WorldCat Identities

! University of Georgia.! College of Education.! Department of Counseling and Human Development Services

Overview
Works: 43 works in 43 publications in 1 language and 43 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by ! University of Georgia.! College of Education.! Department of Counseling and Human Development Services
Exploring the lived experiences of homeless college students : alumni reflections about persistence by India Lucretia Blackburn( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Homeless students who attend college often find it difficult to persist to graduation. The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to explore the phenomenon of college students who experienced homelessness and illustrate the essence of homeless college students' experiences by eliciting and examining the factors that contribute to homeless college students' persistence to graduation. Seven formerly homeless college student alumni participated by providing their description of the factors that supported their persistence to graduation. This study found five themes related to how the participants experienced homelessness while pursuing an education, and how the institutional environment contributed to their ability to persist in college. The themes included: the institutional obligation to homeless college students; the campus environment; emotional support; the strengths of homeless college students; and the needs of homeless college students. Using these themes as a guide, the study identified recommendations to support homeless college students' persistence and academic success. The recommendations included providing greater institutional support, the importance of identifying an institutional agent, making financial resources available, and extending the hours for campus offices and services. It was recommended that future studies explore identified barriers to persistence for homeless college students, along with their tenacity, financial literacy, fear of disclosure, use of first person language to describe this population and graduation rates. This study contributes to much needed literature on the homeless college student
Professional identity construction of school counselors in rural communities : a phenomenological study by Tameka Oliphant Grimes( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This phenomenological study explores the experiences of school counselors in rural communities navigating their professional identity construction process as early career school counselors. While much is known about the strengths and struggles of school counselors in rural communities, little is known about the process of professional identity construction and how it is impacted by these factors. A transcendental phenomenological approach, using a constructivist lens, was employed to understand elements of this experience. Data collection occurred through semi-structured interviews with six currently practicing school counselors in rural areas of the southeast United States. The transcribed interviews were inductively analyzed through line by line coding procedures. Member checks, bracketing and reflexivity, as well as a coding team, were used to ensure trustworthiness. Findings indicate that the process of professional identity construction of school counselors in rural communities moves from chaotic to confident as expressed through the following themes: (1) triage and chaos, (2) getting the hang of this counselor thing, (3) proactive and prevention-focused, and (4) there is always more to learn. This process is dynamic in nature and the school counselor describes a sense of evolving as new experiences lead them to grow in their professional identity. Elements of the rural context that informed these experiences included (a) a tight-knit community, (b) permeable professional/personal boundaries, and (c) fewer resources. Implications for counselor educators, practicing school counselors in rural communities, and rural school districts are considered
Exploring the identity development of emerging adults with involved parents by Cara Winston Simmons( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Higher education institutions play a pivotal role in student development. Increased parental involvement in the lives of college students demands that higher education professionals engage in important discussions about the role of parents at the post-secondary level (Carney-Hall, 2008; Hamilton, 2016; Wartman & Savage, 2008). A growing discussion on the student-parent relationship in college demonstrates a need for higher education professionals to consider what parental involvement and the role of higher education professionals encompasses on college campuses (Carney-Hall, 2008; Cullaty, 2011; Dunn, 2015; Samuolis, Layburn, & Schiaffino, 2001; Kenny & Donaldson, 1991; Merriman, 2007; Taub, 2008; Wartman & Savage, 2008). This study helps to expand and clarify the changing landscape of parental involvement on college campuses and how parental involvement impacts identity development for emerging adults with involved parents. This qualitative study was conducted at a large public research institution located in the southeastern United States. Research design was informed by phenomenology and utilized semi-structured interviews to collect data from 10 participants. Participants brought in self-selected artifacts which served as the starting topic of the interview. Emerging adulthood (Arnett, 2000; Arnett, 2015) served as the conceptual framework to situate this study. Four phenomena central to understanding parental involvement in higher education also provided context; the phenomena include educational policies that encourage parental involvement at the K-12 level, the media's coverage that publicizes overbearing parents, access to technology and media, and rising post-secondary education costs (Carney-Hall, 2008; Wartman & Savage, 2008). Data were analyzed using qualitative methods, which revealed four themes that represented a developmental progression of identity development for participants. First, participants articulated that parental involvement provided them with a sense of security and stability, which led to the second theme, gaining independence. Third, participants also began to view themselves as adults, and finally, they learned to envision their own adulthood apart from their parents. Through the themes participants expressed that they want, expect, and appreciate frequent parental involvement, and that this involvement helps to facilitate their development, rather than impede it. Implications for practice and future research provide additional guidance to higher education professionals
The perceived legitimacy of hazing behavior scale : a construct validation study with NCAA collegiate coaches by Lauren Elizabeth Bigham( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Hazing continues to persist within college sports despite associated risks and negative consequences. Although a growing amount of research exists on the prevalence, nature, and perceived rational for hazing as reported by student-athletes (Allen & Madden, 2008; Allen & Madden, 2012; Hoover, 1999), relatively less research has been conducted on coaches and their attitudes towards hazing. Given the influential nature of coaches' attitudes on team climate and athletes' behavior (Johnson, 2009; Kavussanu, Roberts, & Ntoumanis, 2002; Kowalski & Waldon, 2010; Ommundsen et al., 2003), the purpose of the present study focused on further evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Perceived Legitimacy of Hazing Behavior (PLHB) Scale, a quantitative measure designed to assess coaches' perceptions of legitimacy towards sport-related hazing behavior. With an evolved understanding of coaches' perceptions of hazing, key organizations and personnel may be better informed when developing interventions and programming. This study utilized a quantitative, non-experimental, survey-based research design with stratified cluster sampling and online data collection. Data analysis included 302 NCAA Division I, II, and III college coaches from across the United States. In addition to assessing discriminant validity by exploring the potential impact of social desirability bias as measured by the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Form X1, the construct validity of the PLHB Scale was examined with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Scale reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. Following data collection and after item parceling, data transformation, and the deletion of item parcel six, an EFA utilizing principal-axis factoring identified a unidimensional factor structure that accounted for 79.86% of the variance. The model appeared to be a good fit and well defined with strong factor loadings and high communalities. In addition to good reliability (.95), the PLHB Scale demonstrated favorable discriminant validity when compared with the MCSDS-X1. While the PLHB Scale continued to demonstrate promising psychometric properties with regards to reliability and construct validity, additional research is needed to confirm the factor structure as well as to establish convergent validity. Additional research implications are discussed, strengths and limitations are reviewed, and recommendations for future research are presented
Psychological factors in determining the allocation of a scholarship for eating disorder treatment by Melissa Ann Will( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Eating disorders can have deleterious effects on both an individual's body and mind. Additionally, the cost of treatment can be steep, often preventing individuals from receiving adequate, consistent, and necessary care. A non-profit organization in the southeastern United States has dedicated efforts to fully funding individuals through eating disorder-inpatient treatment, and accepts applications from individuals around the country. Funding recipients are then financially supported at an approved treatment site for as long as they need. As the financial need of applicants can range from a few hundred dollars to upwards of one-hundred-thousand dollars, the non-profit is limited in the number of scholarships they can provide at any given time. The application process is multi-level, and largely consists of measures self-created by the non-profit organization. There are also three validated measures included: Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire, Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV, and University Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the non-profit based funding decisions on data collected from the three validated measures. This was examined through three hypothetical decision-making models. The three hypothetical models were: Egalitarian Model, Least Severe Model, and Blended Model. Hypothetical funding recipients were selected from each model and compared to the two actual funding recipients. The non-profit aimed to use a Blended Model. Results indicated that those chosen by the non-profit were not selected based on the three validated measures as demonstrated through the three hypothetical decision-making models. The allocation of scarce resources demonstrates to be a challenge on any level, and understanding the decision-making process can further inform organizations on the effectiveness and consistency of their procedures. Implications for practitioners working with eating disorder clients, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed
Resilience, civic engagement, cultural values, perceived discrimination and the unique mental health needs of DACA eligible Mexican immigrants by Jennifer Nicole Merrifield( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mexican immigrants continue to comprise a large portion of the minority population in the United States, yet they remain underrepresented across all sociopolitical domains, including behavioral healthcare and mental health research. This study documents the experiences of Mexican-origin immigrants who are eligible for, or currently enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Qualtrics was used to collect data via online questionnaires completed by 95 adults across the country. Direct and indirect relationships between resilience, perceived ethnic discrimination, civic engagement, and cultural values were examined. An additional aim of this study was to explore the psychological needs of participants and their communities. Therefore, respondents also completed a mental health needs assessment. Initial regression analyses revealed perceived ethnic discrimination and Mexican American cultural values served as significant predictors of resilience. Perceived discrimination was not significantly correlated with resilience; thus, no predictive relationships were found. Familismo accounted for most of the variance in the model among cultural values in predicting resilience. Civic engagement and familismo were the only significant predictors of resiliency in this sample. In addition, two significant interaction effects were found. The first revealed that religious cultural values strengthened the predictive effects of civic engagement on resilience. The second interaction showed that as levels of perceived discrimination levels increased, the relationship between familismo and resilience became stronger. The highest endorsed mental health concerns were Fear of Deportation, Experiencing Discrimination/Racism, Problems regarding Career Choice, and Nervousness. Results of this study lend support for therapeutic efforts that foster familismo values and civic engagement behaviors. In addition, DACA eligible Mexican immigrants may benefit from discussing perceived discrimination with mental health providers
Understanding the experiences of dual enrolled students and the influence on the college admissions decision by D. C Jenkins( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This qualitative research study used Krumboltz's Happenstance Learning Theory (2009) as a framework for understanding the student's dual enrollment experience and the influence on the college admission decision. To understand and make meaning of the lived experiences of dual enrolled students, the study included personal interviews with 13 first-year students who earned college credit through dual enrollment in high school. The study took place at a small, public, four-year university in a rural area of the southeastern United States and identified reasons why dual enrolled students either persist or choose to leave the institution where they earned their dual enrollment credits. Five themes emerged when analyzing the data including college preparedness, financial incentives, college readiness, challenges encountered, and college selection. These insights into the students' dual enrollment experiences may help postsecondary institutions better recruit and retain students
The Inquiry Experience : engaging Seminars for first and second year students by Elizabeth Whittaker Huggins( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Academic engagement plays an integral role in both student learning and student retention. Institutional initiatives, such as "High-Impact Practices" (HIPs), can foster student engagement, increase retention and create deep learning experiences (Kuh, 2008). National Survey for Student Engagement (NSSE) assesses the extent to which students are engaged in educationally purposeful activities; however, students' experiences of engagement are also relevant. To benefit fully, students should participate in at least two high impact practices (Gonyea et al., 2008); however, many students do not have access to this opportunity, especially those who are historically underrepresented (Brownell & Swaner, 2009). The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the extent to which engagement in a required high-impact Inquiry course, designed for first or second year students, affected students' academic engagement. The following questions guided the study: How do students describe their engagement experiences in a high impact course (Inquiry) related specifically to peer and faculty interaction? How does the experience affect engagement in upper division courses? Using a priori coding, this confirmatory, phenomenological study explored engagement using pre-determined NSSE Engagement Indicators: Learning with Peers and Experiences with Faculty. Using five focus groups to collect the data, 17 upper division participants (who had completed Inquiry in their first two years of college), shared engagement experiences. The results indicated that Inquiry participation enhanced engagement skills with both faculty and peers and provided skills to successfully transition into upper division. Because Inquiry is only one credit hour, and student decisions are affected by multiple factors, there was no specific evidence to support that the course influenced retention or major selection; however, it does appear to have enhanced communication with faculty and encouraged peer interaction. Therefore, implementing an Inquiry model for lower division engagement improves both faculty and peer interaction throughout the college experience. This project-based course benefits student success by requiring students to integrate ideas with diverse perspectives, engage with faculty, and participate in collaborative learning. Participants also provided recommendations for improving the course design, reflecting the Inquiry process of asking questions, sharing diverse perspectives and discussing potential solutions
Generativity among LGBT older adults by Kyle Lee Bower( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This research project answers a call to understand more about how societal structures influence the lives of LGBT older adults and addresses the need for recognizing the individuality that exists within this broad LGBT older population. In order to understand who LGBT individuals are in old age, we must first understand the cohort they belong to, as one's past, present, and future are all components of identity⁰́₄i.e. who we were, who we are, and who we hope to be. In addition, past experiences provide important contexts for present decisions and future generativity. To explain social influences, I am exploring the meaning of generativity within the context of historical, individual, familial, and relational culture. By addressing the cultural context of social influences I was able to discern the individuality that constitutes the LGBT population
A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Depression Intervention in Persons with Co-occurring Chronic Migraines by Ashley Joi Britton( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a strong co-occurring relationship between chronic headache disorders and psychiatric disorders ⁰́₃ particularly depression or anxiety. Epidemiological research has determined that headache disorders are the most prevalent neurological conditions, with significant psychosocial impacts on work, interpersonal well-being and recreational functioning. Prior headache research has repeatedly demonstrated that migraine is associated with significant negative impacts, including reduced quality of life, impaired functioning, and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Specifically, compared with migraine or a psychiatric condition alone, having migraine with co-occurring mental health disorders results in poorer health-related outcomes. Approximately 33 to 50% of chronic headache patients have mild to moderate depression; and traditional headache treatment was proven to be less effective in depressed patients. Antidepressants are well-documented for treatment of chronic daily headache disorders, including migraine and chronic tension headaches. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was developed in response to changing conceptualizations of both pain and psychological change mechanisms. The psychology of chronic pain is extensive and ranges from attention control and factors influencing performance of important social roles to aspects of identity construction. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a CBT intervention targeted to treat the depression in a community sample with co-occurring chronic headache disorders, with the goal of also improving the head pain severity and frequency. Relative to their counterparts in the Control Condition, individuals with frequent migraines and who also met diagnosis for a depressive disorder demonstrated significant reduction in depressive symptoms, headache days and headache-related disability immediately after undergoing a 4-session cognitive-behavioral intervention that targeted depression
Understanding race and gender: a phenomenological study of asian american and pacific islander men's experience playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games by Joseph Chunmin Pak( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This interpretative phenomenological study examined the everyday lived experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) men who play massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). The researcher utilized in-depth, semi-structured interviews to elicit stories regarding participants' experiences of playing MMORPGs. In addition, the researcher solicited screenshots of the players' MMORPGs characters. This research seeks to gain insight into AAPI men's lived experiences surrounding race and gender in the context of hegemonic masculinity, and the impact of these experiences on their engagement with massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). This study utilized critical race theory (Delgado & Stefancic, 2001) and hegemonic masculinity (Connell, 1982, 1983) as frameworks through which to analyze the impact of race, and gender on AAPI men's experiences with MMORPGs
Assessing the impact of trauma exposure in juvenile offenders using the rias and tscc by Zoe Elizabeth Ray( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Adolescents involved with the juvenile justice system are significantly more likely to endorse history of childhood maltreatment and other forms of complex trauma. Trauma exposure is associated with a variety of detrimental symptoms, including higher mental health disorder, cognitive deficit, and learning and memory problems than the general population. Adolescence represents a critical period in cognitive development, which is negatively impacted by trauma exposure. Experience of trauma is associated with neurological changes as well as deficits in learning and memory, verbal ability, and executive function. This study investigated the impact of trauma exposure and trauma symptomology on cognitive functioning in juvenile offenders. Participants included adolescents referred by the juvenile court for psychological evaluation. Results of the statistical analyses revealed no relationship between self-report of trauma and endorsement of trauma symptoms on the TSCC. Adolescents who reported history of sexual abuse/rape scored significantly lower on the RIAS Composite Memory Index. Significant correlations were identified between performance on the RIAS and scores on the TSCC. Elevated score on the TSCC Overt Dissociation scale predicted higher performance on the RIAS Verbal Intelligence Index, while elevated score on the TSCC Depression scale predicted higher performance on both the RIAS Nonverbal Intelligence Index and Composite Intelligence Index. In contrast, adolescents with higher TSCC Hyperresponse scale performed significantly worse on the RIAS Composite Memory Index. Overall, 52% of participants reported history of trauma, with females significantly more likely to endorse trauma experience than male offenders. These findings highlight unique challenges that trauma-exposed youth experience related to cognitive functioning and trauma symptomology
First at the top : narratives of college presidents who were first-generation college students by Peter Lucas Paquette( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This narrative inquiry aimed to understand the experiences of college presidents who were first-generation students. Specifically, this study sought to identify the ways first-generation presidents transcended educational and career obstacles, explored their career pathways to the presidency, and recognized the ways first-generation college presidents approached leading institutions of higher education. Harper's (2010) anti-deficit achievement model grounded the study and served to center the research on persistence and resiliency. By participating in narrative interviews, nine college presidents shared accounts of overcoming obstacles and navigating college presidencies. Each individual narrative is presented and analyzed for its own individual themes, followed by thematic analysis across the nine narratives. The distinct themes that emerged from the data included (1) mentors, (2) transcending educational and career obstacles, (3) presidential pathways, and (4) approach as first-generation presidents. Discussion and implications identify the ways the research supports dominant narratives, challenges those narratives, and writes a new narrative for college presidents who were first-generation college students. The research supports that college presidents who come from a first-generation student background are uniquely prepared for the presidency and that they possess a skill-set and demeanor that sets them apart from their non-first-generation peers
An exploratory study of how institutions utilize systems to respond to students who are exhibiting threatening behavior by Douglas Ray Bell( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

When multiple systems are available to address a student's behavior, it is important for administrators to engage the system that will best assist in reaching their desired outcome. This study examines the utilization of systems to address the concerning and threatening behavior of students. The objective of this quantitative study is to identify and describe the composition of the different systems being used to address behavior, while also seeking to understand what behaviors must be present for an institution to determine which system to engage students when multiple systems are available to address their behavior. Findings indicated that institutions utilized a coordinated approach when engaging multiple systems to address threatening behaviors. These multiple systems include behavioral intervention teams, office of student conduct, office of public security/police, counseling and housing/residential life. Finding support the need for further trainings or professional developments regarding their team functions
A critical quantitative exploration of collegiate student-athlete academic involvement by Carrie Virginia Smith( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to utilize critical quantitative methodology to analyze previously collected data by a nationally distributed survey instrument, with the goal of conceptualizing Academic Involvement as it pertains to collegiate student-athletes and their racial and ethnic identities. The researcher selected Critical Race Theory as the foundational critical theory upon which to frame the research design. The researcher requested responses from the 2014 administration of the Your First College Year survey, an instrument produced by the Higher Education Research Institute located at the University of California, Los Angeles. The information collected represented the constructs of (a) Academic Disengagement, (b) Ease of Adjustment to College, and (c) Habits of Mind in addition to demographic data. Responses from both collegiate student-athletes and collegiate student nonathletes were considered. Total scores from these three constructs were averaged to produce a composite score of the researcher-created construct of Academic Involvement. Statistical analysis and data disaggregation found that the magnitude of Academic Involvement is similar for student-athletes across racial and ethnic identities. Additional statistical analysis identified a five-factor structure for the construct of Academic Involvement that applied to a sample of collegiate student nonathletes and collegiate student-athletes. The study seeks to shift the discussion about student-athletes to highlight their academic involvement, rather than discussing them from a deficit perspective. This discussion is framed by tenets of the critical quantitative methodology. Implications for student affairs practitioners working directly with student-athletes or on campuses with student-athletes, as well as implications for those desiring to use apply critical quantitative methods to their research and practice, are discussed in light of the findings from the statistical analysis
Developmental education and African American male college students by Anissa Kenyatta Howard( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The college completion crisis continues to plague institutions of higher education. Years of research have implicated various factors and contributors to college completion which include access problems created by developmental education programs. Remediation, or developmental education has been implicated as a major barrier to degree completion for students of color. Despite prolific research in developmental education and reform, little research exists on subgroup experiences in developmental education. Particularly, African American male college students enrolled in developmental education via co-requisite remediation. This phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of African American male college students enrolled in developmental education via an access partnership between a small rural college and rural university. Participants age 18 and older within the first of developmental course enrollment participated in individual interviews and a focus group to help find the essence of factors that contributed to their perceptions of their abilities to achieve success within the developmental learning context. Six themes emerged through data analysis: quality of faculty staff interactions, in-class experiences, peer interactions, perception of learning support involvement, and personal academic responsibility
Professional competencies and the role of the dean of students at small colleges by Jackie Yvonne Clark( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The role of the Dean of Students (as CSAO) at a small college is multi-faceted, requiring a wide range of knowledge, skills, and abilities. Research and literature on the role of the Dean of Students provides an understanding of the history of the position and how it has changed since its inception over a century ago. However, in the 21st century this research becomes sparser and lacks focus on details of the role, contemporary challenges, and the required competencies to be a successful professional. The present study explored professional competency and the role of the Dean of Students at small colleges. The results of the study add to the literature by offering a better understanding of how Deans of Students at small colleges report their own levels of professional competency and how they seek to increase and expand their competency through specific activities. Data for the study was obtained from participants via an electronically distributed survey. The electronic survey was used to collect responses including demographic participant information, ACPA & NASPA Professional Competencies Rubrics measures, competency expansion opportunities, and responses to two short open-ended questions. The intent of this study was to explore Dean of Students' self-reported levels of competency as measured by the ACPA & NASPA Professional Competencies Rubrics (ACPA & NASPA, 2016) (Appendix A). In addition, participants indicated methods for increasing and expanding competency
Development, implementation, and maintenance of dedicated responses to food insecurity at institutions of higher education : a multi-site case study by Margaret Serritella Tennant( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

At institutions of higher education across the country, since the economic downturn of 2008, student affairs professionals have been hearing anecdotal evidence that students are hungry. In 2009, Chaparro, Zaghloul, Holck, and Dobbs conducted one of the first studies on food insecurity in higher education and found that there was a need to create a dedicated response to the problem. Cady (2014) noted that while data on food insecurity is scarce, based on the campus food bank movement, it is a salient concern in higher education. This multi-site case study was designed to elicit knowledge associated with developing, implementing, and maintaining dedicated responses focused on alleviating food insecurity at institutions of higher education. This qualitative study was conducted at three sites: a private research university in the nation's capital, a Hispanic-serving institution in the south central United States, and an independent liberal arts college in the northwest United States. The purpose of this study is to provide a qualitative understanding of how institutions of higher education develop, implement, and maintain dedicated responses focused on alleviating food insecurity so that the results can be used by other institutions. The case study was designed to identify barriers and opportunities involved in designing campus-based dedicated responses to food insecurity. For this multi-site case study, experiences of professionals were explored through semi-structured interviews based on the work of the College and University Food Bank Alliance (CUFBA) (2017); through reviewing relevant documents such as policies, processes, procedures, and marketing; and through a photo representation project that allowed the researcher to visually observe each of the dedicated responses (Bignante, 2010; Johnson & Christensen, 2014). For each of the sites, the primary response was the establishment of a campus food pantry. In an effort to identify the emergence of both potential common themes or patterns and differences from the data there was a review of the interview transcripts and researcher notes as well as of the documents and photos provided. Findings were aligned with CUFBA recommendations and reflected the importance of documenting campus need, establishing a steering committee, identifying appropriate space, creating strong partnerships, developing effective operational strategies, and focusing on sustainability through marketing and fundraising. Recommendations for practice are included
The lived experience of atheist and irreligious youth living within religious households by Anthony Wayne Hansen( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the U.S., the population of people who identify as atheist or irreligious is growing (Brewster et al., 2014; Zuckerman, 2010, 2011; Kosmin & Keysar, 2008; Zuckerman, 2007). Recent studies show that atheism and irreligious people are viewed in a negative light with many persons in the US; as antipathy toward atheists is greater when compared to other religious groups, racial and ethnic groups, or (LGBTQ) people (Cragun et al., 2012). Hunsberger and Altemeyer (2006) found that conflict within family structures over a family member's lack of belief caused feelings of ostracism and discrimination from other religious family members. Moreover, adolescents report poorer parental relationships when parents are more religious than the youth (Kim-Spoon, Longo, & McCullogough, 2012). Research on atheism remains poor within social science scholarship, psychology, and within counseling psychology specifically. Yet it is apparent that non-belief is quickly becoming a valid issue of diversity within psychology and counseling psychology as a profession (Brewster et al., 2014; D'Andrea & Sprenger, 2007). Counseling psychology has traditionally been at the forefront of social justice issues and cultural competencies within APA, yet the lack of attention to atheism as a diversity issue is problematic (Brewster et al., 2014). The current study sought to explore and understand the experiences of self-identified atheist/irreligious youth who live with their religious parents or are dependent on parents for financial support. A qualitative methodology known as psychological phenomenology, centered in social constructivist theory (Gergen, 1985; Creswell, 2012) and guided by the minority stress model (Meyer, 2003), served as the theoretical foundation into the exploration of the lived experiences of atheist and irreligious youth living within religious households. Results of this study included the identification of three major themes (minority stress, outcomes, support) that represent the varied experiences of atheist/irreligious identifying youth in this study. Additionally, each theme contains one or more subthemes, and a total of seven subthemes were identified. The themes identified through this study have implications for clinical practice, for advocacy, and for continued research centered on the under measured population of atheists in the U.S
How perceptions of public policy and media depictions of undocumented immigrants relate to well-being by Beth Lauren Perlman( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There is a dearth of literature regarding the psychological impact of oppressive sociocultural structures and attitudes related to immigration on various racial and ethnic groups, especially for Latinx individuals and communities. The current research investigated how peoples' perceptions of and exposure to immigration policy and media depictions affect perceived stress, self-efficacy, and beliefs of meritocracy. Participants were recruited from a student research pool in a Southeastern College of Education at a public university and, because Latinx are frequently targeted in immigration policy and messages, a nationwide sample was also recruited. A multivariate linear regression model was implemented to explore the relationship between the different variables. The findings show that the participants who reported more exposure to hostile media depictions about immigrants experienced higher levels of stress and fewer merit-based beliefs. Participants who demonstrated increased emotional reactivity to restrictive immigration policies also showed increased stress levels and less merit-based beliefs. The findings have implications for mental health providers and political actors who work with Latinx clients as well as for educations who train future instructors. Ultimately, the findings underscore the importance of the role of psychologists in not only serving individuals, but also in challenging system inequities and training future educators to incorporate a social justice paradigm into teaching preparation programs
 
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