WorldCat Identities

National Center for History in the Schools, Los Angeles, Ca

Overview
Works: 38 works in 38 publications in 1 language and 38 library holdings
Genres: History  Case studies  Biography  Juvenile works 
Classifications: F229, 973.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by National Center for History in the Schools, Los Angeles, Ca
The People's Republic of China : who should own the land? : a unit of study for grades 7-10 by Susan Meisler( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit begins by examining the problem of rural poverty in China in the 1940s. a variety of solutions attempted by the Chinese government between the mid 1940s and the present all aimed at the improvement of peasant living standards in the countryside. Because 80 percent of China's people are peasants, the Chinese Communist party saw the necessity of altering Orthodox Marxism from an urban to a rural focus. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the government embarked on a program of land reform to obtain political support from poor peasants. In 1956 the government shifted dramatically to a system of communal land ownership similar to that which existed in the Soviet Union. After many twists and turns marked by both natural disasters and political upheavals, the government began in 1980 a new phase of private land ownership called the "Family Responsibility System." This unit examines the above progression of events. Lesson 1 dramatizes the inequality of land ownership between the gentry and peasant classes. Lesson 2 documents Mao Zedong's realization that peasant support was necessary to gain political power and describes the initial stages of land reform. Lesson 3 explains how peasant life was altered by the establishment of the communes. Lesson 4 describes the partial return to private management of land. Whenever possible, the student assumes the role of the peasant to dramatize and make relevant the choices that were faced. The student will evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of the different approaches to land ownership taken by the Chinese government. Contains 13 references. (Author/DK)
Images of the Orient, nineteenth-century European travelers to Muslim lands : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Susan L Douglass( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This teaching unit represents a specific "dramatic moment" in history that can allow students to delve into the deeper meanings of selected landmark events and explore their wider context in the great historical narrative. Studying a crucial turning point in history helps students realize that history is an ongoing, open-ended process, and that the decisions made today create the conditions of tomorrow's history. This unit focuses on travelers who visited Muslim regions of Asia and Africa during the 19th century. Each lesson in the unit covers a different type of traveler's experience, including explorers, pilgrims, tourists, archaeologists, artists, colonial officials and their families, journalists, photographers, and literary figures, whose expressions range from travel narratives to scientific writings, letters, dispatches, poems, paintings, maps, and photographs. By using this approach, the student becomes aware that choices are made by real human beings and that these decisions are the result of specific factors. Within the unit are teacher background materials and lesson plans with student resources. The unit is designed as a supplement to the customary course materials. The various lessons are written for different grade levels, and they can usually be adapted to a slightly higher or lower level. Lesson plans include a variety of ideas and approaches for the teacher that can be lengthened or shortened. Student resources accompany the lesson plans and contain primary source documents, handouts, student background materials, and a 23-item annotated bibliography. (Bt)
In the aftermath of war : cultural clashes of the twenties : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Nina Gifford( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is a collection of lessons for teaching about cultural clashes. Based on primary sources, the unit contains teacher background materials and three lesson plans with student resources. These lessons deal with the United States between World War I and World War ii. The United States emerged from World War I with seismic faults in its society, with clashes that would reverberate through the decade and beyond. A study of the contrast between modern urban and traditional rural society can help students grasp the era's great complexity and give them insights into different cultural attitudes that still exist in U.S. society. Using a variety of documents, plus cooperative and individual instructional activities that emphasize critical thinking, students examine the attitudes and strategies of people struggling with competing world views. Art, literature, and film also are used to illustrate key points. The unit is built on three objectives: (1) to identify social and economic changes that had been occurring in the United States since the late 19th century; (2) to identify reactions to the social and economic changes that had been occurring; and (3) to recognize that the emergence of new beliefs and attitudes produce tensions and conflicts in society. The first lesson plan, "Urban America in the Twenties," allows students to identify social and economic trends in the early 20th century, describe urban modernism in the 1920's, and reactions to it. The second lesson, "Rural Traditionalism in the Twenties," helps students describe rural traditionalism in the 1920's and reactions. The third lesson contains case studies. Contains three references. (Author/DK)
Keeping them apart : Plessy v. Ferguson and the black experience in post-Reconstruction America : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Jim Ruderman( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit focuses on the black experience in the critical years after Reconstruction. Using the landmark decision in Plessy V. Ferguson in 1896, the unit opens with an examination of conditions in black America during the post-Reconstruction years. Political opportunities or lack thereof; economic and class status; as well as social interaction will be illustrated through documentary material. In the Plessy case, the U.S. Supreme Court interpreted the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees of due process and equal protection to mean that "separate but equal" facilities could be provided on the basis of race. By examining the Supreme Court's reasoning in Plessy within the historical context of the period, the student will be able to evaluate the successes and the failures of Reconstruction. By examining the Court's decision itself, students can investigate the nature of judicial review through an example of constitutional interpretation that stands in sharp contrast to the judicial activist character of the Warren Court's decision in Brown V. Board of Education nearly 60 years later. This unit challenges students to see the relationship between law and society and how prejudice works. The unit objectives are: students will evaluate the conditions of blacks in the north and south between 1875 and 1900 using documentary and statistical evidence; the successes and failures of Reconstruction for freedmen will be analyzed; students will identify Plessy V. Ferguson as an organized resistance by black leaders to segregation laws in the south; the Supreme Court's reasoning in this decision will be analyzed and; the concept of judicial review and its importance in American Constitutional government will be identified and discussed. Contains three references. (Dk)
Early Chinese immigration and the process of exclusion : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Vivian Wu Wong( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using primary source documents, this teaching unit focuses on the problems Chinese immigrants had in the United States during the late 19th century. Each of three lessons presents issues regarding the decision of Chinese immigrants to come to the United States and their subsequent exclusion from and struggles to assimilate into the U.S. society. The unit offers a unit overview, unit context, correlation to National Standards for U.S. History, unit objectives, a lesson plan list, and a historical background of Chinese immigration and the process of exclusion. Lessons are: (1) "Making a Choice"; (2) "Debating Exclusion"; and (3) "Struggling to Survive." Each lesson includes a variety of ideas and approaches for implementation, student resources in the form of primary source documents, handouts, and a bibliography. (Mm)
The neolithic revolution : the first farmers and shepherds : a unit of study for grades 6-8 by Linda Symcox( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit presents lessons on the New Stone Age or Neolithic period from 8,000 to 3,500 B.C. The unit attempts to develop the profound changes in human society brought about by the domestication of plants and animals. The development of agriculture and the resultant move from wandering hunter gatherers to settled villages has been called the great leap forward in the history of humankind. Lesson 1 places the Neolithic period in its geological time frame and explains the discoveries made by archaeologists, which are the only source of information for this period. Lesson 2 describes the shift from hunting and gathering to herding and farming. Lesson 3 discusses the archaeological sites of Beidha and Catal Huyuk as examples of permanent villages and houses. Lesson 4 covers developments in both decorative and religious arts. It is essential that students of world history understand that the Neolithic Revolution was the necessary foundation for the great civilizations that followed. It was the most important single innovation in the evolution of human society before the Industrial Revolution. Through agriculture humans now controlled and regulated their food supply rather than depending on the caprice of nature. What domestication did was create an assured food supply and large settled communities and ultimately cities. Archaeologists and anthropologists have shown that early farming involved much more labor and much more risk than did hunting and gathering. Therefore, a crisis must have forced the change. Many theories exist as to the nature of this crisis. The unit does not emphasize the question of why agriculture developed. Contains 13 references. (Author/DK)
Mansa Musa, African king of gold : a unit of study for grades 7-9 by Joe Palumbo( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that presents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit challenges the idea that Africa was backward and unknown to the outside world before the arrival of the Europeans. It shows that strong leadership and well organized societies had existed in Africa long before European colonialism. Here, as in medieval Europe, kings' strength and respectability heavily depended on the material wealth they possessed. They shared this wealth among their most loyal followers, who in turn shared it among those they ruled or commanded. One of the greatest and most far reaching empires of the later middle ages was in West Africa. The kingdom of Mali stunned both the Muslim and the Christian worlds with its wealth, power, and influence. One of Mali's greatest leaders, the emperor Mansa Musa awakened the world to Mali's greatness in 1324 on his pilgrimage to Mecca when he spent and distributed so much gold that it deflated its price in Cairo for the next 12 years. Several Arab scholars were so impressed by this man that they followed him back to Mali to investigate further this amazing civilization. The writings of these scholars serve as the primary source documents for this unit. Through the examination, interpretation, and synthesis of these writings, students will be able to draw conclusions about the people and culture of Mali, the role of the emperor, and the nature of Mansa Musa himself. Contains seven references. (Author/DK)
National standards for history : basic edition by Los Angeles, Ca National Center for History in the Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This revised guide is intended for teachers to aid in development of history curriculum in the schools and explains what students should know and be able to do in each of the grade levels. The book addresses two types of standards: (1) historical thinking skills; and (2) historical understandings. Standards in history for grades k-4 include: (1) "Living and Working Together in Families and Communities, Now and Long Ago"; (2) "The History of Students' Own State or Region"; (3) "The History of the United States: Democratic Principles and Values and the Peoples from Many Cultures Who Contributed to Its Cultural, Economic, and Political Heritage"; and (4) "The History of Peoples of Many Cultures Around the World." U.S. history standards for grades 5-12 include the eras: (1) "Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)"; (2) "Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)"; (3) "Revolution and the New Nation" (1754-1820s); (4) "Expansion and Reform" (1801-1861); (5) "Civil War and Reconstruction" (1850-1877); (6) "The Development of the Industrial United States" (1870-1900); (7) "The Emergence of Modern America" (1890-1930); (8) "The Great Depression and World War ii" (1929-1945); (9) "Postwar United States" (1945-1970s); and (10) "Contemporary United States" (1968-present). World history standards for grades 5-12 include the topics: (1) "The Beginnings of Human Society"; (2) "Early Civilizations and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples, 4000-1000 bce"; (3) "Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, 1000 bce-300 ce"; (4) "Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, 300-1000 ce"; (5) "Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000-1500 ce"; (6) "The Emergence of the First Global Age, 1450-1770"; (7) "An Age of Revolutions, 1750-1914"; (8) "a Half-Century of Crisis and Achievement, 1900-1945"; and (9) "The 20th Century Since 1945: Promises and Paradoxes." (Eh)
The great convergence : the Pueblo and Spaniards meet ; a unit of study for grades 8-12 by John Arevalo( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Focusing on the great convergence of Native Americans and Spaniards in the American Southwest introduces students to the indigenous Anasazi, the Spanish Colonists, and the ensuing conflict of cultures culminating with the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. This unit is based on and uses primary resources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period being studied. It is designed to supplement texts that pay little or no attention to the Southwest region of the United States and makes clear that the Southwest had a complex history that antedated the arrival of English speaking people. The unit includes background materials that provide an overview, lesson plans, and student resources. (Bt)
Early Jamestown : a unit of study for grades 5-8 by J. D Pearson( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. By studying a crucial turning point in history students become aware that choices had to be made by real human beings, that those decisions were the result of specific factors, and that they set in motion a series of historical consequences. Through primary sources, this unit explores the founding and early development of Jamestown and the relationship between the colonists and the indigenous people. Although the colony was established by the Virginia Company of London in the hope of making a profit by finding gold, locating a trade route to Asia, or harnessing the labor of the natives, only the discovery that tobacco could be raised profitably permitted the colony's survival. The colonists' first years were marked by disease, disaster, and death brought about largely by inappropriate expectations, poor planning, and an inability to adapt to the unfamiliar world in which they found themselves. During this same period, the foundations of Anglo-Indian relations in Virginia also were being laid. Students need to understand how very tenuous England's early efforts at colonization actually were. They need to learn how the haphazard and ill-considered decisions of the first English colonists had a profound impact on Anglo-Indian relations. Finally, this unit allows students to experience history in a way that lets them see the past not as a series of inevitable events, but as the meandering record of human choices. (Author/DK)
The role of women in medieval Europe : a unit of study for grades 10-12 by Rhoda Himmell( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit consists of lessons focused on selected topics in medieval history that define and describe the roles of women. The lessons examine the roles of women in the Early Middle Ages with particular emphasis on the culture of the Germanic tribes that penetrated the Roman Empire, property rights of women in the feudal framework, the participation of women in the expansion of cultural and intellectual pursuits in the 11th through 13th centuries, and demographics and the occupational roles of women in the late Middle Ages. A role playing project that applies to several important topics of the Middle Ages and that includes many female roles is included. The unit is designed with five objectives: (1) to identify and describe some important and prominent roles that women played in medieval social, economic, and political life; (2) to understand that women's roles varied according to time, place, and circumstance throughout the medieval period; (3) to recognize that male attitudes established more or less the place of women within the framework of medieval society; (4) to gain experience in the analysis of primary source documents as a fundamental aspect of history; and (5) to practice formulation of generalizations from specific descriptive materials. The unit contains a 15-item annotated bibliography. (Dk)
Early Chinese history : the hundred schools period, China's golden age of philosophy : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Lehn Huff( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this unit students examine the four most influential Chinese philosophical traditions developed during the Zhou period (roughly 6th-3rd centuries B.C.E.). The four philosophies students study include: (1) Confucianism; (2) Mohism; (3) Daoism (Taoism); and (4) Legalism. In three lessons, students compare the ideas of these schools and explore how such ideas were conditioned by and, in turn, impacted society, economy, government, and culture. The unit uses a "dramatic moment" situated in the historic context and provides primary sources for students to examine during the course of the unit. The unit also contains "Teacher Background Materials" and "Lessons Plans with Student Resources." (Eh)
Kongo : a kingdom divided : a unit of study for grades 7-11 by Ernest L O'roark( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit uses a case study of the Kingdom of the Kongo (Congo) to answer questions about the trans-Atlantic slave trade from an African perspective. The unit is appropriate for use in any study of the history of sub-Saharan Africa. Because it focuses on the African perspective of events surrounding the slave trade, it supports in-depth studies of the slave trade or slavery in general. The unit contains objectives, correlations to the National History Standards, teacher background materials, lesson plans, student resources, and a selected bibliography. The six lessons focus on working with primary source documents to understand the complexity of the slave trade, tracing events from 1488, the date of first contact between Africans of the Congo River region with the Portuguese. The unit includes a set of short historical fiction integrated into five of the six lessons. These stories recount the experiences of individuals who witnessed the encounter between Kongo and the Portuguese. Although the lessons are recommended for grades 7-11, they can be adapted for other grade levels. An 11-item bibliography concludes the unit. (Bt)
National Standards for History for Grades K-4: Exp anding Children's World in Time and Space. Exp anded Edition. Including Examples of Student Achievement for Grades K-2 and 3-4 by Lotta Crabtree( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Developed through a broad-based national consensus building process, the national history standards project has involved working toward agreement both on the larger purposes of history in the school curriculum and on the more specific history understandings and thinking processes all students should have equal opportunity to acquire over 12 years of precollegiate education. Divided into 3 chapters, this document presents the national standards developed for grades k-4. The first chapter is on developing standards in history for students in grades k-4. It discusses the significance of history for the educated citizen, definition of standards, basic principles in development of standards for k-4, integrating historical thinking and historical understandings in standards for grades k-4, and questions concerning these standards. Policy issues discussed are: (1) ensuring equity for all students; (2) providing adequate instructional time for history; and (3) linking history to related studies in geography, civics, literature, and the arts in an integrated or interdisciplinary curriculum for grades k-4. The second chapter presents an overview of standards in historical thinking including chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretation, historical research capabilities, and historical issues analysis and decision making. Chapter 3 surveys eight standards organized under four topics: (1) living and working together in families and communities, now and long ago; (2) the history of students' own state or region; (3) U.S. history, democratic principles and values, people from many cultures who contributed to U.S. cultural, economic, and political heritage; and (4) history of peoples of many cultures around the world. An appendix lists contributors and participating organizations. (Dk)
Emperor Ashoka of India, what makes a ruler legitimate? : a unit of study for grades 7-12 by Jean Johnson( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

During the age of agriculturally based empires, various conquerors from the western Mediterranean to East Asia brought large population areas under their own centralized authority. Gradually many of these conquerors came to realize that, although military might was necessary to gain control over an area, sheer force of arms was not sufficient to govern effectively and ensure the loyalty and obedience of one's subjects. The Chinese would say: "You can win a kingdom from horseback, but you cannot rule from there." The historic period covered in this unit runs from Alexander of Macedonia's consolidation of his conquests (later fourth-century B.C.E.) to the rise of China's Sui Dynasty (581-618 C.E.) which appropriated Buddhist values and laid conditions for their adaptation in Korea and Japan. The objectives of this unit are: (1) to understand the concept of political legitimacy (what makes people believe that the ruler has the right to rule and they should obey his or her commands); (2) to identify and understand some of the different bases of legitimacy such as power, heredity, the ballot, and moral force; (3) to identify and understand symbols of power such as a crown and other regalia; (4) to understand Ashoka's use of moral authority instead of military might as a basis for legitimacy; (5) to examine the meaning of the "stupa" and how it was associated with political power and legitimacy; and (6) to investigate ways that rulers in Southeast and East Asia adapted the Ashokan model as a source of legitimacy. Establishing legitimacy is a challenge for any leader or government. Therefore, the concepts examined in this unit are applicable to many periods of history, as well as to civics or government courses. The unit also helps to examine cultural diffusion and the spread of religious ideas. Teaching materials that apply to national standards for history are provided. (Contains 16 references.) (Bt)
The Enlightenment : a unit of study for grades 7-10 by Carole Collier Frick( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this unit is to explore the ideas and ideals of the 18th century Enlightenment thinkers called the Philosophes, and to understand how they continue to influence basic notions about the nature of man and his world. The unit introduces key members of the Philosophes through short excerpts from their works. The selections illustrate the social concerns of Enlightenment thinkers in society, politics, and education. Through a study of primary sources, the works of Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Condorcet are discussed. Voltaire and the "enlightened despot" Frederick the Great also are introduced, as is the revolutionary "Encyclopedie" of Denis Diderot. The unit ends with the influence of the Enlightenment on the New World through a lesson on Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence. The ideals of the 18th century Enlightenment acquaint students with the vision of the perfectibility of man through the power of reason, which laid the basis for the notion of egalitarianism at the heart of the French and American Revolutions. Fundamental issues such as the basic nature and rights of man are discussed, as is the value of reason over tyrannical authority. This unit also shows the relationship between ideals and their practical application in society. Through the use of primary sources both written and visual, the student is able to experience the age of reason. By learning about the Philosophes, the student will develop critical thinking and inductive reasoning. Contains 13 references. (Author/DK)
Ibn Battuta: A View of the Fourteenth-Century World. a Unit of Study for Grades 7-10 by Joan Arno( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The adventures of Ibn Battuta, the Muslim world traveler, provide a mechanism for teaching about the early 14th century. The study of Ibn Battuta helps students to understand what is known about the past and how it is known, in terms of both history and historiography. The unit can be presented in connection with such commonly taught topics as Muslim civilization, the Mongol empires, West African kingdoms, Europe in the later Middle Ages, medieval trade and travel, Marco Polo, the Black Death, and the hemispheric context of the European voyages of discovery. Students will understand: (1) the geography of Afro-Eurasia and the features that connect large parts of this world region; (2) the significance of Ibn Battuta's journey in the context of historical documents and the religious and cultural experience of Muslims within Dar al-Islam; (3) maps and primary documents; and (4) the tools and dilemmas of the historian in doing research and using primary sources. Students will be able to write cohesive essays as well as verbally analyze the material presented. The unit contains an overview and rationale, extensive map exercises, a summary of Ibn Battuta's travels and adventures, and suggested activities designed to develop a variety of skills. Contains a 13-item bibliography. (Bt)
The golden age of Greece : imperial democracy 500-400 B.C. : a unit of study for grades 6-12 by Peter Cheoros( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit explores Greece's most glorious century, the high point of Athenian culture. Rarely has so much genius been concentrated in one small region over such a short period of time. Students discover in studying Greece's Classical Age many aspects of their own heritage. Present day ideas of government, philosophy, literature, science, and aesthetics can be linked directly back to Ancient Greece. Without an awareness of this remarkable heritage and an appreciation for the creativity of the period, along with an appreciation of other ancient civilizations, students cannot begin to understand enduring values and the creative power of humankind. While studying the unit students also become aware of the conflicts in human values that are an enduring and unavoidable part of human society. In this unit students will explore various aspects of the remarkable culture of imperial Athens. They study the origin of Athenian naval power during the Persian Wars, learn how Athenians passed laws, contemplate the brilliance of Athenian imperial culture as reflected in the Parthenon, examine its decline in the Peloponnesian War, and consider the nature of Athenian citizenship and its problems as illustrated by the institution of ostracism, Sophocles' play "Antigone," and the trial of Socrates. A chronological table of Greek politics and culture from 750 to 400 B.C. is included. Contains 37 references. (Author/DK)
The origins of Greek civilization : from the Bronze Age to the Polis, ca. 2500-600 B.C. by Rhoda Himmell( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This document consists of three units in which students study and compare the two civilizations of ancient Greece, that of the Greek kingdoms of the second millennium B.C. and the city states of historical Greece, and learn how historians use archaeological evidence to reconstruct the history of Mycenaean Greece. Suggestions are included for helping students appreciate one of the principal written sources for early Greek culture, the "Odyssey." The first unit "Bronze Age Civilization in the Aegean: Crete, Mycenae, and Troy ca. 2500-100 B.C." is a unit of study for grades 9-10. The purpose of this unit is to examine the origins, history, and culture of the earliest European civilizations at Crete and Mycenae with a focus on the archaeological evidence and examination of writing systems that link the two areas. Background for settlements on the island of Crete and on the Greek Peloponnese, key historic events, and a survey of the cultures of these areas are included. A discussion of both the mythological and archaeological sources for the Trojan War is provided in order to relate the Trojan War to the history of the Mycenaeans. The value of archaeology as the main source of information about the ancient period is emphasized. The second unit is "Homer's Odyssey: An Elementary Passion" for grades 1-6. This section contains selected activities for elementary students studying the "Odyssey." The third unit, "The Polis" is designed for grades 6-10. The purpose of this unit is to allow students to understand the function of the polis as an integral part of Greek life. Each unit contains references. (Dk)
The Harlem Renaissance : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Nina Gifford( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This teaching unit represents a specific "dramatic moment" in history that can allow students to delve into the deeper meanings of selected landmark events and explore their wider context in the great historical narrative. Studying a crucial turning point in history helps students realize that history is an ongoing, open-ended process, and that the decisions they make today create the conditions of tomorrow's history. This unit is about the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance is part of the post-World War I cultural upheaval that found all of U.S. society trying to come to terms with the shift from a rural way of life to an urban and industrialized one. The unit can be taught after studying World War I or as a transition to the era of the Great Depression and the New Deal. The unit is based on primary sources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. Within the unit are teacher background materials that provide an overview of the entire unit and the historical information and context necessary to link the "dramatic moment" to the larger historical narrative. Lesson plans include a variety of ideas and approaches. An extensive bibliography contains 7 items about painting and sculpture, 13 poem citations, 12 articles and maps, and 7 recording dates. (Bt)
 
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