and specifically to the region of cracking is represented by stress intensity factors. The capacity of the material is characterized by the fracture toughness
State of the practice in the design of tall, stiff, and flexible tieback retaining walls by Ralph W Strom( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In tieback wall design, the determination of anchor loads and wall forces requires knowledge about the interaction between the wall and the soil during successive stages of excavation, as well as after completion of the project. Interaction between the wall and soil is difficult to predict. As a result, simple methods of analysis have been developed for use in the design of various tieback wall systems. These methods may, or may not, require a construction sequencing analysis. This report describes state-of-the-practice analytical methods used to evaluate tieback wall performance and to design the tieback wall and ground anchor system. Analytical methods include equivalent beam on rigid support methods, beam on elastic foundation methods, and finite element methods. The applicability of the various design methods with respect include vertical sheet-pile systems, solider beam systems with wood or concrete lagging, secant cylinder pile systems, reinforced concrete slurry wall systems, and slurry wall systems constructed using soldier beams and concrete lagging. Analysis methods depend on whether the tieback wall system is stiff or flexible. The report describes the characteristics of stiff and flexible tieback wall systems and indicates how the analysis method selected can be influenced by wall stiffness
Simplified procedures for the design of tall, stiff tieback walls by Ralph W Strom( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PT123 : a multi-dimensional particle tracking computer program : version 1.0( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of pool drawdown and wing dams (Pool 8), and closure dams (Pool 13), on navigation channel sedimentation processes, Upper Mississippi River( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Construction of navigation locks and dams on the upper Mississippi River about 60 years ago submerged wing dam training structures, thereby reducing their effectiveness and increasing secondary channel and floodplain conveyance. The U.S. Army Engineer District, St. Paul, executed a drawdown of Pool 8 (upstream of Lock and Dam No. 8) near La Crosse, WI, during the summers of 2001 and 2002. Water levels were allowed to drop below normal minimum values to expose mud flats, promote seed germination, and benefit fish and wildlife. By lowering water levels during a drawdown, wing dam training structures submergence and floodplain conveyance will be decreased, and flow patterns around the training structures will be altered. This could result in sediment mobilization and scour in the navigation channel. During the spring of 2001, three closure dams were constructed in Pool 13 (upstream of Lock and Dam No. 13) by the U.S. Army Engineer District, Rock Island, near Savannah, IL. These closure dams are actually submerged weirs that should allow water to continue to flow into the backwater areas of the islands of Pool 13, but at reduced rates. At issue is whether the main channel might require reduced dredging in future years as a result of the construction of the closure dams and, also, whether the backwaters of the eastern side of the islands will fill with sediment
Physical data collection for lock wall deterioration by Robert C Patev( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A multifaceted study was performed as part of the Upper Mississippi River Illinois Waterways Navigation Study (UMR-IWW) to gather unknown or previously estimated data to assist with studying the deterioration and loss of concrete from lock walls. This effort revolved around physically monitoring barge traffic in lock chambers with time-lapse video equipment as well as measuring the actual losses from lock wall surfaces to determine the critical parameters needed for the model. Time-lapse videotape equipment was installed at three lock chambers in the UMR-IWW navigation area. The physical data collected from the videotapes assisted with determining barge velocities, the number of barge impacts on lock walls, chamber pool fluctuations, and the general operating characteristics of locks during the winter months. Measurements of lock walls were also made at four lock chambers to determine the depth of deterioration and typical deterioration patterns that exist at each lock. From this information, a model to predict the deterioration of concrete in lock chambers can be developed and implemented
Theoretical manual for pile foundations by Reed L Mosher( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This theoretical manual for pile foundations describes the background and research and the applied methodologies used in the analysis and design of pile foundations. This research was developed through the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center by the Computer-Aided Structural Engineering (CASE) Project. Several of the procedures have been implemented in the CASE Committee computer programs CAXPILE, CPGA, and COM624. Theoretical development of these engineering procedures and discussions of the limitations of each method are presented
Mesh-independent methods for agent movement by Jing-Ru C Cheng( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Efficient and accurate methods are needed to move agents (particles with behavior rules) through their environments. To support such applications, this paper presents a compact software architecture that can be used to interface parallel particle tracking software to computational mesh management systems. The in-element particle tracking framework supported by this software architecture is presented in detail. The framework supports most particle tracking applications. The use of this parallel software architecture is illustrated through the implementation of two differential equation solvers, the forward Euler method and an implicit trapezoidal method, on a distributed, unstructured, computational mesh. A design goal of this software effort has been to interface to software libraries such as Scalable Unstructured Mesh Algorithms and Applications (SUMAA3d) in addition to application codes (e.g., FEMWATER). This goal is achieved through a software architecture that specifies a lightweight functional interface that maintains the full functionality required by particle-mesh methods. The use of this approach in parallel programming environments written in C and Fortran is demonstrated
Risk analysis of design-improvement alternatives to the Lindy Claiborne Boggs Lock and Dam by Bilal M Ayyub( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dynamic structural flexible-beam response to a moving barge train impact force time-history using Impact_Beam( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deformable Bullnose Energy Absorbing System (BEAS)( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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English (35)