WorldCat Identities

Mobilization for Youth, Inc., New York, Ny

Overview
Works: 45 works in 48 publications in 1 language and 81 library holdings
Classifications: LC4822,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth
The World of Education and the Board of Education City of New York. Progress Report by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

2 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following programs are being developed for the prevention and control of juvenile delinquency through expanding opportunites. Inservice training courses are designed to improve understanding of disadvantaged groups and to increase the effectiveness of their teaching programs. Training is offered in laboratory schools to test new materials and to allow graduate students to train through participation in urban classrooms and in social work. A curriculum center provides assistance to local schools by aiding in planning and developing curriculum and locating materials. The center also maintains a fairly extensive collection of materials and books for teacher and pupil use. Special teachers teach corrective reading in elementary and junior high school reading clinics. Homework helper programs are operated in eleven after-school centers. Enrichment practices are used in kindergarten. Four classes for 4-year-olds have been started. Attendance programs are aimed at helping potential truants with their problems to avoid excessive absenteeism. Social workers work in conjunction with mobilization for youth efforts in conducting workshops in family and school relations. Educational guidance and tutoring services are provided for dropouts in world of work and for youths desiring to return to school. Efforts are made to coordinate the various activities and committees by increased communication in regularly scheduled conferences
An Object Lesson for the War on Poverty by George D Younger( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With a focus on Mobilization for Youth (mfy) this paper questions whether community action projects are best administered by public or private sponsorship or by a combination of both. Mfy is a private organization financed by an nimh grant and oeo funds. Since its inception in 1959 it has remained administratively independent, but while this system provides relative autonomy in program implementation, a community action project faces problems of gaining support, as shown by attacks on mfy from the press. As an independent organization it had challenged the traditional power structure of both private agencies and city bureaucracies in the community action field, and, as a result, had cut itself off from any established base of support while remaining dependent on public institutions for funds. In response to public criticism, the city administration curtailed the autonomy of mfy programs and instituted a public investigation of its practices. Interested private groups did not defend MFY's position, and the organization has been compromised. (Nc)
Mfy--Mobilization for Youth, Inc., News Bulletin by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Articles concerning the status of the program as of summer 1965, were organized into a small "newspaper." Included were the following topics--(1) high school dropouts employed as teacher aids in kindergartens were returning to school, (2) the neighborhood service center program was explained, (3) mfy volunteer work crews helped erect concrete bleachers for a baseball park, (4) promotions and other changes in administrative positions were announced, (5) executive director bertram beck's appearance before a senate subcommittee on behalf of extension of the juvenile delinquency and youth offenders act of 1961 was summarized, (6) adventure corps campaigned for better sanitation, (7) the preschool compensatory education program was described, (8) mfy's budget for the school year 1964-65 was explained with accompanying diagrams, (9) early childhood experiments were explained. A good comprehensive picture of current status of mobilization for youth was provided
Pupil Reading Achievement in the Homework Helper Program. Preliminary Report by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Culturally disadvantaged low-achieving elementary school pupils were tutored by 10th and 11th grade students from academic and vocational high schools. The purpose was to help these fourth and fifth graders increase their school achievement, especially reading ability. Two groups were used, a control and an experimental group, one group met once a week, the other twice a week. The first hour was spent with each pupil working at a given skills station, as he improved he could move on to the next station. The second hour was spent with the tutor on regular homework. The hypotheses were that the pupils and tutors in the experimental group would improve in reading more than the control group, that reading improvement would be directly related to the intensity of tutorial service, that pupils working in "skills stations" would show greater improvement than pupils working only on homework, that the attitudes of the experimental and control groups will differ on school, aspiration, and social value, and that there will be no relationship between the intellectual and personality characteristics of tutors and their tutorial effectiveness. Evaluations of these hypotheses were still in process when the report was written
Statement on S. 1566, the Juvenile Delinquency and Youth OffencesControl Act of 1961 by Bertram M Beck( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mfy's executive director spoke in favor of extending the 1961 act. Myf received funds under this act and the director reported the progress it had made. One aspect of the project's attack on juvenile delinquency is the operation of a work-training program for potential dropouts. Work done by these groups proves the feasibility of the neighborhood youth corps. A number of dropouts have been employed as teacher helpers for elementary grades. Work-study programs in the schools have aided in preventing dropouts and in encouraging the return of students who have dropped out. Programs have been initiated which encourage the helped to become the helpers. More successful students are employed as tutors. Low-income, nonprofessional workers serve as visiting homemakers, work foreman, case aides, group leaders, or community organizers. Mfy works with youth recently released from institutions to help them adjust to community life. The program also includes research and other action programs. The program attempts to pull together all community resources in the interest of the delinquent rather than to employ the more conventional one-to-one method
Suggested Problems--Roman Numbers. Book I - Form B by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

2 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mathematics problems have been specially prepared in accordance with the aims of the curriculum center to motivate culturally deprived students. The references in the word problems concern objects familar to these students. Problem areas included are--roman numbers, the meaning of numbers, rounding numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, common fractions, addition and subtraction of fractions, multiplication of fractions, division of decimal fractions, and problems in per cent. All are presented in "story" or word-problem form
Bibliography of papers published, unpublished and presented at conferences by Inc., New York, NY Mobilization For Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to requests for agency material, the bibliography of papers from Mobilization for Youth experience and the training department was presented. The bibliography was divided into papers published, unpublished and presented at conferences. Under papers published were those by sherman barr, bertram beck, and melvin herman. Under published papers were those by William brennan, August hollingshead, and francis P. Puscell. Under papers unpublished and presented at conferences were those by charles F. Grosser, oscar ornati, and david young. Areas covered were curriculum, teachers' role, the students' role, family influence, poverty factor, and class factor
Role-playing with low-income people by Jean Goldfarb( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Role-playing, the flexible acting out of various types of problems in a permissive group atmosphere, was aimed at developing a full, inner feeling about a situation from acting out how other people actually felt in the situation. Role-playing was especially useful for low-income groups because they express themselves more readily when reacting to things they can see and do. Also the pattern of low-income people working together and responding to one another was favored by role-playing. Role-playing promoted group feeling and understanding through its informality and easy pace. Some of the problems of low-income people that could be role-played were community organizations, family problems, gang and youth problems, and authority problems. Role-playing could also be used by the social workers themselves. Role-playing accomplished a number of things including changing attitudes, making people aware of the feelings of others, and allowing a freedom of expression. The learning that took place in role-playing was incidental learning, kinesthetic, and emotional learning, and helped increase an individual's awareness of his potentials and possibilities. Some of the techniques used in role-playing were reversal, soliloquy, projection, and nonverbal expression. A two-stage session was outlined, and a bibliography was included
Mobilization for Youth in New York City by Abraham J Tannenbaum( Book )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interlocking action programs were designed to open opportunities for low income, minority groups in a slum area. Today, the majority of residents are impoverished puerto rican in-migrants, with a smaller sprinkling of low income negro, chinese, jewish, italian, and polish groups. Myf provides job training and placement for unemployed youth, group social work and organization of the unaffiliated for community action, social services to individuals and families, and special educational programs for children and youth. The various education provisions cluster around five distinct areas of services, which may be characterized as follows--(1) curriculum planning and development - the curriculum center is staffed by educators with experience in depressed areas, and also serves as a sounding board and communications agency for the best ideas developed in the local classrooms. Language arts is the main concern, (2) teacher education - by learning more about family life in these slum areas, teachers will be better able to bridge the gap between home and school, (3) early education intervention - started in preschool where it is possible to head off retardation that most often comes early in these slum areas. Some of these children are bilingual or nonenglish speaking, (4) correction and remediation - most of this correction is located in the slum areas because of the high cost of materials, teachers, and helping services. Mobilization is attempting to achieve these goals in two ways--first, by improving the quality of remedial instruction, and second, by translating superior remedial instruction into improved classroom teaching
Priorities for Curriculum Program. Draft by Lawrence Brody( Book )

1 edition published in 1963 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The debilitating effects of poverty and cultural deprivation can be alleviated through education. Increase of academic success through curriculum improvement and reorientation is sought. Suggested priorities are--use and evaluation of new methods and materials to be made available, coordination with and assistance to other action programs, and correlation and consultation with outside agencies
Teachers of the Poor by Arlene Hannah( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The problems regarding the teaching of low-income children were presented. Formerly, white, protestant, middle-class norms were forced upon these children, and the teacher who attempted to teach them came ill-prepared for the task. Such innovations as crash remedial courses, preschool programs, and increased guidance services were effective, but the answer lay in the education of young teachers. The beginning of such education should take place in the teacher-training institutions. A new system of teaching geared to low-income children should be developed that would include more sociology and anthropology. Student teachers should be provided with community field trips, home visits, and student teaching in a variety of situations. They should become well acquainted with the attitudes of low-income pupils. The teacher's education should also include a development style which would help her have more effective rapport with the class. She should develop a style through the use of role-playing and should practice before she actually entered a classroom to teach
Curriculum Improvement by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In an effort to improve education for culturally deprived children, a curriculum planning committee should be set up, including one member from each district or area. An advisory committee and specialists should coordinate with the committee. A curriculum coordinator should be appointed for each elementary school involved in the program. The coordinator would synchronize all instruction-improvement efforts and act as liaison between the schools and the community
What Makes Things Go by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The initial question in the title is answered through simple experiments for culturally disadvantaged children in elementary school. Muscles, running, water, wind, steam, fast burning and electricity are found to "make things go." Using these basic discoveries, vocabulary is built up by working with different words relating to the experiments. A story is told in terms familiar to the culturally deprived children. The boy in the story makes the discoveries shown in the experiments as he plays with christmas toys
Supplementary Teaching Assistance in Reading. Project Star by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The proceedings at the second meeting of a reading clinic for parents of culturally disadvantaged youth is described. At the reading clinic the parents were introduced to several activities which their children might try at home in connection with newspapers, magazines, the tv guide, and other such reading materials. The activities included headline reading, picture study, summarizing of articles, and new word lists. Other home activities such as reading to and by the children, word games, and verbal summaries by the children of lessons learned at school were also encouraged. In these ways it was hoped that parents might provide an atmosphere in the home to supplement and strengthen language skills learned by the children at school. A period when parents could ask questions, comment on the clinic, or verbalize problems encountered at home was provided. Each parent attending the clinic was given a list of adult education classes held in N.Y.C. for the purpose of teaching english, completing elementary school education, preparing candidates for naturalization requirements and citizenship, and preparing for literacy tests. In addition, each parent received a list of places of interest in new york city which would provide worthwhile experience for the children and the entire family. The list was written in both english and spanish and included libraries, museums, parks, zoos, beaches, monuments, airports, ball parks, hospitals, bridges, and tunnels
Mobilization for Youth Early Childhood Education by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A list of goals and suggested implementation for the education of young children was given. Among the objectives were the formation of language concepts, the learning of relationships between words and sentences, the development of awareness of self, and development of familiarity with environments. Some of the activities for implementation of these goals were daily conversation periods, various kinds of games to develop attention, memory, listening, and perception skills, song periods that require individual and group responses, use of tape recorder, and use of tom-tom to familiarize children with rhythms and word syllables. A detailed list of suggested materials, equipment, and children's books for early childhood classes accompanies the guide
The Remedial Education Program, a Description of Its Structure, Curriculum Design, Courses of Study, and a Selected Sample of TestedTeaching Units by Bertram M Beck( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The program was established to help 16- to 21-year-old trainees in the neighborhood youth corps overcome their deficiencies in english language skills, reading, and mathematics and improve their capacity for problem solving and self-instruction. They were assigned to the program for half of each work day, or 15 hours a week. On the basis of diagnostic test results, the trainee population was divided into subgroups of those who were non-english speaking, who had a functional command of conversational english but were lower than second-grade level in reading, who could read at the second- to low fourth-grade level, who could read at the fourth- to seventh-grade level, and who had skill high enough to prepare for the high-school equivalency examination. Class size was limited to seven in the first four groups and to 10 in the fifth group. A step-by-step individual skills-mastery program was planned for each trainee, each program prescribing methods, materials, and evaluation procedures to be used. This approach assured uniformity of educational treatment for all trainees with similar learning problems and permitted systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of various methods and materials. Additional materials were developed to supplement the core curriculum. Thematic materials and activities to strengthen the cultural identification of negroes and puerto ricans and to promote harmony between them were incorporated. A social realities curriculum was designed to equip the trainee with the skills and attitudes needed to escape, both physically and emotionally, from the ghetto. The 17 appendixes contain diagnostic and instructional resource materials including the language proficiency test battery, basic reading skills resource materials, language workshop units, mathematics skills units, and the social realities material. (Hc)
What Makes Things Go, Teacher's Guide by Larry Brody( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Six fifth-grade science units are presented--sound and light in communication, living things, weather, earth and its resources, motion and foreign transportation, and electromagnets. The interest level is appropriate for fifth-graders, but three reading ability levels, grades 1, 3, and 5, are provided. The teacher is thus enabled to motivate children through interest-arousing field trips, science experiments, or demonstrations, and then provide them with reading material designed to fit both interest and ability. The manual is an exploratory effort, designed both to improve learning of fifth-grade pupils in the curricular areas of science and reading, and to illustrate to teachers how they may construct and adapt materials to meet the emerging needs of disadvantaged children. A list of words deriving from science content and supplementary needs is provided for purposes of preteaching. Such vocabulary should be taught concretely, using science experiment material. Drill sheets in language arts and reading skills are to be used after pupils have read appropriate selections and seek to evaluate the extent to which essential reading skills have been mastered. Science drill sheets test learning of content. A bibliography and a list of useful audiovisual materials are appended
The Low-Income Non-Professional, an Overview of His Role in the Program by George Brager( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The use of low income nonprofessional workers in social services was found to benefit both the worker and the social welfare agency. First, it increases the vocational opportunities for the slum dweller and provides him with the psychological support of a satisfying job. Second, the low income nonprofessional as a "social class mediator" facilitates easier communication and, consequently, the greater involvement of other urban slum residents in a social welfare program. Mobilization for youth (mfy) in new york city employs nonprofessionals in three programs--the parent education aide unit, the community development program, and the visiting homemaker service. Mfy's criteria in hiring nonprofessionals are (1) expertise in the activities of a particular program, (2) identification with other lower class people, and (3) an action-orientation, that is, a belief in group solutions to the problems of minority group status and poverty. Sharing mutual interests with the clients, and unencumbered by professional roles, the nonprofessional tends to be more direct and realistic in dealing with clients than the professional. Careful organization can minimize the competition between the nonprofessional and his higher status colleagues and can discourage the former from becoming poor copies of their professional supervisors. Although institutional rigidities have sometimes limited their usefulness, nonprofessionals have contributed substantially to mfy programs. (Td)
Synopsis of Selected Programs. Fiscal Year 1965-1966 by Inc., New York, Ny Mobilization for Youth( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The laboratory school provided experience for teachers working with lower-class groups and encouraged the use of local facilities for research and experimentation. A staff of fifteen, operates a curriculum center to aid school personnel in curriculum planning and material procurment. In addition the center produces instructional units and teacher guides with assisting materials. A reading center seeks to develop teaching skills of teachers in moderately retarded classes. A reading clinic attempts to locate and develop techniques and materials to be used in elementary and junior high schools. Enriched educational experiences are provided for 117 prekindergarten through first grade children. Elementary school pupils are helped in after-school homework sessions using paid high school students as tutors. Absenteeism is reduced by special guidance counselors who seek out the causes of absenteeism. Summer help for children retarded in their school work is given in classes, reading clinics and tutorial help. A projected program would seek to motivate students through special counselors, teaching services, saturday and after-school enrichment programs, trips, scholarships, parent workshops, and motivational training classes. A demonstration preschool program for a racially, economically, and linguistically mixed group is to be set up. It will use the montessori method of instruction
Role-playing and the poor by Frank Riessman( Book )

1 edition published in 1963 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Role-playing is a valuable technique for working with disadvantaged people because it is congenial with the low-income person's style. Role-playing allows the practitioner to reduce the distance between himself and the disadvantaged, it permits more learning about the culture of the low-income person from the "inside," and it is an excellent technique for developing verbal power in the educationally deprived person. People with low income tend to work out mental problems best when they can do things physically. Role-playing appears suited to this physical, action-centered, motor style. Role-playing breaks the "office barrier" by creating a setting in which the therapist and the low-income client are on an equal footing in terms of style. Some illustrations of role-playing are given. One simulates the teaching of academic material to nonprofessional and professional personnel. Another helps to develop teacher styles for working with the deprived. Role-playing should be nontheatrical, with a very simple, direct approach. The low-income people worked with in this study preferred an informal setting, groups of no more than 10 people, and little introductory didactic material. Role-playing and the middle class are briefly discussed. Differences in approach which would appeal to the middle class are pointed out. The middle class person may feel that role-playing is an in-group gimmick, lacking in dignity and status, therefore the various psychotherapeutic functions of role-playing, such as catharsis, support, and problem objectification should be made explicit
 
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English (22)