WorldCat Identities

National Center for History in the Schools, Los Angeles, Ca

Overview
Works: 68 works in 68 publications in 1 language and 69 library holdings
Genres: History  Bibliography  Juvenile works 
Classifications: E175.8, 973.07
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by National Center for History in the Schools, Los Angeles, Ca
Selected teaching materials for United States & world history : an annotated bibliography by Linda Symcox( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This annotated bibliography describes 55 titles of teaching materials that have been selected in order to provide history teachers with a list of high quality resources to supplement their textbooks. The materials are organized into the following categories: America: All Periods; Eighteenth Century America and the Revolution; The Constitutional Period; Nineteenth Century America; Twentieth Century America; World History; Women's History; and National Center for History in the Schools Teaching Units. Each entry includes the title, author or publisher, date, type of materials, length, grade level, source, and description. (DB)
Images of the Orient, nineteenth-century European travelers to Muslim lands : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Susan L Douglass( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This teaching unit represents a specific "dramatic moment" in history that can allow students to delve into the deeper meanings of selected landmark events and explore their wider context in the great historical narrative. Studying a crucial turning point in history helps students realize that history is an ongoing, open-ended process, and that the decisions made today create the conditions of tomorrow's history. This unit focuses on travelers who visited Muslim regions of Asia and Africa during the 19th century. Each lesson in the unit covers a different type of traveler's experience, including explorers, pilgrims, tourists, archaeologists, artists, colonial officials and their families, journalists, photographers, and literary figures, whose expressions range from travel narratives to scientific writings, letters, dispatches, poems, paintings, maps, and photographs. By using this approach, the student becomes aware that choices are made by real human beings and that these decisions are the result of specific factors. Within the unit are teacher background materials and lesson plans with student resources. The unit is designed as a supplement to the customary course materials. The various lessons are written for different grade levels, and they can usually be adapted to a slightly higher or lower level. Lesson plans include a variety of ideas and approaches for the teacher that can be lengthened or shortened. Student resources accompany the lesson plans and contain primary source documents, handouts, student background materials, and a 23-item annotated bibliography. (Bt)
Early Chinese immigration and the process of exclusion : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Vivian Wu Wong( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using primary source documents, this teaching unit focuses on the problems Chinese immigrants had in the United States during the late 19th century. Each of three lessons presents issues regarding the decision of Chinese immigrants to come to the United States and their subsequent exclusion from and struggles to assimilate into the U.S. society. The unit offers a unit overview, unit context, correlation to National Standards for U.S. History, unit objectives, a lesson plan list, and a historical background of Chinese immigration and the process of exclusion. Lessons are: (1) "Making a Choice"; (2) "Debating Exclusion"; and (3) "Struggling to Survive." Each lesson includes a variety of ideas and approaches for implementation, student resources in the form of primary source documents, handouts, and a bibliography. (Mm)
The great convergence : the Pueblo and Spaniards meet ; a unit of study for grades 8-12 by John Arevalo( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Focusing on the great convergence of Native Americans and Spaniards in the American Southwest introduces students to the indigenous Anasazi, the Spanish Colonists, and the ensuing conflict of cultures culminating with the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. This unit is based on and uses primary resources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period being studied. It is designed to supplement texts that pay little or no attention to the Southwest region of the United States and makes clear that the Southwest had a complex history that antedated the arrival of English speaking people. The unit includes background materials that provide an overview, lesson plans, and student resources. (Bt)
The golden age of Greece : imperial democracy 500-400 B.C. : a unit of study for grades 6-12 by Peter Cheoros( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit explores Greece's most glorious century, the high point of Athenian culture. Rarely has so much genius been concentrated in one small region over such a short period of time. Students discover in studying Greece's Classical Age many aspects of their own heritage. Present day ideas of government, philosophy, literature, science, and aesthetics can be linked directly back to Ancient Greece. Without an awareness of this remarkable heritage and an appreciation for the creativity of the period, along with an appreciation of other ancient civilizations, students cannot begin to understand enduring values and the creative power of humankind. While studying the unit students also become aware of the conflicts in human values that are an enduring and unavoidable part of human society. In this unit students will explore various aspects of the remarkable culture of imperial Athens. They study the origin of Athenian naval power during the Persian Wars, learn how Athenians passed laws, contemplate the brilliance of Athenian imperial culture as reflected in the Parthenon, examine its decline in the Peloponnesian War, and consider the nature of Athenian citizenship and its problems as illustrated by the institution of ostracism, Sophocles' play "Antigone," and the trial of Socrates. A chronological table of Greek politics and culture from 750 to 400 B.C. is included. Contains 37 references. (Author/DK)
The Constitution in crisis : the Red Scare of 1919-1920 : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by David Vigilante( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. Continuing narrative provides context for the dramatic moment. By studying a crucial turning-point in history, students become aware that choices had to be made by real human beings, that those decisions were the result of specific factors, and that they set in motion a series of historical consequences. The lessons are based on primary sources, taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. By analyzing primary sources, students will learn how to analyze evidence, establish a valid interpretation, and construct a coherent narrative in which all the relevant factors play a part. This unit is designed to help students recognize that the guarantees of the Bill of Rights are fragile and must be secured by a commitment to principles. When exaggerated fears of political, racial, or ethnic groups are encouraged, the basic freedoms of Americans can be lost. By studying the anticommunist hysteria of 1919-20 students come to understand the historical context in which the "Red Scare" occurred, evaluate the impact of the wartime Espionage Act and Sedition Act on free speech guaranteed in the First Amendment, explain related U.S. Supreme Court decisions, recognize the importance of dissent in a free society, analyze the impact of fear on society, and recognize the long range impact of policy decisions on internal affairs. This unit contains teacher background materials, lesson plans, and student resources and handouts. (Dk)
With Speech as My Weapon: Emma Goldman and the First Amendment. a Unit of Study for Grades 8-12 by Candace Falk( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This supplementary teaching unit provides students with the opportunity to explore freedom of expression by focusing on Emma Goldman (1869-1940), a major figure in the history of American radicalism and feminism. In a period when the expression of controversial ideas was dangerous, Goldman insisted on her right to challenge conventions. She devoted her life to asserting the individual's potential for freedom that otherwise was obscured by a system of social and economic constraints. She was among America's most prominent advocates of labor's right to organize, reproductive rights, sexual freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom of the individual. This teaching unit contains primary sources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. Students will investigate documents drawn from these sources in a study of issues related to freedom of expression. Teacher background materials, lesson plans, and student resources are given to provide an overview of the entire unit, as well as various ideas and approaches for this unit. Contains a glossary of terms and an 18-item selected bibliography. (Bt)
Keeping them apart : Plessy v. Ferguson and the black experience in post-Reconstruction America : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Jim Ruderman( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit focuses on the black experience in the critical years after Reconstruction. Using the landmark decision in Plessy V. Ferguson in 1896, the unit opens with an examination of conditions in black America during the post-Reconstruction years. Political opportunities or lack thereof; economic and class status; as well as social interaction will be illustrated through documentary material. In the Plessy case, the U.S. Supreme Court interpreted the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees of due process and equal protection to mean that "separate but equal" facilities could be provided on the basis of race. By examining the Supreme Court's reasoning in Plessy within the historical context of the period, the student will be able to evaluate the successes and the failures of Reconstruction. By examining the Court's decision itself, students can investigate the nature of judicial review through an example of constitutional interpretation that stands in sharp contrast to the judicial activist character of the Warren Court's decision in Brown V. Board of Education nearly 60 years later. This unit challenges students to see the relationship between law and society and how prejudice works. The unit objectives are: students will evaluate the conditions of blacks in the north and south between 1875 and 1900 using documentary and statistical evidence; the successes and failures of Reconstruction for freedmen will be analyzed; students will identify Plessy V. Ferguson as an organized resistance by black leaders to segregation laws in the south; the Supreme Court's reasoning in this decision will be analyzed and; the concept of judicial review and its importance in American Constitutional government will be identified and discussed. Contains three references. (Dk)
Abraham Lincoln and slavery : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Kirk Ankeney( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This document is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. Students become aware that choices had to be made by real human beings, that those decisions were the result of specific factors, and that they set in motion a series of historical consequences. By analyzing primary sources, students learn how to analyze evidence, establish a valid interpretation, and construct a coherent narrative in which all the relevant factors play a part. This unit explores Abraham Lincoln's attitudes and actions regarding slavery, its abolition, and the use of African American troops during the Civil War. The unit places Lincoln's words and deeds amid the political realities of the day and in the context of the time in which he lived. Contemporary voices of both support and opposition draw attention to public reaction to Lincoln's policies. The unit consists of teacher background materials, lesson plans, and accompanying student resources. Unit objectives include: (1) to interpret documents in their historical context; (2) to understand the significance of the debate over the abolition of slavery and the use of African American troops; (3) to examine the historical context of emancipation; and (4) to explore the political motivation that influenced Lincoln's stance on slavery. Five lesson plans and one extension lesson are included: (1) Lincoln's early views on slavery; (2) the Lincoln-Douglas Debates; (3) evolution of an anti-slavery policy; (4) emancipation and African American troops; (5) contemporary views of Lincoln; and artists' views of the Emancipation Proclamation. Contains 13 references. (Dk)
Causes of the American Revolution : focus on Boston : a unit of study for grades 7-12 by David Lynn Ghere( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This teaching unit is based on primary sources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study, which, in this case, is the beginning of the Revolutionary period in the American colonies. The unit addresses the intellectual foundations, the emotional attitudes, and the specific political events that combined to create an imperial crisis between Great Britain and her colonies in the early 1760s and 1770s. It also provides material that can be used to promote a better understanding of economic and social relations during the same period. The primary goal for the unit is to present teaching materials for easy use in the secondary classroom while retaining the logical argumentation, the "rich flowery language," and the"burning emotion" that is contained in the original documents. By studying a crucial turning point in history, the student becomes aware of decisions that were made by real human beings, and that the decisions set in motion a series of historical consequences. Within the unit, which should be used as a supplement to the customary course materials, are the following: (1) unit objectives; (2) correlation to the National History Standards; (3) teacher background materials; (4) lesson plans; and (5) student resources. The unit's lesson plans include a variety of ideas and approaches for the teacher which can be elaborated upon or shortened. The lesson plans contain student resources. (Bt)
Bring history alive! : a sourcebook for teaching United States history by Kirk Ankeney( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This resource manual, built around 1,200 classroom activities, was created by elementary, middle, and high school teachers for teachers who wish to engage in an inquiry-based approach to historical knowledge and historical understanding. The teaching examples are offered as sample activities and are not considered to be a complete curriculum. The teaching examples are organized by grade level and era and are supplemented by essays of two types. In Part I, a number of short essays by experienced teachers explore ways of bringing history alive. In Part ii, essays introduce each of the 10 eras of United States history. Each essay dwells on a particular theme or approach relevant to the era. The 10 eras are borrowed from the "National Standards for United States History" and encompass the chronological study of U.S. history presented in the schools. (Eh)
The Byzantine Empire in the Age of Justinian by Linda Karen Miller( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The 6th century of the Byzantine Empire, dominated by the emperor Justinian (527-565 C.E.), is the focus of this unit of lessons designed for grades 7-12. Justinian's contributions to world history in various fields are examined. Noting that not all scholars are in agreement as to when Byzantine history began, the unit places its origins either at the time of Constantine the Great (324-337 C.E.), or at the reign of Justinian. The unit begins with an overview and rationale and then provides the following teacher background materials: a unit context, a correlation to the National History Standards, unit objectives, and six lesson plans. Topics for the lesson plans include geography of the empire, Nika Revolt, Vandal wars in Africa, Justinian as a law reformer, Byzantine architecture, and Justinian and Theodora. Each lesson contains student activity questions. Primary source materials are provided, along with a 23-item bibliography. (Bt)
Slavery in the 19th century : a unit of study for grades 5-8 by J. D Pearson( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that presents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. The lessons included in this unit attempt to make slavery comprehensible to students, showing its oppressiveness and yet explaining how white Southern culture rationalized and sustained it. The unit also explains how blacks resisted the dehumanizing aspects of slavery and in the process created a distinct African American culture. Finally these lessons present the abolitionists, black and white, male and female, and develop appreciation for their courage, conviction, and understanding. Students should be exposed to people whose foresight and principles, while putting them at odds with the prevailing beliefs of their contemporaries, helped to shape the attitudes of future Americans. This unit should help students see the importance of being active and thoughtful members of society. White Southerners were ordinary people not very different from contemporary Americans. Students should be taught that unless people are educated to reflect actively on the values that shape society, they are likely to accept those values uncritically. With the aid of this unit, students should see racism as a disease that threatens all people's freedom while crippling the judgement of those infected. This unit contains six lesson plans: (1) the justification of slavery and its effect on whites; (2) slave labor; (3) African-American culture forged in bondage; (4) slave resistance; (5) abolition, the leaders and their ideas; and (6) abolition and women's rights. Contains 16 references. (Dk)
Mansa Musa, African king of gold : a unit of study for grades 7-9 by Joe Palumbo( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that presents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit challenges the idea that Africa was backward and unknown to the outside world before the arrival of the Europeans. It shows that strong leadership and well organized societies had existed in Africa long before European colonialism. Here, as in medieval Europe, kings' strength and respectability heavily depended on the material wealth they possessed. They shared this wealth among their most loyal followers, who in turn shared it among those they ruled or commanded. One of the greatest and most far reaching empires of the later middle ages was in West Africa. The kingdom of Mali stunned both the Muslim and the Christian worlds with its wealth, power, and influence. One of Mali's greatest leaders, the emperor Mansa Musa awakened the world to Mali's greatness in 1324 on his pilgrimage to Mecca when he spent and distributed so much gold that it deflated its price in Cairo for the next 12 years. Several Arab scholars were so impressed by this man that they followed him back to Mali to investigate further this amazing civilization. The writings of these scholars serve as the primary source documents for this unit. Through the examination, interpretation, and synthesis of these writings, students will be able to draw conclusions about the people and culture of Mali, the role of the emperor, and the nature of Mansa Musa himself. Contains seven references. (Author/DK)
Women in the Progressive Era : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Alli Jason( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A specific dramatic episode in history that allows students to delve into the deeper meanings of selected landmark events and explore a wider context of historical narrative is represented within this supplementary teaching unit. This approach helps students materialize history as an ongoing, open-ended process that is based upon decisions made in the present. The role of women during the Progressive era in the United States (1890 - 1920) is the focus of this unit. Unit topics include: (1) social conditions that led to women's assumption of wider roles in the public arena during the Progressive era; (2) the impact of higher education for African American women and white middle-class women; (3) methods women used to exert influence in the public arena, including the women's club movement, settlement houses, and labor organizations; (4) differences and tensions between middle-class women reformers and their working-class clients; and (5) individuals, organizations, and events that led to popular acceptance of birth control and suffrage. The guide is based on primary sources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. Teacher background materials, lesson plans, and student resources are given to provide an overview of the entire unit, as well as various ideas and approaches for this unit. Contains 15 suggested reading resources. (Bt)
The role of women in medieval Europe : a unit of study for grades 10-12 by Rhoda Himmell( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit consists of lessons focused on selected topics in medieval history that define and describe the roles of women. The lessons examine the roles of women in the Early Middle Ages with particular emphasis on the culture of the Germanic tribes that penetrated the Roman Empire, property rights of women in the feudal framework, the participation of women in the expansion of cultural and intellectual pursuits in the 11th through 13th centuries, and demographics and the occupational roles of women in the late Middle Ages. A role playing project that applies to several important topics of the Middle Ages and that includes many female roles is included. The unit is designed with five objectives: (1) to identify and describe some important and prominent roles that women played in medieval social, economic, and political life; (2) to understand that women's roles varied according to time, place, and circumstance throughout the medieval period; (3) to recognize that male attitudes established more or less the place of women within the framework of medieval society; (4) to gain experience in the analysis of primary source documents as a fundamental aspect of history; and (5) to practice formulation of generalizations from specific descriptive materials. The unit contains a 15-item annotated bibliography. (Dk)
Commemorative sculpture in the United States : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by James A Percoco( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using primary source documents, this teaching unit focuses on the role monuments and memorials play in the culture. Teacher background materials include a unit overview and unit context, correlation to National Standards for United States History, unit objectives, a lesson plan list, and historical background on commemorative sculpture in the United states. Six lessons include: (1) "Commemoration in the American Democracy"; (2) "An Enduring American Image--'The Minutemen'"; (3) "The American Pantheon"; (4) "Icons of the West"; (5) "Soldiers of the Civil War"; and (6) "The Creation of a National Shrine--The Lincoln Memorial." Each lesson includes a variety of ideas and approaches for implementation, student resources in the form of primary source documents, handouts, and a bibliography. (Mm )
The beginning of civilization in Sumer : the advent of written communication : a unit of study for grades 5-8 by Joan Parrish-Major( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This document is a unit for introducing students to the achievements and historical significance of the Sumerian civilization, located in Mesopotamia, "the land between the rivers," in present day Iraq, and reaching back in time to approximately 3500 bc. Divided into 5 sections, the unit's first three sections concentrate on historical readiness activities and concepts, geographical historical awareness, and an overview of recognized "firsts" in Sumerian civilizations. The last 2 sections focus on the most significant achievement of the Sumerians, the development and use of a written language, and provide an in-depth exploration of this ancient writing system and the life of an average scribe. The unit aims to help students develop an awareness of and an appreciation for the uniquely human achievement of written communication, and provides students with a concept of historical firsts, guiding the students to understand the interrelationship between geography, human adaptation, human lifestyles, and historical change. In the first lesson, students create and discuss personal and familial time lines, exploring the concepts of continuity, change, and historical firsts. In the second lesson students examine maps of the present day Middle East and then identify the general area of the ancient Fertile Crescent and the specific area known as ancient Sumer. Activities in the third lesson generate discussion of the importance and unique nature of written communication. In the fourth lesson, students examine a moment in time as they read primary source documents on the life of a scribe and then role play. In the fifth and last section, students examine the evolution of the ancient writing system of cuneiform. (Author/DK)
The Freedmen's Bureau: catalyst for freedom? : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Rita G Koman( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Within this supplementary teaching unit, students investigate primary source documents to evaluate federal government policy regarding the transition of some four million African Americans from slavery to freedom at the conclusion of the Civil War. Lessons in the unit examine the political debate over the establishment of the Freedmen's Bureau, its goals, the problems encountered in pursuing stated goals, and an evaluation of its effectiveness. Noting that this paternalistic role assumed by the first federal welfare agency is not given much attention in textbooks, the unit discusses the debate over the depth of government involvement in the lives of freed persons and the politicians' feelings that the government should shoulder a broad responsibility to remodel Southern society and instigate a new racial order. The teaching unit is based on primary sources taken from federal legislation, bureau records, land regulations, labor contracts, letters, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. Students are actively involved in a military hearing using evidence culled from official transcripts. Within this unit are: (1) unit objectives; (2) correlation to the National History Standards; (3) teacher background materials (which provide an overview of the entire unit); (4) lesson plans (which include a variety of ideas and approaches); and (5) student resources. Contains a 17-item selected bibliography. (Bt)
In the aftermath of war : cultural clashes of the twenties : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Nina Gifford( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This unit is a collection of lessons for teaching about cultural clashes. Based on primary sources, the unit contains teacher background materials and three lesson plans with student resources. These lessons deal with the United States between World War I and World War ii. The United States emerged from World War I with seismic faults in its society, with clashes that would reverberate through the decade and beyond. A study of the contrast between modern urban and traditional rural society can help students grasp the era's great complexity and give them insights into different cultural attitudes that still exist in U.S. society. Using a variety of documents, plus cooperative and individual instructional activities that emphasize critical thinking, students examine the attitudes and strategies of people struggling with competing world views. Art, literature, and film also are used to illustrate key points. The unit is built on three objectives: (1) to identify social and economic changes that had been occurring in the United States since the late 19th century; (2) to identify reactions to the social and economic changes that had been occurring; and (3) to recognize that the emergence of new beliefs and attitudes produce tensions and conflicts in society. The first lesson plan, "Urban America in the Twenties," allows students to identify social and economic trends in the early 20th century, describe urban modernism in the 1920's, and reactions to it. The second lesson, "Rural Traditionalism in the Twenties," helps students describe rural traditionalism in the 1920's and reactions. The third lesson contains case studies. Contains three references. (Author/DK)
 
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