WorldCat Identities

National Election Studies (États-Unis)

Overview
Works: 20 works in 25 publications in 1 language and 45 library holdings
Genres: Software 
Classifications: JK1968, 324.9730927
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by National Election Studies (États-Unis)
American national election study : pooled Senate election study, 1988, 1990, 1992 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection, focusing on Senate elections, combines data from a three-part series (1988, 1990, 1992) of Senate studies. Over the course of these three elections voters in each of the 50 states were interviewed, and data were gathered on citizen evaluations of all senators at three stages of their six-year election cycles. Both survey data and contextual data for all 50 states are included. The survey data facilitate the comparison of House of Representatives and Senate races through the use of questions that generally parallel those questions used in election studies since 1978 concerning respondents' interaction with and evaluation of candidates for the House of Representatives. However, because of redistricting in the early 1990s, the congressional districts for the 1992 respondents could not be pre-identified. The survey instrument was, therefore, redesigned to some degree, cutting some of the House-related content for the 1992 survey. The 50-state survey design also allows for the comparison of respondents' perceptions and evaluation of senators who were up for re-election with those in the second or fourth years of their terms. Topics covered include respondent's recall and like/dislike of House and Senate candidates, issues discussed in the campaigns, contact with House and Senate candidates/incumbents, respondent's opinion of the proper roles for senators and representatives, a limited set of issue questions, liberal/conservative self-placement, party identification, media exposure, and demographic information. Contextual data presented include election returns for the Senate primary and general elections, voting indices for the years 1983-1992, information about the Senate campaign such as election outcome predictions, campaign pollster used, and spending patterns, and demographic, geographic, and economic data for the state. Also included are derived... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09580.xml
American national election study, 1994 : post-election survey [enhanced with 1992 and 1993 data] by Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1994 National Election Study is a post-election interview in which approximately 42 percent of the cases are comprised of empaneled respondents first interviewed in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067) and later in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1992-1993 PANEL STUDY ON SECURING ELECTORAL SUCCESS/1993 PILOT STUDY (ICPSR 6264). The other 58 percent of the cases are a freshly drawn cross-section sample. The panel component of the study is designed to exploit the special features of the 1992-1994 elections: a minority president struggling to forge a majority coalition in the face of a strong third-party challenge, and the replacement in 1992 of fully one-quarter of the House of Representatives. Coming at the end of this period, the 1994 National Election Study provides insights into how electoral coalitions form and decay, and how members of the House who were newly-elected in 1992 secured -- or did not secure -- their districts. The design themes became especially salient in the aftermath of the November 8 election, when control of the Congress shifted to the Republican Party for the first time since 1952. Survey questions included the now-standard National Election Studies battery of congressional evaluations supplemented by questions on term limits, the respondent's representative's vote on President Bill Clinton's crime bill, and whether the respondent felt that his or her representative cared more about pre... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/06507.xml
American National Election Study, 2000 Pre- and Post-Election Survey( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES) entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election reinterview. A freshly drawn cross- section of the electorate was taken to yield 1,807 cases. Because the study includes a carefully designed mode experiment, the data represent two presidential studies in 2000, side by side. The core study preserves the past commitment to probability area sampling and face-to-face interviewing: 1,000 respondents were interviewed prior to the election and 694 were reinterviewed face-to-face after the election. Supporting the core study, random-digit dial sampling and telephone interviewing were used: 803 respondents were interviewed by phone prior to the election and 862 respondents were interviewed by phone after the election. As such, the experiment examines the differences between the two modes and provides a preview of what shifting to telephone interviewing will mean for the NES time-series. The content of the 2000 election study reflects its dual purpose as a traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a mode study. Many of the substantive themes included in the 2000 questionnaires are a continuation of past topics. Interest in politics and the election was examined through questions regarding interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, and information about politics. Respondents' knowledge of candidates and the political parties was ascertained through que... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03131.xml
American National Election Study, 1978 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In this post-election survey, major emphasis was placed on the respondent's evaluation of their congressional district's candidates, both the incumbent and opponent, along several dimensions. As in previous American National Election studies, this survey included a series of questions on the media coverage of the campaigns and scales that measured the respondent's positions on major social issues, including urban unrest, protection of the rights of the accused, aid to minority groups, government insurance plan, and women's role in society. The perceived position of the political parties, as well as certain political leaders, on these issues was also ascertained. In addition to the survey data, this file also contains several contextual components consisting of: (1) historical election returns at the state, congressional district, and county levels for elections to the offices of president, governor, and United States senator and representative, 1972-1976, (2) 1978 election returns for primary and general elections to the same offices, including precinct level returns, (3) voter validation variables, (4) information about media structure in the respondent's locale, (5) incumbent characteristics, including information pertaining to the incumbent U.S. representatives of the 95th Congress from the 108 congressional districts sampled in the survey (a major feature of this component is a series of performance ratings that each member of Congress received from certain interest groups and from the Congressional Quarterly), (6) candidate characteristics that apply to the Democratic and Republican candidates for the office of U.S. representative in the 1978 general elections (the latter data were obtained from a 1978 candidate questionnaire that was administered by Congressional Quarterly, Inc.), (7) information prepared by the Federal Election Commission on campaign expenditures and contributions for the offices of U.S. senator and U.S. representative, and (8) U.S. Census Bureau data containing social, economic, and demographic information recorded for the respondent's place of residence. Some of the Census data present information at the congressional district level drawn from the Congressional District Data Book (93rd Congress), as well as county-level Census tabulations prepared from the 1972 County and City Data Book. Additional information includes campaign materials collected from the headquarters of the Democratic and Republican congressional candidates, such as what types of campaign material existed and in how many varieties. Additionally, thematic dimensions of the campaign were coded from the campaign materials
American National Election Study, 1990 [public opinion, voting behavior, United States] by Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection, focusing on the 1990 Senate elections, is part of a planned three-part series (1988, 1990, 1992) of Senate studies. Over the course of the three elections, voters in each of the 50 states will be interviewed, and data will be gathered on citizen evaluations of all senators at each stage of their six-year election cycles. In this collection, as in the 1988 Senate Study, contextual data for all 50 states have been merged with the survey data. The survey data facilitate the comparison of House of Representatives and Senate races through the use of questions that generally parallel those questions used in election studies since 1978 concerning respondents' interaction with and evaluation of candidates for the House of Representatives. The 50-state survey design also allows for the comparison of respondents' perceptions and evaluations of senators who are up for re-election with those in the second or fourth years of their terms. Topics covered include respondent's recall and like/dislike of House and Senate candidates, issues discussed in the campaigns, contact with House and Senate candidates/incumbents, respondent's opinion of the proper roles for senators and representatives, a limited set of issue questions, liberal/conservative self-placement, party identification, media exposure, and demographic information. Contextual data presented include election returns for the Senate primary and general elections, voting indices for the years 1983-1990, information about the Senate campaign such as election outcome predictions, campaign pollster used, spending patterns, and demographic, geographic, and economic data for the state. Derived measures also are included that reorganize the House of Representatives and Senate variables by party of candidate and incumbency/challenger status of candidate, and, for Senate variables only,... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09549.xml
American national election study, 1984 1983 pilot survey( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This pilot was conducted to develop new instrumentation for segments of the 1984 American National Election Study. New items were tested on several topics including economic well-being, group identification, values, political participation, and candidate affect. Telephone interviews were conducted in July, with reinterviews in August
American National Election Study, 1984 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Part 1 of this collection contains the traditional Pre- and Post-Election Survey (ICPSR Version). Interviews were conducted in person prior to the 1984 election. In the post-election wave, half of the respondents were randomly assigned to be reinterviewed in person, and the other half to be reinterviewed by telephone using a shortened version of the questionnaire. In addition to the standard core questions, new topic areas (most of which had been piloted in 1983) included measures of "predispositions" such as economic individualism and egalitarianism, and group identification items. Vote validation data also are provided. Part 2, Continuous Monitoring: January 11, 1984, Through December 31, 1984, was designed to examine the impact of the election campaign on voters' perceptions, beliefs, and preferences. Respondents were questioned about their knowledge of the candidates' stands on the issues, about their own stand on the issues, and about their opinions and evaluations of the candidates. Interviews were conducted by telephone throughout the year, with a total of 46 separate cross-section samples selected by a random-digit dialing design, and an average of 76 respondents interviewed in each of the 46 sample weeks. Although the survey instrument was very much the same from one sample week to the next, some questions were deleted and others added during the course of the campaign, as issues became more or less relevant. Thirteen versions of the questionnaire were incorporated into this data file.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/08298.xml
American National Election Study, 1998 Post-Election Survey( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Substantive themes of the 1998 election study include, among others, knowledge and evaluation of the House candidates and placement of the candidates on various issue dimensions, interest in the political campaigns, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, media use, evaluation of the mass media, vote choice, partisanship, and evaluations of the political parties and the party system. Additional items focused on political participation, political mobilization, evaluations of the president and Congress, the ''Lewinsky affair,'' egalitarianism, moral traditionalism, political trust, political efficacy, ideology, cultural pluralism, and political knowledge. Respondents were also asked about their attitudes toward a wide range of issues, including social policy, race policy, military and foreign policy, immigration, foreign imports, prayer in schools, school vouchers, the environment, the death penalty, women's rights, abortion, and religion and politics, including new measures of explicitly political and religious orientations. Demographic items such as age, sex, nationality, marital status, employment status, occupation, and education were also included.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/02684.xml
American national election study, 1980 : June/July (P-2) survey : codebook by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1980 Election Study is comprised of several integrated survey data collections occurring at strategically chosen periods in the course of the election year, along with vote validation and contextual data. Four areas were targeted for special attention: new measurement of party identification, the measurement of voter attitudes concerning issues of public policy, new content concerning public perceptions of and responses to political leadership, and the exploration of social networks in the crystallization of the vote choice. The National Election Studies Board established a 1980 Presidential Elections Committee that consisted of three Board members (Merrill Shanks, John Jackson, David Sears) and three additional scholars (Richard S. Brody, Jack Dennis, Donald R. Kinder). This committee, along with the Center for Political Studies project staff, was responsible for the planning of the year-long study. Part 2, the Pre- and Post-Election Surveys file [C-3/C3po], contains the traditional election survey data. Contextual measures provided along with the survey data include election returns, interest group ratings of incumbents, and Federal Election Commission campaign contribution data. Part 4, the Major Panel File [P1-P4], presents a year-long four-wave panel. The panel began in late January 1980 as a national cross-section of 1,008 cases, and interviewing ended before the New Hampshire primary on February 24, 1980. Respondents from the first wave [P-1] were reinterviewed in June immediately aft... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/07763.xml
American National Election Study, 1996 : Pre- and Post-Election Survey by Steven J Rosenstone( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952, designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1996 National Election Study contains both pre- and post-election components. The Pre-Election Survey includes interviews in which approximately 77 percent of the cases are comprised of impanelled respondents first interviewed in either AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067) or in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1994: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1992 AND 1993 DATA] (ICPSR 6507). The other 23 percent of the pre-election cases are a freshly drawn cross-section sample. Of the 1,714 citizens interviewed during the pre-election stage, 1,534 (89.5 percent) also participated in the Post-Election Survey (1,197 of these were panel cases and 337 were cross-section). The content of the 1996 Election Study reflects its dual function, both as the traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a panel study. Substantive themes presented in the 1996 questionnaires included interest in topics such as political campaigns, evaluations of the political parties, knowledge of and evaluation of presidential and House candidates, political participation (including turnout in the presidential primaries and in the November general election and other forms of electoral campaign activity), and vote choice for president, the United States House of Representatives, and the United States Senate, including second choice for president. Additional items focused on perceptions of personal and national economic well-being, positions on... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/06896.xml
American National Election Study, 1990 : Post-Election Survey by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. For this collection, two forms of the survey instrument were used, with about 75 percent of the content being the same on both forms. Survey questions included the now standard National Election Studies battery of questions, along with items on presidential performance and the Persian Gulf conflict. Additionally, Form A contained questions relating to values and individualism, while Form B had content relating to foreign relations. The file also contains post-election vote validation and election administration survey data. Information is provided concerning sampling data, disposition of the case, control record variables, and information about the interviewer for the 1,980 interviews, plus nonsample and noninterview cases. Each of these records is associated with one or more call records that provide information on the date, day of the week, time of the call and its disposition, and the nature of the contact for those calls that resulted in contact with someone in the sample household ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09548
American National Election Study : 1992-1993 Panel Study on Securing Electoral Success/1993 Pilot Study by Steven J Rosenstone( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This data collection currently encompasses two waves. The first wave is the 1992 Post-Election Survey. In addition to the standard or core content items, respondents were asked their positions on social issues such as altruism, abortion, the death penalty, prayer in the schools, the rights of homosexuals, sexual harassment, women's rights, and feminist consciousness. Other substantive themes included racial and ethnic stereotypes, opinions on school integration and affirmative action, attitudes toward immigrants (particularly Hispanics and Asians), opinions on immigration policy and bilingual education, assessments of United States foreign policy goals, and United States involvement in the Persian Gulf War. The second wave of this panel, the 1993 Pilot Study, was in the field approximately one year after the first wave. It reexamined a number of items from the 1992 study to give as complete a picture as possible of how President Clinton was faring in the eyes of the coalition that had elected him. It also sought to explore in more detail the strength and depth of the Ross Perot phenomenon and, in particular, the reasons behind his continued support. Finally, this second wave of the panel continued the tradition of all pilot studies in seeking to carry out research and development work for the subsequent year's election study. In this regard, the Pilot Study explored the perceived interests of several groups (e.g., wealthy, poor, middle class, Blacks, whites) in areas such as na... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/06264.xml
American National Election Study, 2002 Pre- and Post-Election Survey( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2002 American National Election Study (ANES) is the first mid-year study to include a pre-election in addition to post-election interview. It is also the first NES study conducted entirely by telephone. Since NES questions are generally designed for face-to-face interviewing, a number of time-series questions were modified to enhance the validity and reliability of data obtained through telephone interviews. Special content for 2002 includes questions on the terrorist attacks of 2001 (and presidential and military response to the attacks), the election contest of 2000, and special modules on economic inequality, specifically gender and racial differences in jobs and income inequality. In a continuation of past topics, respondents were asked about their choice for president, the United States House of Representatives, and the United States Senate. Respondents were also queried about their approval of Bush's handling of the presidency, the economy, and foreign relations. Questions also included feeling thermometers on the United States Congress, the military, the federal government, political figures (George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Al Gore, Joseph Lieberman, Ralph Nader, Bill Clinton, Colin Powell, John Ashcroft, Jesse Jackson, Laura Bush, and Hillary Clinton), and political constituencies (such as Blacks, Whites, conservatives, liberals, big business, people on welfare, Hispanics, Christian fundamentalists, older people, environmentalists, gay men and lesbians, and the news media). The NES 2002... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03740.xml
American national election studies, 1982 post-election survey file( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In addition to the usual content, other items included an evaluation of President Ronald Reagan's performance in office, his personal qualities, and the respondent's own feelings toward him
American National Election Study, 1990-1992 : Full Panel Survey by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This collection includes respondents who were first interviewed following the November 1990 general election (see AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1990: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ICPSR VERSION] [ICPSR 9548]), and then reinterviewed in two subsequent surveys: AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1990-1991 PANEL STUDY OF THE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF WAR/1991 PILOT STUDY [ICPSR VERSION] (ICPSR 9673) and AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067). The purpose of this panel study is to trace the fortunes of the Bush presidency, from post-Gulf War height to November election defeat, and to provide insight into the origins of the Bill Clinton and Ross Perot coalitions. It also allows the panel analyst to do a traditional assessment of panel attrition which is not possible with any of the collections mentioned above. In 1990, respondents answered questions on topics such as presidential performance, the Persian Gulf War, values and individualism, and foreign relations. Post-election vote validation and election administration survey data are also included. In 1991, respondents were reinterviewed several months after hostilities in the Persian Gulf ended. The survey content consisted of a repeat of a subset of questions from the 1990 Post-Election Survey, and additional items especially relevant to the Gulf War. A number of contextual variables also are provided, including summary variables that combine the respondent... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/06230.xml
American National Election Study, 1988 : 1987 Pilot Study( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This pilot was designed to test instrumentation for the 1988 American National Election Study. The study carries new measures of foreign policy attitudes, system support, and morality. A significant portion of the study is devoted to experiments in question wording and question order effects
American National Election Study : 1990-1991 Panel Study of the Political Consequences of War/1991 Pilot Study by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The panel portion of this collection focuses on the consequences of war, with the first wave consisting of the 1990 Post-Election Survey conducted prior to the outbreak of hostilities in the Persian Gulf. The respondents were reinterviewed several months after hostilities ended, and in this wave the survey content consisted of a repeat of a subset of questions from the Post-Election Survey, and additional items especially relevant to the Gulf War conflict. In addition, a full-fledged pilot study, designed to explore new areas of interest and develop new instrumentation, is embedded in this collection. Among the topics covered in the Pilot portion of the survey are ethnic politics, gender, Social Security, Medicaid/medical care for the elderly, social altruism, and political knowledge. A number of contextual variables also are provided, including summary variables that combine the respondent's recall of his or her senator's and representative's vote on the use of force with that congressperson's actual vote, and county-level 1980 Census data on race.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09673.xml
American national election studies cumulative data file, 1948-2004( )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection pools common variables from each of the biennial National Election Studies conducted since 1948. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The data provided in this cumulative file include a series of demographic variables and measures of social structure, partisanship, candidate evaluation, retrospective and incumbent presidential evaluation, public opinion, ideological support for the political system, mass media usage, and equalitarianism and post-materialism. Additional items provide measures of political activity, participation, and involvement, and voting behavior and registration (including results of vote validation efforts). In 2001, corrections were made to variables VCF0902, VCF0904, and VCF0905
American national election study, 1986 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In addition to core items, new content includes questions on values, political knowledge, and attitudes on racial policy, as well as more general attitudes conceptualized as antecedent to these opinions on racial issues. The file also contains vote validation data that were expanded to include information from the appropriate election office and were attached to the records of each of the respondents in the post-election survey. The expanded data consist of the respondent's post case ID, vote validation ID, and two variables to clarify the distinction between the office of registration and the office associated with the respondent's sample address ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/08678.xml
American National Election Study, 1998 : Post-Election Survey by Warren E Miller( )

6 editions published between 1986 and 2000 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1989 Pilot Study, like its predecessors, provides an opportunity to refine existing National Election Study measures and to develop and test new instrumentation. These data include new measures of religious identity and the political salience of religion, media exposure and the type of information recalled, and individualism represented by predispositions to autonomy, self-reliance, laissez-faire, and limited government. A significant portion of the study is devoted to experiments contrasting different instrumentation for issue questions. New items on gun control, abortion, and the Alaska oil spill also are included.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09295.xml
 
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