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MITCogNet

Overview
Works: 83 works in 88 publications in 1 language and 1,462 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Handbooks and manuals  History  Methods (Music)  Periodicals 
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Most widely held works by MITCogNet
Handbook of developmental cognitive neuroscience by Charles A Nelson( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,026 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The second edition of an essential resource to the evolving field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, completely revised, with expanded emphasis on social neuroscience, clinical disorders, and imaging genomics.The publication of the second edition of this handbook testifies to the rapid evolution of developmental cognitive neuroscience as a distinct field. Brain imaging and recording technologies, along with well-defined behavioral tasks--the essential methodological tools of cognitive neuroscience--are now being used to study development. Technological advances have yielded methods that can be safely used to study structure-function relations and their development in children's brains. These new techniques combined with more refined cognitive models account for the progress and heightened activity in developmental cognitive neuroscience research. The Handbook covers basic aspects of neural development, sensory and sensorimotor systems, language, cognition, emotion, and the implications of lifelong neural plasticity for brain and behavioral development. The second edition reflects the dramatic expansion of the field in the seven years since the publication of the first edition. This new Handbook has grown from forty-one chapters to fifty-four, all original to this edition. It places greater emphasis on affective and social neuroscience--an offshoot of cognitive neuroscience that is now influencing the developmental literature. The second edition also places a greater emphasis on clinical disorders, primarily because such research is inherently translational in nature. Finally, the book's new discussions of recent breakthroughs in imaging genomics include one entire chapter devoted to the subject. The intersection of brain, behavior, and genetics represents an exciting new area of inquiry, and the second edition of this essential reference work will be a valuable resource for researchers interested in the development of brain-behavior relations in the context of both typical and atypical development
Mindblindness : an essay on autism and theory of mind by Simon Baron-Cohen( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
The analogical mind : perspectives from cognitive science by Dedre Gentner( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analogy has been the focus of extensive research in cognitive science over the past two decades. Through analogy, novel situations and problems can be understood in terms of familiar ones. Indeed, a case can be made for analogical processing as the very core of cognition. This is the first book to span the full range of disciplines concerned with analogy. Its contributors represent cognitive, developmental, and comparative psychology; neuroscience; artificial intelligence; linguistics; and philosophy.The book is divided into three parts. The first part describes computational models of analogy as well as their relation to computational models of other cognitive processes. The second part addresses the role of analogy in a wide range of cognitive tasks, such as forming complex cognitive structures, conveying emotion, making decisions, and solving problems. The third part looks at the development of analogy in children and the possible use of analogy in nonhuman primates.ContributorsMiriam Bassok, Consuelo B. Boronat, Brian Bowdle, Fintan Costello, Kevin Dunbar, Gilles Fauconnier, Kenneth D. Forbus, Dedre Gentner, Usha Goswami, Brett Gray, Graeme S. Halford, Douglas Hofstadter, Keith J. Holyoak, John E. Hummel, Mark T. Keane, Boicho N. Kokinov, Arthur B. Markman, C. Page Moreau, David L. Oden, Alexander A. Petrov, Steven Phillips, David Premack, Cameron Shelley, Paul Thagard, Roger K.R. Thompson, William H. Wilson, Phillip Wolff
The computational brain by Patricia Smith Churchland( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Computational Brain addresses a broad audience: neuroscientists, computer scientists, cognitive scientists, and philosophers. It is written for both the expert and novice. A basic overview of neuroscience and computational theory is provided, followed by a study of some of the most recent and sophisticated modeling work in the context of relevant neurobiological research. Technical terms are clearly explained in the text, and definitions are provided in an extensive glossary. The appendix contains a précis of neurobiological techniques."--Jacket
Computational developmental psychology by Thomas R. (mcgill University) Shultz( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An overview of the emerging discipline of computational developmental psychology, emphasizing the use of constructivist neural networks.Despite decades of scientific research, the core issues of child development remain too complex to be explained by traditional verbal theories. These issues include structure and transition, representation and processing, innate and experiential determinants of development, stages of development, the purpose and end of development, and the relation between knowledge and learning. In this book Thomas Shultz shows how computational modeling can be used to capture these complex phenomena, and in so doing he lays the foundation for a new subfield of developmental psychology, computational developmental psychology.A principal approach in developmental thinking is the constructivist one. Constructivism is the Piagetian view that the child builds new cognitive structures by using current mental structures to understand new events. In this book Shultz features constructivist models employing networks that grow as well as learn. This allows models to implement synaptogenesis and neurogenesis in a way that allows qualitative changes in processing mechanisms. The book's appendices provide additional background on the mathematical concepts used, and a companion Web site contains easy-to-use computational packages
The Asymmetrical Brain( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research on brain asymmetry, with particular emphasis on findings made possible by recent advances in neuroimaging
Lexical representation and process by William Marslen-Wilson( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Part 1 Psychological models of lexical processing: access and integration - projecting sound onto meaning, William Marslen-Wilson; visual word recognition and pronunciation - a computational model and its implications, Mark S. Seidenberg; basic issues in lexical processing, Kenneth I. Forster; lexical access in speech production, Brian Butterworth; the retrieval of phonological forms in production - test of predictions from a connectionist model, Gary S. Dell. Part 2 The nature of the input: review of selected models of speech perception, Dennis H. Klatt; connectionist approaches to acoustic phonetic processing, Jeffrey L. Elman; parafoveal preview effects and lexical access during eye fixations in reading, Keith Rayner and David A. Balota; reading and the mental lexicon - on the uptake of visual information, Derek Besner and James C. Johnston. Part 3 Lexical structure and process: understanding words and word recognition - can phonology help?, Uli H. Frauenfelder and Aditi Lahiri; auditory lexical access - where do we start?, Anne Cutler; on mental representation of morphology and its diagnosis by measures of visual access speed, Leslie Henderson; morphological parsing and the lexicon, Jorge Hankamer; psycholinguistic issues in the lexical representation of meaning, Robert Schreuder and Giovanni B. Flores D'Arcais. Part 4 Parsing and interpretation: the role of lexical representation in language comprehension, Lorraine Komisarjevsky Tyler; grammar, interpretation and processing from the lexicon, Mark J. Steedman; against lexical generation of syntax, Lyn Frazier; lexical structure and language comprehension, Michael K. Tanenhaus and Greg N. Carlson
Sites of vision : the discursive construction of sight in the history of philosophy by David Michael Kleinberg-Levin( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In recent years scholars from many disciplines have become interested in the "construction" of the human senses - in how the human environment shapes both how and what we perceive. Taking a very different approach to the question of construction, Sites of Vision turns to language and explores the ways in which the rhetoric of philosophy has formed the nature of vision and how, in turn, the rhetoric of vision has helped to shape philosophical thought
Queer science : the use and abuse of research into homosexuality by Simon LeVay( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research into homosexuality exemplifies both the promise and the danger of science applied to human nature. LeVay argues that the question of causation should not be the crucial issue in the gay-rights debate, but that science does have an important contribution to make. It can help to demonstrate that the traditional and still prevalent view of homosexuality - as a mere set of behaviors that anyone might show - is inadequate, and that gays and lesbians are in a real sense a distinct group of people within the larger society with a privileged insight into their own natures
Touch by Tiffany Field( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The first sensory input in life comes from the sense of touch while a baby is still in the womb, and touch continues to be the primary means of learning about the world throughout infancy, well into childhood. Touch is critical for children's growth, development, and health, as well as for adults' physical and mental well-being. Yet American society, claims Tiffany Field, is dangerously touch-deprived." "Field, a leading authority on touch and touch therapy, begins this book with an overview of the sociology and anthropology of touching and the basic psychophysical properties of touch. She then reports recent research results on the value of touch therapies, such as massage therapy, for various conditions, including asthma, cancer, autism, and eating disorders. She emphasizes the need for a change in societal attitudes toward touching, particularly among those who work with children."--Jacket
Roots of social sensibility and neural function by Jay Schulkin( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this book Jay Schulkin explores social reason from philosophical, psychological, and cognitive neuroscientific perspectives. He argues for a pragmatist approach, in which the role of experience - that is, interaction with others - is central to any consideration of action in the social world. Unlike some philosophers of mind, Jay Schulkin considers social reason to be a real feature of the information processing system in the brain, in addition to a useful cognitive tool in predicting behavior. Throughout the book, he incorporates neurobiological evidence for a domain-specific system for social cognition." "Topics covered include the centrality of intentional attribution to social cognition, the rise of cognitive science in the twentieth century, the functional arguments for the role of experience, intentional understanding in nonhuman primates, theory of mind and natural kinds in children, autism as a disorder of theory of mind, and the integration of emotions into theory of mind."--Jacket
In critical condition : polemical essays on cognitive science and the philosophy of mind by Jerry A Fodor( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Doing philosophy, according to Jerry Fodor, is like piloting: The trick is to find an object of known position and locate yourself with respect to it. In this book, Fodor contrasts his views about the mind with those of a number of well-known philosophers and cognitive scientists, including John McDowell, Christopher Peacocke, Paul Churchland, Daniel Dennett, Paul Smolensky, and Richard Dawkins. Fodor constructs a version of the representational theory of mind that blends intentional realism, computational reductionism, nativism, and semantic atomism
Models of bounded rationality by Herbert A Simon( )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Offering alternative models based on such concepts as satisficing (acceptance of viable choices that may not be the undiscoverable optimum) and bounded rationality (the limited extent to which rational calculation can direct human behavior), Simon shows concretely why more empirical research based on experiments and direct observation, rather than just statistical analysis of economic aggregates, is needed.Throughout Herbert Simon's wide-ranging career--in public administration, business administration, economics, cognitive psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, and computer science--his central aim has been to explain the nature of the thought processes that people use in making decisions.The third volume of Simon's collected papers continues this theme, bringing together work on this and other economics-related topics that have occupied his attention in the 1980s and 1990s: how to represent causal ordering formally in dynamic systems, the implications for society of new electronic information systems, employee and managerial motivation in the business firm (specifically the implications for economics of the propensity of human beings to identify with the goals of organizations), and the state of economics itself.Offering alternative models based on such concepts as satisficing (acceptance of viable choices that may not be the undiscoverable optimum) and bounded rationality (the limited extent to which rational calculation can direct human behavior), Simon shows concretely why more empirical research based on experiments and direct observation, rather than just statistical analysis of economic aggregates, is needed.The twenty-seven articles, in five sections, each with an introduction by the author, examine the modeling of economic systems, technological change: information technology, motivation and the theory of the firm, and behavioral economics and bounded rationality
Advances in genetic programming( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There is increasing interest in genetic programming by both researchers and professional software developers. These twenty-two invited contributions show how a wide variety of problems across disciplines can be solved using this new paradigm.There is increasing interest in genetic programming by both researchers and professional software developers. These twenty-two invited contributions show how a wide variety of problems across disciplines can be solved using this new paradigm.Advances in Genetic Programming reports significant results in improving the power of genetic programming, presenting techniques that can be employed immediately in the solution of complex problems in many areas, including machine learning and the simulation of autonomous behavior. Popular languages such as C and C++ are used in many of the applications and experiments, illustrating how genetic programming is not restricted to symbolic computing languages such as LISP. Researchers interested in getting started in genetic programming will find information on how to begin, on what public domain code is available, and on how to become part of the active genetic programming community via electronic mail.A major focus of the book is on improving the power of genetic programming. Experimental results are presented in a variety of areas, including adding memory to genetic programming, using locality and "demes" to maintain evolutionary diversity, avoiding the traps of local optima by using coevolution, using noise to increase generality, and limiting the size of evolved solutions to improve generality.Significant theoretical results in the understanding of the processes underlying genetic programming are presented, as are several results in the area of automatic function definition. Performance increases are demonstrated by directly evolving machine code, and implementation and design issues for genetic programming in C++ are discussed
Explorations in parallel distributed processing - macintosh version : a handbook of models, programs, and exercises( )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study of concepts by Christopher Peacocke( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Philosophers from Hume, Kant, and Wittgenstein to the recent realists and antirealists have sought to answer the question, What are concepts? This book provides a detailed, systematic, and accessible introduction to an original philosophical theory of concepts that Christopher Peacocke has developed in recent years to explain facts about the nature of thought, including its systematic character, its relations to truth and reference, and its normative dimension."--BOOK JACKET
Essays on nonconceptual content by York H Gunther( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Writers concerned with topics as varied as the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, epistemology and aesthetics have all challenged conceptualism. This volume offers some of the important work on nonconceptual content in the philosophy of mind and psychology
Consciousness reconsidered by Owen J Flanagan( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Consciousness is neither miraculous nor ultimately mysterious. In this broad, entertaining, and persuasive account Owen Flanagan argues that we are on the way to understanding consciousness and its place in the natural order. No aspect of consciousness escapes Flanagan's probe. Qualia, self-consciousness, autobiographical memory, perceptions, sensations, the stream of consciousness, disorders such as blindsight, various kinds of amnesia, and multiple personality all find a place in a constructive theory that brings into reflective equilibrium insights from a wide array of disciplines to reveal the deep, rich, and complex hidden structure of consciousness.Flanagan roams freely through a variety of scientific and philosophical domains, showing how it is possible to understand human consciousness in a way that gives its subjective, phenomenal aspects their full due while at the same time taking into account the neural bases of subjectivity. The result is a powerful synthetic theory of consciousness, a "constructive naturalism," according to which subjective consciousness is real, plays an important causal role, and resides in the brain.Flanagan draws the reader into a world of exciting current debates among such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, Paul Churchland, Patricia Churchland, and Colin McGinn, and he makes this world accessible. He masterfully weaves the latest insights from theory and research in cognitive neuroscience, neural darwinism, connectionist brain architecture, and PET scanners to reveal clear links between events that "seem a certain way" and underlying neural activity. William James's famous phenomenological analysis of consciousness and neurologically impaired characters from the writings of Oliver Sacks and A.R. Luria join the narrative, providing valuable insights into important current controversies on the relation of consciousness to self
Past, space, and self by John Campbell( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humans were thought to be unique among the species in having minds, but recent results showing the richness and diversity in animal psychology makes this view untenable. Yet there remains the question of whether we can map the features of a particularly human psychology that are responsible for the mind's overall structure. In this book John Campbell shows that the general structural features of human thought can be seen as having their source in the distinctive ways in which we think about space and time. He describes the contrasts between animal representations of space and time and distinctively human ways of thinking about them. In particular, he shows what is special about the human ability to think about the past. Campbell looks at how self-consciousness exploits these particular abilities in thinking about space and the past. He discusses at length the relation between self-consciousness and the first person and how fundamental the first person is in ordinary thought. Campbell shows that the structured character of ordinary thinking can be explained by reference to the demands of first-person thinking and the way in which first-person thinking exploits distinctively human representations of space and tim. Finally, he considers the metaphysical implications of this approach, in particular, how ordinary self-consciousness relies on a realist view of the past
Sketches of thought by Vinod Goel( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Much of the cognitive lies beyond articulate, discursive thought, beyond the reach of current computational notions. In Sketches of Thought, Vinod Goel argues that the cognitive computational conception of the world requires our thought processes to be precise, rigid, discrete, and unambiguous; yet there are dense, ambiguous, and amorphous symbol systems, like sketching, painting, and poetry, found in the arts and much of everyday discourse that have an important, non-trivial place in cognition. Goel maintains that while on occasion our thoughts do conform to the current computational theory of mind, they often are - indeed must be - vague, fluid, ambiguous, and amorphous. He argues that if cognitive science takes the classical computational story seriously, it must deny or ignore these processes, or at least relegate them to the realm of the nonmental. Along the way, Goel makes a number of significant and controversial interim points. He shows that there is a principled distinction between design and nondesign problems, that there are standard stages in the solution of design problems, that these stages correlate with the use of different types of external symbol systems, that these symbol systems are usefully individuated in Nelson Goodman's syntactic and semantic terms, and that different cognitive processes are facilitated by different types of symbol systems
 
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Handbook of developmental cognitive neuroscience
Covers
Mindblindness : an essay on autism and theory of mindThe analogical mind : perspectives from cognitive scienceThe computational brainComputational developmental psychologyThe Asymmetrical BrainLexical representation and processSites of vision : the discursive construction of sight in the history of philosophyQueer science : the use and abuse of research into homosexuality
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English (21)